The Russell & Adam Family
An historical and photographic perspective

SS Norfolk

The Mormon Migration
Janet, Elizabeth & Margaret Russell From Scotland to Salt Lake City, Utah
with members of the Adam, Easton, Grant & Henderson families

Elizabeth & Margaret Russell | Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe & John Gray
Robert Grant & Isabella Adam | James Easton & Agnes Adam | David Henderson & Margaret Adam
Elizabeth Laird Easton | William Thom Adam & Margaret Thomson | Thomas Widdison & Janet Russell
The Adam, Easton, Grant & Henderson families in California
The Easton Family in Oregon

The Mormons | Mormon Extermination Order | Joseph Smith Murdered | Family Members in the Mormon Migration | Nauvoo & The Exodus
The St. Louis Fire & Cholera | The Gravois Coal Mines | The Scotch Independent Company | Salt Lake City | The Morrisites
The Civil War | The Morrisite War | The John Gray Story | The Coal Mines at Mount Diablo | The Black Hawk War | Carson City, Nevada
John Henderson Elected Marshall | The San Bernardino Police Department | The Great War | Martinelli's Soda & Cider Works
John Henderson Elected Mayor of San Bernardino | Adam Brothers Family Farms | DNA Match

1840 | 1850 | 1860 | 1870 | 1880 | 1890 | 1900 | 1910 | 1920 | 1930| 1940 | 1950 | 1960 | 1970 | 1980 | 1990

Elizabeth, Margaret and Janet Russell are the children of Robert Russell & Agnes Adam. Isabella, Agnes and Margaret Adam are the children of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird. Agnes Adam (wife of Robert Russell) and William Thom Adam are the children of Charles Adam and Janet Thom.

DNA: In 2013, a GEDmatch.com Autosomal Comparison between BillH and Jeff Waugh confirms a DNA match with the MRCA at an estimated 3.5 generations. This is the first DNA confirmation of the accuracy of the Waugh Family genealogical research. The most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is Robert Russell and Agnes Adam (through Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe and John Gray for BillH.) We also have an Ancestry.com match with "fullmerconnie" who goes through John T. Adam and Mahalia Haun to William Thom Adam & Margaret Thomson (and to Charles Adam and Janet Thom).

The Russell Family of Chapelhall, Bothwell, Scotland | The Adam Family of Coatbridge, Old Monkland
Russell Family Index of Official Parish Registries and Statutory Registries for Births, Marriages and Deaths
Adam Family Index of Official Parish Registries and Statutory Registries for Births, Marriages and Deaths

The Waugh Family Library

Book of Mormon, by Joseph Smith, Jr., 1830 (51 MB pdf)
A Voice of Warning, by Parley P. Pratt (26 MB pdf)
The Saints and St. Louis, 1831-1857 by Stanley B. Kimball (12 MB pdf)
Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, by Frederick Piercy, 1853 (30 MB pdf)
History of Santa Barbara County, California by Jesse D. Mason, 1883 (77 MB pdf)
A Few Items in the History of the Morrisites  by James A. Dove, c. 1890 (799 kb pdf)
Memoirs of William Laird Adam, 1903 (33 MB pdf)
Ingersoll's century annals of San Bernardino County, 1769-1904, by L.A. Ingersoll, 1904 (53 MB pdf)
History of Indian Depredations in Utah, by Peter Gottfredson, 1919 (21 MB pdf)
Official History of the Second Engineers in the World War 1916-1919, by Regimental HQ (19MB pdf)

The Mormons


Joseph Smith
Brigham Young
Brigham Young

"I am going like a lamb to the slaughter"

"I am going like a lamb to the slaughter, but I am calm as a summer's morning. I have a conscience void of offense toward God and toward all men. If they take my life, I shall die an innocent man, and my blood shall cry from the ground for vengeance, and it shall be said of me, 'He was murdered in cold blood.'" - Joseph Smith shortly before his death on June 27, 1844

The story of Mormonism in Scotland actually begins in Canada—not surprisingly when one realizes that for thousands of expatriate Scots in the nineteenth century, Canada was a second homeland. Two Scotsmen, Alexander Wright of Banffshire and Samuel Mulliner of Midlothian, had settled in Upper Canada (now known as Ontario) in the mid-1830s and shortly thereafter they were converted to the Mormon church. They soon let their relatives know about the new religion by sending to Scotland copies of Parley P. Pratt's A Voice of Warning, and in 1839 they were called to return to their homeland as emissaries of the new American faith. After four months of proselyting, by May of 1840, they had baptized some eighty Scots into the Church, and shortly thereafter the first Latter-day Saint branch was organized at Paisley by Apostle Orson Pratt. By the end of the century some ten thousand people had joined the Church in Scotland, and almost half of the converts had left Scotland as part of the Mormon gathering to Zion. - from The Ebb and Flow of Mormonism in Scotland, by Frederck S. Buchanan

"City of Refuge"

Latter-day Saints use the name Zion to signify a group of God's followers or a place where such a group lives. Latter-day scriptures define Zion as the "pure in heart" (D&C 97:21). Other uses of the name in scripture reflect this one. For example, Zion refers to the place or land appointed by the Lord for the gathering of those who accept his gospel (D&C 101:16-22; 3 Ne. 20-22). The purpose of this gathering is to raise up a committed society of "pure people" who will "serve [God] in righteousness" (D&C 100:13, 16). Hence, the lands of Zion are places where the pure in heart live together in righteousness. Geographical Church units are called "stakes…of Zion" (D&C 101:21-22). The Church and its stakes are called Zion because they are for gathering and purifying a people of God (D&C 43:8-11; Eph. 4:11-13). Scripture also refers to Zion as a "City of Holiness" (Moses 7:19), because the "sanctified" or "pure" live there (Moro. 10:31-33; Alma 13:11-12), and a "city of refuge" where the Lord protects them from the peril of the world (D&C 45:66-67). - from Encyclopedia of Mormonism

Book of Mormon, 1830

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints or the Mormon Church was founded by a young man named Joseph Smith, Jr. in April 1830. Church members were severely persecuted and driven from New York, Ohio, Missouri, and ultimately Illinois. After Joseph Smith's murder in 1844, the Latter Day Saints or Mormons abandoned their homes in Nauvoo, Illinois in fear that mobs would soon come to destroy them. The Mormons fled from Nauvoo on February 4, 1846 for fear of attack. The journey was bitter cold and miserable. It took them approximately four months to cross Iowa, due to severe weather and axle-deep mud. Ultimately, they crossed the Missouri River and settled an area on the Nebraska side, which they called Winter Quarters. Some of the pioneers stayed there for the winter of 1846, while others stopped at temporary camps outside of Winter Quarters. By the spring of 1847, almost 400 lives had been lost, largely due to inadequate provisions and exposure. Having learned many lessons from the previous years hardships, Brigham Young led a vanguard group west from Winter Quarters on April 5, 1847. The first group numbered 148. However, 16,000 Mormons were to follow that year. After traversing over 1,000 miles across Nebraska, Wyoming, and Utah the first group arrived in the Valley of the Great Salt Lake on July 24, 1847. - from The Mormon Trail

 

Missouri Governor Issues Extermination Order Against Mormons, Oct 27, 1838

"The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated..."

Head Quarters of the Militia,
City of Jefferson
Oct. 27, 1838


Sir,

Since the order of this morning to you, directing you to cause four hundred mounted men to be raised within your division, I have received by Amos Reese, Esq., of Ray county, and Wiley C. Williams, Esq., one of my aids, information of the most appalling character, which entirely changes the face of things, and places the Mormons in the attitude of an open and avowed defiance of the laws, and of having made war upon the people of this state. Your orders are, therefore, to hasten your operation with all possible speed. The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the state if necessary for the public peace--their outrages are beyond all description. If you can increase your force, you are authorized to do so to any extent you may consider necessary. I have just issued orders to Maj. Gen. Willock, of Marion county, to raise five hundred men, and to march them to the northern part of Daviess, and there unite with Gen. Doniphan, of Clay, who has been ordered with five hundred men to proceed to the same point for the purpose of intercepting the retreat of the Mormons to the north. They have been directed to communicate with you by express, you can also communicate with them if you find it necessary. Instead therefore of proceeding as at first directed to reinstate the citizens of Daviess in their homes, you will proceed immediately to Richmond and then operate against the Mormons. Brig. Gen. Parks of Ray, has been ordered to have four hundred of his brigade in readiness to join you at Richmond. The whole force will be placed under your command.

I am very respectfully,
your ob't serv't,
 Lilburn W. Boggs, 
Com in Chief

- from Missouri Extermination Order History
See original document
See Missouri's 1838 Extermination Order and the Mormon's Forced Removal to Illinois

 

1839 ..........

"Two valiant sons of Scotland were called to introduce the gospel in Scotland"

Two valiant sons of Scotland, Elders Samuel Mulliner and Alexander Wright, who had embraced the gospel in Canada and had in 1839 both received mission calls, were called to introduce the gospel in Scotland. They arrived in Glasgow on December 20, 1839, and left the following day for Edinburgh, where they were welcomed by Elder Mulliner’s parents. Elder Mulliner stayed with his parents in Edinburgh for a few days; then he began systematic missionary work at Bishopton, near Paisley. On January 10, 1840, in a small meeting room that had been procured for the purpose, he first proclaimed the gospel in public meeting in Scotland. Four days later Alexander Hay and his wife, Jessie, were baptized in the River Clyde, near Bishopton. - from History of the Church in Great Britain, Ensign Magazine, Sept, 1971

A Voice of Warning

Through Parley P. Pratt’s classic missionary pamphlet (A Voice of Warning), the first seeds of testimony began to grow in that austere land. From this very small beginning, nearly ten thousand Scots would join the Church within twenty years, and more than seven thousand would emigrate to the new Zion in Utah. Scotland soon became one of the fertile mission fields of the Restoration, and her own children made it so. The first two elders who broke the ground for those to follow were Scots themselves. One of them was Alexander Wright. - from the Gospel Seeds in Scottish Soil, Ensign Magazine, Feb, 1987

"The barren desert will abound with pools and springs of living water, and produce grass, with flowers blooming and blossoming as the rose, and that too about the time of the coming of their God with vengeance and recompense, which must allude to his second coming; and Israel is to come at the time to Zion with songs of everlasting joy, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away. Thus the curse will be taken off from the deserts and they will become a fruitful, well watered country." - From "The Voice of Warning" by Parley Pratt

 

1843 ..........

Robert Russell, Jr. & Chesterfield Aimer

Robert Russell, Jr. (Janet, Elizabeth and Margaret's younger brother) married Chesterfield Aimer in Dundee on Nov 6, 1843 in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (the Mormon Church). Chesterfield was baptized and confirmed on July 15, 1844. - from Dundee Branch Register Robert and Chesterfield stayed in Scotland.

Dundee Branch Register of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints showing Robert and Chesterfield Russell
Dundee Branch Register of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints showing Robert and Chesterfield Russell
See original document

At this time, there were only about 1,000 members of the Mormon Church in all of Scotland. - from The Ebb and Flow of Mormonism in Scotland, by Frederck S. Buchanan

Read more about Robert Russell and Chesterfield Aimer

 

1844 ..........

The murder of Joseph Smith

Joseph Smith was murdered on June 27, 1844, in Carthage, Illinois, after being charged with treason.

The first formal branch of the Church was organized in St. Louis in the Spring of 1844.

 

Family Members in The Mormon Migration between 1844-1853

Janet, Elizabeth, Robert and Margaret Russell (children of Robert Russell and Agnes Adam) were Mormons living in Chapel Hall, Bothwell, Lanarkshire. The three sisters would emigrate from Scotland to the USA. Agnes Adam's brother, William Thom Adam and six of his children (and the families of three of his daughters) would also emigrate. Of these family members, Robert Grant and Isabella Adam and four of their children, Isabella Easton (5), and David Henderson (and possibly his infant son Charles) would perish in the St. Louis cholera outbreak of 1849. John (brother of James) Easton's wife Agnes "Anne" Mitchell and their daughters Elizabeth and Barbara also succumbed to cholera. Robert (brother of James) Easton's wife Margaret Lindsay and their daughter Elizabeth also died in that epidemic as did Robert (9), Peter (7) and Alexander Easton (4) (sons of Alexander Easton and Mary McDougall).

NAME Year - Ship Family Members
ADAM 1844 - Norfolk Isabella Adam Grant
1845 - Oregon Agnes Adam Easton
1850 - Berlin Margaret Adam Henderson
1850 - North Atlantic William Thom Adam and his children: Jemima, William Laird and Alexander (along with grandchildren William and Isabella Henderson)
EASTON 1845 - Oregon James Easton and Agnes Adam and their infant daughter Isabella
1850 - Hartley Elizabeth Laird Easton and her children: Matthew, Margaret & Jean
GRANT 1844 - Norfolk Robert Grant & Isabella Adam and their children: John, Isabella, William & Agnes
GRAY 1845 - Parthenon John Gray (may be a different John Gray than the one who married Elizabeth Russell)
HENDERSON 1849 - Berlin David Henderson & Margaret Adam and their children: Margaret, David, Janet, Mary Adam and Charles Adam
1850 - North Atlantic Isabella & William (with William Thom Adam)
LIVINGSTON 1853 - Falcon James Campbell Livingston (would marry both Agnes & Hannah Widdison in plural marriage)
RUSSELL 1844 - Norfolk Margaret & Elizabeth Russell and Andrew Wardrobe
1853 - Falcon Janet Russell
WARDROBE 1844 - Norfolk Elizabeth Russell & Andrew Wardrobe
WIDDISON 1853 - Falcon Thomas Widdison & Janet Russell and their children: Agnes, Hannah, Robert and William

 

"the persecution became So gineral that for the Sake of peace
we agreed to leave as early in the  Spring of 1846"

 

"The winter of 43 and 4 I Spent in Nauvoo enjoying the refreshing teachings from the lips of Prest. Joseph Smith & Hyrum in the Spring of 1844 the tide of emegration  in to Nauvoo had for a time been gradualy increasing, and had caused  a Spirit of Jelousey to arise in the  breasts of our eneymies they feard  that if they left us thus alone all  men would believe on us and  the Mormons would take away their  place and nation, and hold the balance  of power, acordingly our old enemies  re newed the attact and new ones  Joined in the percecution until  it became quite warm, and  then to assist Satan in his  Cours of percecution several  Appostatised and Joined the Mob in  purcecuting the Saints and Commen  ced publishing a Newspaper called the  Nauvoo exposeter and one No was  ishued. the City Council pronounced  it a nucancer and ordered it removed. at the time I was acting in  the Poliece who was called upon to  re move and destroy the press type  and all libilous prints &c. this  Caused quite a Stir with our enemies  and Soon their Cries ware So loud that  the Governer of the State took the field  in person at the head of a bodey of  militia Br Joseph Surendered  to a demand made for him and Stood his trial they not finding or not  being able to prove eney thing against  him, he was discharged but they soon  found another endightment or  Charge against him and for his  Safety for a fiew days he was placed  in Carthage gaol when they Saw no  Chance of Substanciating eney thing  against him, they arose in mob and  broke open the Gaol and Killd Joseph  and Hyrum and severely wounded  Elder John Taylor on the 27th day of June  1844. during this time I was serveing as  poliece man on almost Constant duty  night and day and in So doing  exposed my Self to wet and cold  and Soon after was taken Sick with  Chills Ague & fever and for 3 months  was verry Sick in fact the Sickest  that ever I was in my life. My recoverey  was but Slowly. during this time our  enemies ware verey active agains us  and the work of a postacy was going on  Sidney Rigdon J. Strang Wm Smith and several others ware excomunicated  who with the 2 Laws, 2 Fosters & 2 Higbees ware figureing against us.  During this time Br Brigham Young was Acknowledged presedent of the  Church the Temple Continued to progress  while our enemies Con tinued to Haras us  in the fall of 1845 their percecution  became mutch warmer even so  they commenced Burning houses  Grain Stacks driving of cattle catching  and whiping the Breathering and some  ware Killed. the persecution became  So gineral that for the Sake of peace  we agreed to leave as early in the  Spring of 1846 as Circumstances  would admit of...

- from Appleton Milo Harmon's Journal, Volume 1

 

Margaret Russell & Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe and Robert Grant & Isabella Adam

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe c 1844
Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe c 1844
Photo courtesy Norna Groff, great-great grand daughter of Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe Gray

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe's husband Andrew Wardrobe, Sr. (25 year old "silver chaser") died on May 27, 1838, in Glasgow. Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe (dressmaker) and her six year old son Andrew, along with Elizabeth's little sister Margaret, boarded the Norfolk in Liverpool, England on Sept 19, 1844, and arrived in New Orleans, Louisiana, on Nov 11, 1844, en route to the Mormon settlement of Nauvoo, Illinois. Along with the Russell's were Robert Grant, his wife Isabella Adam (Elizabeth and Margaret's cousin) and their family. Robert Grant and Isabella Adam and all but one of their children (John) died in the 1849 cholera epidemic in St. Louis.

John Grant & Margaret Nish

 

Sept 19, 1844, Norfolk, 661 passengers, Captain Elliott, 143 Saints
Reuben Hedlock Agent, 1844-1846
Sept 19, 1844, Norfolk, 661 tons, Captain Elliott, 143 Saints
From Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, Frederick Piercy, 1853

Emigration... The Latter Day Saints Millennial Star, November, 1844
The Latter Day Saints Millennial Star, November, 1844

"EMIGRATION. -- The fine ship Norfolk, Captain Elliot, sailed from this port on the 19th September, under very favorable circumstances, at a quarter past three p.m., having on board about 143 souls put on by us. We rejoice to see so practical an illustration of the faith of the Saints being unshaken by the late tragical events in the West, and that the Saints are not living according to the precepts of men, but the word of the Lord. Any anxious to emigrate about the 12th instant, can have an opportunity of doing so, by making early application. Early in January next we expect to charter a ship, and should be glad to receive notice as soon as possible of all who intend to go at that time." 

"TWENTY EIGHTH COMPANY. -- Norfolk, 143 souls . . . This was the first ship load of Saints sent out from England after the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph Smith. Proceeding up the river, a number of the emigrants found it necessary, for the lack of means, to settle down temporarily at St. Louis, Missouri, while all who were able , continued to Nauvoo." "Thurs. 19. [Sep. 1844] -- The ship Norfolk sailed from Liverpool with 143 Saints, bound for Nauvoo."

- from Liverpool to New Orleans, Sept 19, 1844

SS Norfolk
SS Norfolk
Photo courtesy
John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland, Australia.

Report and List of the Passengers taken on board the Ship Norfolk of Boston
Report and List of the Passengers taken on board the Ship Norfolk of Boston

Passenger List of the Norfolk


Robert Grant (29), Isabella (24), John (6), Isabella (2), William (1), Agnes (infant)
Elizabeth Wardrop (29), Andrew Wardrop (6) and Margaret Russell (27).
From New Orleans Passenger Lists 1820-1945, Ancestry.com
See original document

We have no further information on Margaret.

The Steamer Missouri on the Mississippi River c 1845
The Steamer Missouri on the Mississippi River c 1845

Hannibal, Missouri, just down river from Keokuk, Iowa, and Nauvoo, Illinois
Hannibal, Missouri, just down river from Keokuk, Iowa, and Nauvoo, Illinois, c. 1841
Hannibal was the boyhood home of Mark Twain
Painting by John Stobart

Encampment on the Mississippi River c. 1842
Encampment on the Mississippi River c. 1842
Painting by John Stobart

 

1845 ..........

John Gray

A John Gray (born 1820, farmer) sailed from Liverpool aboard the Parthenon on March 30, 1845, and arrived in New Orleans on May 12, 1845. - See Liverpool to New Orleans, March 30, 1845

 

"Left Liverpool and set sail for America with one son & one daughter on Sunday the 30th day of March 1845 on board the ship Parthenon, Captain Woodburry. After a pleasant voyage of six weeks arrived at New Orleans on the 12th day of May in the afternoon. Arrived at Saint Louis on the 20th of May. At this place my father met us from Nauvoo who had left Liverpool one year before us on the ship "John Cummin." Arrived at Nauvoo on the 23rd day of May near night. . . .

- from BIB: Bennion, Samuel. Notebook (Ms 8125), p.23. (CHL)

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe probably met John Gray in or near St. Louis or Nauvoo.

 

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe & John Gray

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe (daughter of Robert Russell and Agnes Adam) married John Gray. They had four children: Isabelle (born Dec 10, 1848 in St. Louis, Missouri); Robert A. (1850-1852); Robert Russell (born Jan 15, 1852 in Salt Lake City, Utah); and William Wallace (born Feb 14, 1854, in Utah). - Glenda Waugh

Andrew Wardrobe & Isabella Slack | Isabel Gray & Henry Clay Powers | Robert Russell Gray & Eliza Frances Follett

 

James Easton & Agnes Adam

James Easton, Agnes Adam (daughter of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) and their daughter Isabella (infant) boarded the SS Oregon in Liverpool on Sept 1, 1845, and arrived into New Orleans, Louisiana, on Oct 28, 1845. Isabella died in 1849 in the St. Louis cholera outbreak. They had at least six other children: Margaret (born about 1849 in Missouri); Agnes (born about 1852 in Utah); James Adam (born May 29, 1853 in Utah); Charles Alexander (born Dec 25, 1858); Jemima (born about 1859 in California); and John Franklin (born May 17, 1861). - Glenda Waugh

James Adam Easton & Nettie Moad | John Franklin Easton & Elizabeth Feld

James Easton married Nettie Moad and their children were: James Easton Jr. of Boyd; John of Alberta; Wolmont of Camas; Agnes (Mrs. Chas. Welhelm) of Boyd; and Belle Sternweis of Boyd. - From Wasco County History

 

"THIRTY-FIRST COMPANY. -- Oregon, about 125 souls. Some time in September, 1845, the ship Oregon, Captain Borland, sailed from Liverpool with about one hundred and twenty-five Latter-day Saint passengers, bound for Nauvoo, via New Orleans. We have been unable to glean any information about the voyage." Cont., 12:12 (Oct. 1891), p.450 "[Sep. 1, 1845] -- The ship Oregon sailed from Liverpool, England, with a company of Saints bound for Nauvoo, Illinois" CC, p.28

List of All Passengers on board the Ship Oregon whereof Borland is Master, at the Port of Liverpool and bound for New-Orleans
List of All Passengers on board the Ship Oregon whereof James Borland is Master, at the Port of Liverpool and bound for New-Orleans

James Easton (22) miner, Agnes Easton (21) and Isabella Easton (infant)
James Easton (22) miner, Agnes Easton (21) and Isabella Easton (infant)
See original document (3 pages)

James, Agnes and Isabella traveled on to St. Louis, Missouri, and were there during the great fire and cholera outbreak of 1849 and where Isabella died. It's possible that they travelled all the way to Nauvoo, but then returned to St. Louis the following year during the exodus...

 

1845 ..........

Vancouver Island - Final Destination and Home of the Mormon People

Vancouver Island - Final Destination and Home of the Mormon People
Glasgow Herald, Friday, Nov 28, 1845

 

1846 ..........

Nauvoo, Illinois

Nauvoo Temple c 1847
Nauvoo Temple c 1846

Nauvoo c 1846
Nauvoo c 1846

Temple at Nauvoo

In all of Church history, perhaps nothing symbolizes the pragmatic nature of Latter-day Saint religion as does the city of Nauvoo. On the very hem of the western frontier, the Latter-day Saints drained the swamps, wrote an ambitious city charter, established a university, mounted a city militia, and built a temple.

To Nauvoo and its vicinity came the great majority of all Latter-day Saint converts for the next seven years, swelling the population to about 20,000 by 1846. At its height it rivalled Chicago as the largest city in the state. A vibrant, culturally eclectic place, it came to be known as "Nauvoo, the Beautiful."

Painting of the Exodus from Nauvoo
Painting of the Exodus from Nauvoo

On 4 February 1846, in the heart of a Midwestern winter so cold and bitter the Mississippi River froze over, the Latter-day Saints were driven from their homes and lands (in Nauvoo) down a street which came to be known as the "Street of Tears" and into the unknown mystery of the western frontier... "For Brigham Young and his associates, the 1846 exodus from Nauvoo, far from being a disaster imposed by enemies, was foretold and foreordained—a key to understanding LDS history and a necessary prelude for greater things to come. From a later perspective too, scholars of the Mormon experience have come to see the exodus and colonization of the Great Basin as the single most important influence in molding the Latter-day Saints into a distinctive people". (Reed C. Durham Jr., "Westward Migration, Planning and Prophecy," in Daniel H. Ludlow, ed., Encyclopedia of Mormonism, 5 vols. [1992], 4:1563). - from Nauvoo, Illinois, 1839-1846

"In every part of the city scenes of destitution, misery and woe met the eye. Families were hurrying away from their homes, without a shelter, — without means of conveyance, — without tents, money, or a day's provision, with as much of their household stuff as they could carry in their hands. Sick men and women were carried upon their beds — weary mothers, with helpless babes dying in their arms, hurried away — all fleeing, they scarcely knew or cared whither, so it was from their enemies, whom they feared more than the waves of the Mississippi, or the heat, and hunger and lingering life and dreaded death of the prairies on which they were about to be cast. The ferry boats were crowded, and the river bank was lined with anxious fugitives, sadly awaiting their turn to pass over and take up their solitary march to the wilderness." - from Nauvoo Guide, 1939

No odyssey in Mormon history surpasses the tragedy and triumph of the Mormon exodus (February to June 1846) from Nauvoo, Illinois, to Winter Quarters, Nebraska. Deaths and other tragedies were varied and numerous, resulting from such terrors as “black scurvy,” cholera morbus, typhoid fever, “quick consumption” (tuberculosis), and maternal deaths, not to mention the weaknesses of human beings under stress. The triumph derived from the successful emigration of thousands of men, women, children, and livestock under such abominable conditions.

- From The Iowa Trek of 1846: The Brigham Young Route from Nauvoo to Winter Quarters by Stanley B. Kimball, Ensign Magazine, June 1972. Read more at The Pioneer Trek: Nauvoo to Winter Quarters by William Hartley, Ensign Magazine, June, 1997

 

The Mormon Emigration to Oregon

The Mormon Emigration to Oregon
Glasgow Herald, Monday, June 15, 1846

 

1847 ..........

"St. Louis was designated a gathering place for the driven from Nauvoo"

From The Saints and St. Louis, 1831-1857 by Stanley B. Kimball
From The Saints and St. Louis, 1831-1857 by Stanley B. Kimball

 

1848 ..........

Elizabeth Russell & John Gray

Evidence from land and Church records indicates that Elizabeth Russell and John Gray along with Elizabeth's son Andrew Wardrobe and their infant daughter Isabel (born in Missouri in 1846) travelled (with "unidentified companies") to Utah in 1848.

 

John Grant and wife and son, a number of the Easton family and others...

In the winter of 1848, Mormon Scots again began to cross the Atlantic. One group came on the Carnatic, which had about 120 Mormon emigrants on board, half of whom were from Scotland. These Scottish Saints arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in the fall of 1848, following a rough ocean crossing. The following year, Frederic Gardner noted on the voyage of the James Pennell, “I believe altogether there are about 250 souls, probably one hundred or more of whom are from Scotland. But all are filled with the spirit of the gospel, and working in harmony with each other.” John Penman remembered, “Myself, wife, and three children bid adieu to dear old Scotland and cast our lot with the Mormons and to make a home with that peculiar people in the desert wilds of North America.” During the latter half of the nineteenth century, the Scots gathered as individuals and families by the hundreds and thousands to make a desert blossom as a rose. - from Conveyance & Contribution: Mormon Scots Gather to an American Zion

"THIRTY-THIRD COMPANY, -- Carnatic, 120 Saints. The ship Carnatic, Captain McKenzie, obtained its clearance papers on the eighteenth of February, 1848, and sailed on the morning of the 20th, with a company of one hundred and twenty Saints on board, nearly one hundred of whom were adults. This company which was made up upon short notice of Saints 'with cheerful hopes and buoyant feelings,' went out under the superintendence of Elder Franklin D. Richards, assisted by Cyrus H. Wheelock, and Andrew Cahoon, Samuel W. Richards, another American elder, who returned with the Carnatic, acted as clerk for the company... For thirteen days the Carnatic was tossed violently about in the Channel and Irish Sea, during which time nearly all the emigrants suffered more or less from seasickness. On Sunday, February 27th, the vessel was beating off Milford, and it was proposed by the captain, if the weather did not change, to put into Haven the next day, but she succeeded in clearing the cape and standing out to sea. Several times she ran so close upon the rocks and shoals, that the captain ordered put on all the sail she could bear, which made her roll and wallow in the seas with apparent madness; but the threatened danger was thereby avoided. This was the roughest part of the entire voyage. As soon as the elements and the seasickness would permit the emigrants were organized into such divisions as equalized the labor of cleaning, building fires, receiving water, maintaining watch, etc., among the men each day of the week. Regular hours were also appointed for prayer and meetings held on the Sabbath, when the sacrament was also administered. When the captain saw how diligent the Saints were in observing good orders, he laid aside the rigid formality of ship rules, and granted them every comfort and convenience which the vessel afforded. When warmer latitudes were reached, he also prepared shower baths and other baths which conduced much to the health and comfort of the company. - From Liverpool to New Orleans on the Carnatic Feb 20, 1848

 

"On Sunday 20 February 1848, 120 Saints set sail from Liverpool on the ship Carnatic. The company was called the Franklin Richards Company. I learned from Historian Andrew Jenson that this was the first company of Saints that sailed from Europe booked for the Salt Lake Valley. The ship arrived at New Orleans about April 19th, whence the company proceeded up the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. We spent about two months on the water. In the immediate company with my parents were my aunt Mary Bulloch, John Stoddard and wife and two sons David and John Jr., Alec Keer and wife and son Alec Jr. and nephew Robert Keer, James Williamson and wife and children, Mathew Cruthers and family, and John Grant and wife and son, a number of the Easton family and others.

My father and Mathew Cruthers purchased a farm near Saint Louis where they worked for two years. . . . [p.215] . . . After leaving St. Louis we traveled onward until we came to Council Bluffs where we were joined by others and organized into a large company. . . . We all arrived safely in Salt Lake two weeks ahead of the big company of 1851. . . . [p.216]

- from Bulloch, David Dunn, [Autobiography], Our Pioneer Heritage, comp, by Kate B. Carter, vol. 18 (Salt Lake City: Daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1975) pp. 215-16. (CHL)

The Bulloch, Stoddard, and Kier families travelled with the John Easton (or Scotch Independent) Company from St. Louis to Salt Lake City in July, 1851. See the Passenger List for the Carnatic.

The entire company of emigrants left New Orleans Sunday morning, April 23rd, on board the steamboat Mameluke, and, after a pleasant trip arrived at St. Louis Sunday afternoon, April 30th. As the Saints were counseled not to remain at St. Louis, all who had means to go to Pottawattamie lands, began at once to make preparations to continue the journey farther up the river; and finally a contract was made with Captain Patterson of the steamboat Mustang to take the Carnatic company (as well as other emigrating Saints who had arrived in St. Louis from different parts of the United States), to Winter Quarters, at the rate of about five dollars for each person over twelve years of age, allowing one hundred pounds luggage to each. This company -- which consisted of about one hundred and fifty souls -- sailed from St. Louis about the ninth of May, and arrived at Winter Quarters about the middle of the month. (Millennial Star, Volume X, page 203.) - From Liverpool to New Orleans on the Carnatic Feb 20, 1848

James, Agnes and Margaret  Easton remained in St. Louis until at least 1850.

 

The Mexican-American War

Map of Oregon, Upper California & New Mexico, 1845
Map of Oregon, Upper California & New Mexico, 1845

The Mexican-American War: The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo sealed the American victory in 1848. In return for $15 million and the assumption of Mexican debts to Americans, Mexico gave up its hold over New Mexico and California. The enormous territory included present-day California, Nevada, Utah, and parts of Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Colorado and Wyoming. Mexico also agreed to finally relinquish all of Texas, including the disputed area along the border. The U.S. Congress approved the treaty on March 10. - from The Mexican American War

 

1849 ..........

David Henderson & Margaret Adam

Margaret Adam Henderson
Margaret Adam Henderson
Photo courtesy Chloe Perdew

Margaret Adam (daughter of William T. Adam and Isobel Laird) married David Henderson on June 23, 1833. They had at least eight children: William McDonald (born Nov 17, 1833, in Coatbridge); Isabel (born about 1835); Margaret Victoria (born about 1837); Charles Adam (born July 21, 1839, in Old Monkland or Coatbridge, and died before 1849); David Glen (born March 28, 1842); Janet Adam (born about 1844); Mary Adam (born about 1847); and Charles Adam (born 1849). - Scotland's People, 1841 Scotland Census and Liverpool to New Orleans Ship List

Margaret Adam and David Henderson and five of their children (Margaret, David, Janet, Mary Adam and Charles Adam) boarded the ship Berlin in Liverpool on Sept 5, 1849, and arrived into New Orleans, Louisiana, on Oct 23, 1849. Their children Isabella and William would follow the following year with Margaret's father (William Thom Adam).

William McDonald Henderson & Mary Winn | Isabel Henderson & William Nish
Margaret Henderson & Charles Mogeau  | Margaret Henderson & Henry Yager  | David Glen Henderson & Matilda Caroline Hawker
Janet Henderson & Thomas Benjamin Walkinshaw | Janet Henderson & William Brown Roberds
Mary Adam Henderson & Thomas Ashcroft | Mary Adam Henderson & William Levic

David Henderson died in the 1849 cholera outbreak in St. Louis, Missouri, and their infant son Charles probably died there, too. After David's death, Margaret married James Easton (husband of her sister Agnes) and had a son named John with him (John would go by the name of John Henderson).

 

". . .The ship Berlin sailed for New Orleans on the 5th day of September, carrying 253 souls of the Latter-day Saints. . . ."

"FORTY-FOURTH company. -- Berlin 253 souls. The ship Berlin sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans with two hundred and fifty-three Latter-day Saints on board, September 5th, 1849, under the presidency of James G. Brown. (Millennial Star, Vol. XI, page 363.) The company had a tedious voyage, during which the passengers suffered much from cholera and forty-three deaths occurred on board, of whom thirteen adults and fifteen children belonged to the Saints. The other deaths were among passengers and apostates of where there were a number on board. . . . . . .This was the greatest loss of life that up to that time had been experienced among the Saints wending their way to Zion, since the emigration from Europe commenced in 1840. As some of those who died had no relatives on board, their property was left with Elder McKenzie, the church agent, at New Orleans, subject to orders from their relatives in England. Their bedding and other goods that was thought affected with cholera were thrown overboard. The Saints were well pleased with Brother Brown as their presiding officer, but were highly dissatisfied with Captain Smith's conduct toward them. (Millennial Star, Vol. XI, page 363.) On the twenty-second of October, 1849, on the same day that the James Pennell reached port, the Berlin arrived at New Orleans, with that part of the company who had escaped a watery grave. The largest portion of the Saints emigrating in the Berlin was sent up the Mississippi River by the church agent, Thomas McKenzie, but some stopped at New Orleans, where they found employment for the winter. (Millennial Star, Vol. XI, page 284, 363; Vol. XII, page 14.)" "Wed. 5. [Sep. 1849] -- The ship Berlin sailed from Liverpool with 253 Saints, under James G. Brown's direction, bound for G. [Great] S. [Salt] L. [Lake] Valley; it arrived at New Orleans Oct. 22nd. Twenty-six died on the voyage, of cholera."

- from Liverpool to New Orleans, Sept 5, 1849

David Henderson (38), Margaret (33), David (12), David (7), Janet (5), Mary (2) and Charles (infant)
David Henderson (38), Margaret (33), David (12), David (7), Janet (5), Mary (2) and Charles (infant)
The 12 year old would be Margaret not David
From New Orleans Passenger Lists, 1820-1945, Ancestry.com

 

The St. Louis Fire & Cholera

It was during this time, most likely between June and September of 1849 that David Henderson died from heat stroke (or possibly cholera) while working in the coal mines near St. Louis. He was buried in St. Louis in an area known at the time as Dogtown. He left Margaret a widow at the age of 34 with 6 children to care for. This was just the beginning of hard times for Margaret. The area of St. Louis was in the grip of a major cholera epidemic. Her sister, Agnes, was so sick with the cholera, that she was on her deathbed and burial arrangements were being made. Margaret nursed her back to health while caring for her own six children, as well as Agnes Easton's five children in St. Louis. (They were living next door to each other in the 1850 census and David is not listed.) Another of Margaret's sisters, Isabelle, her husband John Grant (Ed. Note: Isabella Adam married Robert Grant on Nov 27, 1836), and all of her children but one, died from cholera while in St. Louis. The surviving child, Johnny Grant, was taken in and raised by Margaret and her sister, Agnes.  - from Findagrave for Margaret Ada Adam Henderson

In December of 1848 the Asiatic cholery made its appearance in New Orleans, and thousend of its people died of the plague during the winter. In a few days after the death of my wife I sailed up the river in a steam boat for Saint Loues. and during 7 days passeg we had 37 deaths from cholerey, making an averig of 5 per day. This was a terible site, To see men and women In the very bloom of life smiten and In a few hours they ware corps. Very little ceremony was made in buring the dead. The Boat would stop. The hands would dig a trench, and place the corps side by side and huredly cover them up. And no mark left to show the resting place of the dead. In the first week of May 1849 I arived at St. Louise ware the destroyer was reap ing a rich harvest many of the people had left the City and camped In tents outside of the City. Verey many thousands of Its people died from the pestilence during the warm wether. On my arival hear I found a large Branch of the Church Presided over by N. H. Felt. During this sumer I was sick with Billious Feaver most all the sumer. And for a time not expected to live. But through the providence of God my life was spared. - from Welsh Mormon History by John Parry

The Great Fire, St. Louis, Missouri


The Great Fire, St. Louis, Missouri, May 17, 1849

Great Fire of 1849 consumed 23 steamboats and the riverside commercial district. It gave firefighters their first hometown hero, Capt. Thomas Targee, who was blown up while clearing buildings for a firebreak. As the fire raged, a far deadlier event was ravaging St. Louis — a cholera epidemic that killed at least 6 percent of the city's population. It decimated the immigrant slums. Many wealthier residents, including some City Council members, fled to the country. The cholera inflicted its worst in late July with a weekly toll of 640, seven times the city's normal death rate. The July 18, 1849, Missouri Republican newspaper noted 88 burials that day — not by name, only grouped by cemetery. - From StLouisToday.com

"Ravages of That Fell Destroyer, the Asiatic Cholera"


From A Mournful Elegy on the Unfortunate Victims, Who Fell Sacrifices to the Ravages of That Fell Destroyer, the Asiatic Cholera,
at the Gravois Coal Diggings, Near St. Louis, Mo., June and July, 1849 by John Russel, teacher in the doomed district.

Robert and Isabella Adam Grant and four of their children also died at Gravois Coal Diggings near St. Louis, Missouri, sometime in June,1849. - from A Mournful Elegy on the Unfortunate Victims, Who Fell Sacrifices to the Ravages of That Fell Destroyer, the Asiatic Cholera, at the Gravois Coal Diggings, Near St. Louis, Mo., June and July, 1849 by John Russel, teacher in the doomed district. They died on June 24, 1849, and were buried in the original "Old Picker's" cemetery - from Find A Grave for Isabella Adam Grant.
 

Ed Note: The "Old Picker's cemetery no longer exists. From Greg Myers: "OLD " Picker Cemetery also called Picott Cemetery is long gone (operated from 1845 to 1898), it use to be where now Roosevelt High School is (Gravois & Compton & Wyoming up to about Arsenal & Compton over to Louisiana & Arsenal and down to Louisiana and Wyoming). Some bodies were moved to " NEW " Picker, others to other places, and some left. (I went to Roosevelt High School and once in awhile a human bone would surface in the football field over the years and also in some of the backyards of houses along Arsenal, I guess from the pressure of the activity and games above the remains .... worked them upward over the years). Most headstones were destroyed and used for the foundation, etc. "NEW" Picker now called GATEWOOD GARDENS is located right next to Saints Peter and Paul Cemetery (Catholic) at Gravois and Hampton. The records are hard to find, and care taker after care taker have been in trouble for not keeping to contracts and up keeping this cemetery. Read more about Old Picker's Cemetery from Find A Grave

"Isabella, 5, daughter of James Easton", was also recorded as dying in the cholera epidemic at Gravois near St. Louis, Missouri, in the summer of 1849. -  from Karen Bray Keeley, Findagrave.com and A Mournful Elegy on the Unfortunate Victims, Who Fell Sacrifices to the Ravages of That Fell Destroyer, the Asiatic Cholera, at the Gravois Coal Diggings, Near St. Louis, Mo., June and July, 1849 by John Russel, teacher in the doomed district.

The following people were recorded as being buried in the Old Picker's Cemetery at Gravois, St. Louis during the 1849 cholera epidemic: Isabella Easton (5): Agnes Ann Mitchell Easton (wife of John Easton); Elizabeth Easton (5) (daughter of John Easton);  Barbara Easton (8) (daughter of John Easton); Elizabeth Easton (5) (daughter of Robert Easton and Margaret Lindsay); Margaret Lindsey Easton (wife of Robert Easton); and Alexander Easton (4), Peter Easton (7) and Robert Easton (9) (sons of Alexander Easton and Mary McDougall). - from Find A Grave - Old Picker's Cemetery

David Henderson (and possibly his infant son Charles) would also perish in the St. Louis cholera outbreak of 1849.

St. Louis experienced several cholera epidemics, which are documented in reports from the Committee of Public Health. The reports provide good documentation of the difficulties at that time, plus a list of available cemeteries. A report dated 19 July 1849 states, “in a little over one hundred days six thousand persons have been committed to the grave, and this out of a population of less than sixty thousand.” The same report lists the cemeteries in 1849: “City, Holy Ghost, Lutheran, St. Vincent, German Protestant, Catholic (old), Catholic (new), Wesleyan, Methodist, Christ Church, Presbyterian, Baptist, and United Hebrew.” - from St. Louis Genealogical Society

 

1850 ..........

The Compromise of 1850 made Utah a U.S. territory. Brigham Young was appointed its s first territorial governor in 1850 and re-appointed in 1854, but conflict soon developed between his theocracy and several non-Mormon officials who had been sent to the territory by the federal government. Those officials levied accusations of intimidation and the destruction of government documents against Young. From the beginnings of his presidency, James Buchanan judged it necessary to use force to assert federal supremacy in Utah. In the spring of 1857 he declared the territory in "rebellion," and soldiers amounting to 20 percent of the entire American army began to march west that summer. For the Mormons, this approaching force raised the specter of past "extermination orders" and state-sanctioned violence against them, and Young's followers prepared for war. In August, the Mormon leader declared himself in defiance of all "Governments, but especially ours ... I will fight them and I will fight all hell." - from The Mountain Meadows Massacre

 

Elizabeth Russell & John Gray in Salt Lake City

Elizabeth Russell married John Gray (born about 1818 in Scotland) sometime before 1850, and probably in St. Louis, Missouri. The 1850 Census for Utah Territory, Great Salt Lake County, USA, lists a John Gray (carpenter, 32 years old, born in Scotland) with his wife Elizabeth (40 years old, born in Scotland) and their children: Andrew (12 years old, born in Scotland), Isabel (4 years old, born in "Mo") and Robert A. (3 months old, born in "Des"). There was also a Mary J. Van Valtenburgh (11) in the household at the time.

1850 United States Federal Census - Great Salt Lake City, Utah
Elizabeth Russell & John Gray and family
 

Name: Elizabeth Gray
Age: 40
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1810
Birth Place: Scotland
Gender: Female
Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Family Number: 33
Household Members:
Name Age
John Gray 32
Elizabeth Gray 40
Andrew Gray 12
Isabel Gray 4
Robert A Gray 0
Mary J Van Valtenberg 11

Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place:  , Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M432_919; Page: 26B; Image: 56. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1850 United States Federal Census, the Seventh Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1850 Federal Census.

Andrew Gray is Andrew Wardrobe. Isabel was born in Missouri and Robert in Des Moines, Iowa.

 

Elizabeth Laird Easton (mother of James Easton)

On March 2, 1850, Elizabeth Laird Easton and her children Matthew (19) and twins Margaret and Jean (15) boarded the Hartley in Liverpool and arrived in New Orleans, Louisiana on May 2, 1850.

SS Hartley
SS Hartley

"FORTY-EIGHT COMPANY. -- Hartley, 109 souls. The ship Hartley, carrying one hundred and nine souls of Latter-day Saints, bound for the Valley, sailed from Liverpool, March 2nd, 1850, under the presidency of Elder David Cook. This closed the emigration from Great Britain until the following September. After a passage of fifty-nine days the company arrived in New Orleans May 2nd, 1850, the emigrants generally enjoying good health. During the voyage there was but a very little sickness, but the Saints were much annoyed by the Irish passengers and the conduct of Captain Morrell was shameful, as he did all in his power to make their situation as miserable as possible; and when they were holding their meetings, he took particular pains to annoy them. But while he acted as a demon to the rest of the company, he was exceedingly kind and attentive to two or three females, whom he on different occasions invited into his cabin. These, however, were not members of the Church. Otherwise the voyage was a pleasant one, and the weather was fine and agreeable, so much so that not one of the ship's sails was ever reefed from the day the vessel sailed from Liverpool until its arrival in New Orleans. Only a very few of the passengers suffered from seasickness; no births or marriages occurred during the voyage, but one child died coming up the river on the first of May, and was buried in New Orleans. At New Orleans the company was met by church emigration agent, Thomas McKenzie, who accompanied the Saints up to St. Louis, Missouri, where they arrived about the middle of May. From thence a part, or all, of the emigrants continued the journey to the Bluffs. -- (Millennial Star, Vol. XII, pages 89, 216, 217, 252, 300.)" March. Sat. 2. [1850] -- The ship Hartley sailed from Liverpool, England, with 109 Saints, under David Cook's direction. It arrived at New Orleans May 2nd." - from  Liverpool to New Orleans, March 2, 1850
See also Passenger List of the Hartley

 

"St. Louis, May, 1850

Dear Brother,--The ship Hartley arrived in New Orleans on the 2nd of May, 1850, with a company of Saints under the presidency of Elder David Cook, who I think has discharged his trust faithfully. The Saints that came on the Hartley as far as New Orleans were generally in good health. They had very little sickness on board, but were much annoyed by the Irish passengers. The conduct of Captain Morril was most shameful: he did all in his power to make their situation as miserable as possible; and when they were holding their meetings he took particular pains to annoy them. The Lord reward him according to his deeds. The captain was very kind to some two or three of the females, inviting them into his cabin, and at the same time acting as a demon towards the rest of the company. This is one great evil the sisters have to contend against, namely, the imprudence of some who call themselves sisters.

The Saints have been warned, time after time, on coming to America to be careful of their diet, and of exposing themselves; yet, as soon as they land they commence eating fresh meat and vegetables, and drinking large quantities of water. The consequence is, that when they start up the river they are taken ill. This can be avoided by obeying counsel. The Saints I think would do well to provide themselves with spices, cayenne pepper, mustard, camphor, and peppermint.

I have delayed writing at New Orleans, as I was going up with the company to St. Louis. The second day after we left some of the Saints and others were taken ill with diarrhea. I immediately gave them some remedies I had provided before I started, and all were healed directly. The destroyer is abroad on the waters, and it requires the united faith and prayers of the elders to pass through the scenes that are before them. This I know by experience. All that came on the Hartley have arrived safely in St. Louis. Many of those who are apparently good Saints when they start away, when they arrive in New Orleans find fault with everything, from Brother Pratt down to Thomas Mc'Kenzie. I am now on board the "Era" on my way to the Bluffs, in the company of some good Saints who love and worship God. Praying God to bless you, I remain your respectfully,

Thomas McKenzie

from BIB: Mc'Kenzie, Thomas also Cook, David. Latter-day Saints' Millennial Star 12:14, (Jul 15, 1850), p. 217. (CHL)

 

St. Louis, Missouri

1850 United States Federal Census - St. Louis, Missouri
Margaret & Agnes Adam and their families

Name: Margaret Henderson
Age: 34
Birth Year: abt 1816
Birthplace: England
Home in 1850: St Louis (South half), St Louis, Missouri
Gender: Female
Family Number: 931
Household Members:
Name Age
Margaret Henderson 34
Margaret Henderson 13
David Henderson 8
Jeannette Henderson 5
Mary Henderson 3

Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: St Louis (South half), St Louis, Missouri; Roll: M432_414; Page: 335B; Image: 149. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1850 United States Federal Census, the Seventh Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1850 Federal Census.

Margaret Henderson (34), Margaret (13), David (8), Jeannette (5) and Mary (3)
Margaret Henderson (34), Margaret (13), David (8), Jeannette (5) and Mary (3)
See original document

Elizabeth Laird Easton, George, Matthew, Jane and Margaret were living at Family Numbers 876, 877 and 907.

Margaret Adam Henderson soon became the second wife of James Easton. They were married on April 19, 1852, in Salt Lake City, Utah.

1850 United States Federal Census - St. Louis, Missouri
Alexander Easton & Mary McDougall and their children

Name: Alexr Easton
Age: 32
Birth Year: abt 1818
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1850: St Louis (South half), St Louis, Missouri
Gender: Male
Family Number: 907
Household Members:
Name Age
Alexr Easton 32
Mary Easton 30
John Easton 3
James Easton 0
Elisabeth Easton 11
Margaret Easton 16
Jane Mcmahoe 25
Frederick Mcmahoe 21
Robert Philip 50

Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: St Louis (South half), St Louis, Missouri; Roll: M432_414; Page: 335B; Image: 149. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1850 United States Federal Census, the Seventh Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1850 Federal Census.

 

1850 United States Federal Census - St. Louis, Missouri
John Easton & Margaret Fife and children

Name: John Easton
Age: 28
Birth Year: abt 1822
Birthplace: England
Home in 1850: St Louis (South half), St Louis, Missouri
Gender: Male
Family Number: 965
Household Members:
Name Age
John Easton 28
Margaret Easton 21
Elisabeth Easton 11
Barbara Easton 8
Robert Easton 6

Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: St Louis (South half), St Louis, Missouri; Roll: M432_414; Page: 335B; Image: 149. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1850 United States Federal Census, the Seventh Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1850 Federal Census.

John Easton married Margaret Fife after the death of his first wife in 1849. Elisabeth and Barbara must be the children of one of John's brothers as his daughters died in the 1849 cholera ourbreak.

 

William Thom Adam & Margaret Thomson

William T. Adam (54) and three of his children along with his second wife Margaret Thomson (27) departed Liverpool aboard the North Atlantic on Sept 4, 1850, and arrived in New Orleans, Louisiana, on Nov 1, 1850, (destined for St. Louis, Missouri). Also joining William on this voyage were his grandchildren  Isabella (15) and William Henderson (17) (children of his daughter Margaret Adam and David Henderson). Margaret Thomson's brother John (22) was also on the voyage. William T. Adam married Margaret Thomson on Feb 23, 1845, in Bothwell, and they had at least three children: John Thomson (born about 1853); James (born about 1855) and Agnes (born about 1855).

William Laird Adam & Elizabeth O'Conner
Robert Grant & Isabella Adam | James Easton & Agnes Adam | David Henderson & Margaret Adam
Jemima Adam & George Easton | Alexander Adam & Esther Bradley

John T. Adam & Mahalia Haun

William Adam (54), Jemina (18), William (14) and Alexander (11).
William Adam (54), Jemima (18), William (14) and Alexander (11).
See original document

"EMIGRATION. -- The ship North Atlantic sailed from Liverpool on the morning of the 4th of September, carrying 357 souls of the Latter-day Saints, under the presidency of Elder David Sudworth. Their destination is the Great Salt Lake Valley, via New Orleans, St. Louis, and Council Bluffs. . . ."

"ARRIVAL OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC. -- The ship North Atlantic, which sailed form this port September the 4th, arrived at New Orleans on the 1st day of November. The passage was rather lengthy but safe and pleasant. There were two deaths -- Betty Hulme, aged 63, Katren Bonner, aged 3 years. There was one baptized during the voyage, Ann Burton, from Whaploade, Lincolnshire, on the 15th of September. Two infants were born during the voyage. . . ."

"FORTY NINTH COMPANY. -- North Atlantic, 357 souls. On Wednesday morning, September 4th, 1850, the ship North Atlantic sailed from Liverpool, carrying three hundred and fifty-seven Saints, including children, under the presidency of Elder David Sudworth. After a rather lengthy, but safe and pleasant passage, the company arrived in New Orleans, November 1st. There were two deaths on board, namely, Betty Hulme, aged sixty-three, and Katren Bonner, aged three years. One was added to the Church by baptism during the voyage, namely, Ann Burton, from Lincolnshire, England; she was baptized September 15th. Two infants were born on the ocean. From New Orleans the emigrants continued their journey up the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri. (Millennial Star, Vol. XII, pages 298, 376.)" "Wed. 4. [Sep 1850] -- The ship North Atlantic sailed from Liverpool, England, with 357 Saints, under the presidency of David Sudworth and Hamilton G. Park. It arrived at New Orleans Nov. 1st."

- from Liverpool to New Orleans, Sept 4, 1850

William Laird Adam

William Laird Adam was born in 1836 in Scotland, but in 1850, at 14 years old, he traveled with his parents (Ed. Note: with his father and step-mother) to New Orleans. From there, the clan went up to St. Louis, then over to Iowa, where they joined a Mormon wagon train to Salt Lake City. While there, the teenager was employed as a builder on the Mormon Salt Lake Temple, before the family again picked up and moved to Cedar City, Utah. And finally, the brood set off across the southern desert to San Bernardino, "which they thought was then paradise" Dick Adam said, again receiving good-natured laughter. At 20 years of age, in 1869 (Ed. note: should be 1859), William Laird Adam settled in Santa Maria. He and his wife, Elizabeth Conner, (also known as Elisabeth O'Conner) from Canada, had about 15 children, but only 10 lived to maturity. The Santa Maria transplant purchased more than 1,000 acres of farm land and other real estate, started up a general store, and then became involved in creating structure for the young community. - from Adam brood bred success

 

"A large steamboat named "Sultana" was engaged and prepared for our voyage
up the river to St. Louis, Missouri"

 

Memoirs of William Laird Adam

After awhile the time arrived that we should make departure for the "land of promise". For some time Father had been making preparation, getting tools of different kinds together such as he supposed would be indispensible for settlement in the new country to work in iron or wood. Six large chests were made to stow everything in. Early in September 1850 we took a steamer at the Broomielaw for Liverpool where we took ship to cross the Atlantic. Charles came with us to Liverpool and the voyage was made mostly in the night. We all stayed on deck as long as we could see any trace of Scotland. Next morning we went on board the sailing vessel "North Atlantic", one thousand tons burden, then considered a large ship. Next day Charles went back home and that was the last we seen of any of our kin in Scotland.

Our stay in New Orleans was short. A large steamboat named "Sultana" was engaged and prepared for our voyage up the river to St. Louis, Missouri... The Sultana being a fast boat we had several trials of speed - and usually came out ahead. We heard of barrels of resin and piles of bacon being fed into the furnaces on such occasions, and did not wonder is such occurred as there was always some excitement whenever one boat tried to pass another. The Missouri steamboats at that time were large flat boats - the hold only six to eight feet deep. There, on the main deck was where the freight was piled, and the boilers and engines located. When loaded the boat would often be less then two feet out of the water, and when unloaded about three to five feet. It was a peculiar site to see a vast pile of cotton bales afloat with one or two smoke stacks rising out of the center. When the boat came nearer you could see every available space occupied with bales of cotton - even the cabins and hurricane deck. We were four or five days on the trip to St. Louis... 

- from The Memoirs of William Laird Adam, California Pioneer, 1836-1903, Chapter II, 1850 at age 14, Voyage from Liverpool to New Orleans thence up the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri

The Gravois Coal Mines

The St. Louis Coal Mines
The St. Louis Coal Mines
from The New York Hearald, June 17, 1845

 

Memoirs of William Laird Adam

The climate became cooler as we approached St. Louis, occasionally a chilly wind being quite a contrast from the hot calms of Santo Domingo, the Gulf of Mexico, Cuba and New Orleans of only some two weeks before. So along in November we landed in St. Louis where our sisters Margaret and Agness met us. They were living at Gravois a coal mining suburb, and father having no other plans we went out with them in a coal waggon drawn by two yoke of oxen. There were several Scotch families there - mostly engaged in coal mining, and we were warmly welcomed. Scotch folks are proverbally clanish. The novelty of the situation was quite interesting for awhile.

I went on several trips with Johnny Grant to St. Louis with his team of oxen and wagon of coal, and enjoyed the occupation hugely. He would yoke up his oxen in the morning, go to the pit and load on some 40 to 50 bushels of coal, drive into St. Louis some six miles and go the the coal stand where people in want of coal also came. His coal was weighed at one of the city scales and each bushel tagged with its weight. The next thing was to see how much he could get per bushel. (My recollection was some 9 to 10 cents) Our expenses for weighing and our dinners at Hide camps totalled 30 to 35 cents. Then we picked up two or three bushels of corn at 10 cents per bushel and would go home in the dark and cold. The poor oxen had no shelter and were very poor. They would hang around the door waiting for the next mornings meal. It was a very sorry way of getting a living- looked at from our present standpoint (1900). However, many others were in as bad, if not worse condition. At best the world is a fight with us all, Sister Margaret was left a widow the summer previous to our arrival.  Her husband, David Henderson, had earned enough to buy this ox team and waggon, and for his work a sun stroke resulted and carried him off. She also had the care of her own family and sister Agness and Johnny Grant the son of my sister Isabella. Their little story was a sad one...

The year previous to our arrival the cholera was very fatal. Robert Grant, his wife (my sister Isabella) and all their little family, except John, died. Sister Agness was so near death that they were preparing to bury her. So few recovered from such an attack. William Nish, who afterwards married Bell Henderson, told us of this terrible time.

The Memoirs of William Laird Adam, 1836-1903, Chapter III, 1850-1851 (Age 14-15) Winter in St. Louis, thence up the Missouri River and over the prairie and mountains to Salt Lake City

 

1851 ..........

Lanarkshire, Scotland

1851 Scotland Census - Chapelhall, Bothwell, Lanarkshire
Janet Russell & Thomas Widdison and family
 

Name: Janet Widdowson
Age: 39
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1812
Relationship: Wife
Spouse's Name: Thomas Widdowson
Gender: Female
Where born: Glasgow, Scotland
Parish Number: 625
Civil parish: Bothwell
Town: Chapelhall
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Stirling Road
Occupation: Fife Cutter's Wife
ED: 21
Household schedule number: 23
Line: 18
Roll: CSSCT1851_149
Household Members:
Name Age
Thomas Widdowson 44
Janet Widdowson 39
Agness Widdowson 22
Hannah Widdowson 13
Robert Widdowson 7
Willm Widdowson 4

Source Citation: Parish: Bothwell; ED: 21; Page:  18; Line: 6; Roll: 1162; Year: 1851. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1851 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Scotland. 1851 Scotland Census. Reels 1-217. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1851 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 30/31 March 1851. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

Thomas Widdison was a file cutter. He learned the trade from Janet's step-father, Mark Mounsey.

A Sketch in the Life of the Thomas Widdison Family of Scotland and England | A Sketch in the Life of William Livingston Widdison

1851 Scotland Census - Hollen Bush, Bothwell, Lanarkshire
James Campbell Livingston (17) and his orphaned brothers and sisters living with his grandmother
The other James (21) is identified as Christina's son
 
Name: James Levingston
Age: 17
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1834
Relationship: Grandson
Gender: Male
Where born: Shotts, Lanark
Parish Number: 625
Civil parish: Bothwell
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Hollen Bush
Occupation: Coal Miner
ED: 24
Household schedule number: 83
Line: 2
Roll: CSSCT1851_149
Household Members:
Name Age
Christina Levingston 60
James Levingston 21
Helen Levingston 18
James Levingston 17
Charles Levingston 16
Archibald Levingston 6
William Levingston 3

Source Citation: Parish: Bothwell; ED: 21; Page:  18; Line: 6; Roll: 1162; Year: 1851. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1851 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Scotland. 1851 Scotland Census. Reels 1-217. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1851 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 30/31 March 1851. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

James Campbell Livingstone would eventually marry both Agnes and Hannah Widdison

 

The John Easton (Scotch Independent) Company

On July 1, 1851, the John Easton Company (or Scotch Independent Company) departed St Louis, Missouri. Organized initially as the 4th Ten in the 2nd Fifty of James W. Cummings's company, they left the company on 12 July to travel independently to Utah. They were dissatisfied with the pace of the company and were concerned that they would have enough provisions for the entire distance. They reached Salt Lake several weeks ahead of the Cummings company (on Sept 15, 1851). James Easton and Agnes Adam Easton (daughter of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) were amongst this company as was Elizabeth Laird Easton (James mother) and most (if not all) of her children. - from John Easton Company (1851), Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel

Fourth Ten

Jno. [John] Easton[,] Capt.: 7 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Alex[ande]r Easton: 8 Souls 2 Waggons, 8 Oxen, 2 Cows, 6 Horses
Ja[me]s Easton: 6 Souls, 2 Waggons, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows, 7 Horses
Alex[ande]r Meir: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 4 Cows
Jno. [John] Birt [Burt]: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
Jno. [John] Stodget [Stoddard]: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Ja[me]s Bullock: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Ja[me]s Williams: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Will[ia]m Hartshorn: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen Henry Reese: 1 Soul, 1 Waggon, 2 Cows, 7 Horses
- from Alfred Cordon Emigrating Company, Journal, 1851 June-Sept.

William Thom Adam, Margaret Thompson, John Thompson, Margaret Adam Henderson (and her children William, Isabelle, Margaret, Janet, Mary and David), William Nish (along with the Keir family above) and the Burdic family may also have been with the John Easton Company. - from Findagrave for Margaret Ada Adam Henderson  John Grant may also have been with the John Easton Company. - from John W. Grant

 

"...We lived here [St. Louis] untill the spring of 1851, and then we organized a company of ten to cross the plains to Salt Lake City

John Easton was appointed captain of the ten. and the names of the members of the company are as follows. John Easton and family, James Easton and family, Robert Easton and family, Alexander Easton and family, Mrs. Easton, their mother, and two unmarried sons George and Matthew Easton, James Williamson and family, Sandy Kear [Kerr] and family, Sandy [David] Mustgared [Mustard] and daughter, John and Andrew Burt, Joseph Horn, James, Robert and David Bullock, James Berner, John Stoddard, my father, my mother, John Stoddard, my brother and I David Stoddard.

We left St. Louis in April and were six weeks on the road to Winter Quarters. We were compelled to stop here a long time, it seemed, because the rivers had overthrown their banks and it seemed impos[s]ible to take the old road up the Platte River or that of the old Mexican Trail. So we were compelled to send out scouts to locate a route which would be posible to use in safety.

After a delay of several weeks we were organised into a company of with a train of 50 wagons so as to be strong enough to insure our safety. This company was captioned [captained] by Captain [Alfred] Cardon [Cordon]. Or known as Captain Cardon's Company.

After a week[']s travel we were discouraged as so much time was wasted. Captain [John] Easton called us all into council and laid before us the condition of affairs, ask[ed] if we were willing to travel alone as a company of ten and leave the others. We all agreed to do this as near as I can remember. About the fifth day of our trek, we saw a great cloud of dust in the east, we judged about one mile away. Captain Easton called a halt, we thought it was a band of Indians and we would surely be destroyed. To our surprise we found it to be a large herd of buffalo which we estimated to be around five thousand. The herd we judged to be one mile long and one fo[u]rth of a mile wide. We had all we could do to save our wagons from being turned up side down. Another day we came in sight of a large Indian camp, we passed by in peace and camped about three miles from them. We had just made fires and were preparing our suppers, when suddenly the camp was surrounded by about two hundred indians. We gave them all the camp could spare in eatables and soon they went away whooping in their Indian fashion. I could tell volumns [volumes] of incidents which happened during this trek but time will not permit. But will say that after a great many days of travel and hardship we reached Salt Lake City on Friday October 5th 1851, with Captain Cardon's Company.

Source of Trail Excerpt: Stoddard, David Kerr, Autobiographical sketch. [Variant version of text also in Our Pioneer Heritage, 20 vols. (1958-77), 13:391]

- from Autobiographical Sketch, David Kerr Stoddard

 

". . . Friday July 11. Captn. Cordon a rose and Said he wished to make a few remarks and the first thing he wished to bring to Brethren’s mind was this that when we Come to place like we did to day he wanted every man when he had got out of danger to take his Cattle from his waggon and go and help the others and not lay down under the waggon or anchor his hind quarters in the waggon and get So lazey that they wished themselves Some where else and not let 6 waggons detain this Company an hour and three quarters as was the Case to day well he Said brethren the nex item of buisness I wish to Call your attention to and that is a Seperation wich is about to take place and thatis this, Captn. Easton and his ten has declared they would leave this Company because we did not travel fast enough for them. they have Some horse and ox teams that walk faster than ours and another excuse they had for leaveing was they had not provisions enough to last them and that they Could travel from 25 to 26 miles a day. they have done it and they Say they Can do it again. Captn. Cordon then gave him and his ten his mind on the Subject and that was this he did not want them to go and leave us but as long as they had taken a vote to leave amonst themselves he Said, go Brethren and let the responsibility rest on your on Shoulders for Said he I want no man nore Set of men that Cannot be united with us to Stay with us for we want no growlers here and every man that is not Satisfied with our mode of travel we want him to go with Captn. Easton in the morning[.] he Said I have been watching the Spirit of that Company for this Some time and I new it would Come to a Sepparation for the Spirit manifested it Self as not being united with this Company and Said he i want that man that Said he would go if he Could get any one to follow him and not Stop to Cook and wash he wanted to Shove ahead[.] well now their is a Chance for him to go allso and i want he Should go for Such big headedmen as him we do not want with us for Said he every man knows that it was right to Stop on that day for our wives done up their little domesticks and our waggons got sweetend and our Cattle got rested and we have gained more by it than we Should had we kept on our course. the Brethren Said we have done well by Stoping on that day. the Captn. Said that Captn. Easton had Shown a Spirit of none Confidence to him not only once but twice and a third time and Captn.. Easton Said that that Captn. Cordon had a wrong imprishion with regard to his Confidence. he Said he had the best of feelings for this Company and Said he allways had for any of the Latter day Saints and he was verry Satisfide with Captn. Cordon and he Could Say that he had the most Confidence in Captn. Cordon and allways had Since he got acquainted with him. Brother Cordon Said he would Stick by those that would Stick to him and he wanted every man to Stay with him untill all the tens Say it is wisdom to Seperate. Said he i go in for union all the time and if we are united we shall role into the Valey in Safety. the meeting was then dismised by prayer Saturday July 12th. the morning is Cool and pleasant. our Sick are getting better. the wind blows Cool from the South and it has the appearance of a good day for traveling. we rolled out at 8.o.clock and we have had a Splended day for traveling and have Come 15 miles. our road to day has been verry hilly but they were first rate good hard roads. Captn. Easton and Company and George W Johnson roled out and left us this morning and when we Camped they were out of Sight when we Campedto day their is no wood but plenty of good warter ...

Wednesday July 23. the Camp were all full of business untill 10.o.clock. then the horn was blown and all assembled to See what was the matter. Captn. Cordon Come forward and Spoke with relation to Crossing the river and Said he want every team yoked up and th Start at 12.o.clock. each ten doubled team and half of the fifty rolled over at a time. we all Crossed it in one hour and thirty five minutes. we Come up with Easton’s Company and they have lost 9 horses. they applied to us for horses to go and hunt for theirs but our Captn. told them that they Could not have them, just as we Started to Cross the Stream Easton’s Company Croweded in with ours wich was not a very good trick and when they got in the middle of the river one waggon stopped and Commenced to Settle. we went to his assistance and pulled him out. if they had a listened to the Council of Brother Cordon they would now have had their horses and not have been a burthen to their Company. but men that will go Contrary to Council and think they are So Strong and Can go So verry fast on their own responsibility must take the lash at all times. we have Come to day with Crossing the river 8 miles and Camped where their is no wood but plenty of warter and good feed. Easton’s Company Come up after we had Carrelled and Camped a quarter of a mile a head of us.

Thursday July 24th. 6.o.clock Easton’s Company is out of Sight. 8.o.clock we hitched up and rolled out[.] we found Splended roads though it was over hills

Saturday Augst. 30th. the day Broke Clear and Cold and when we got up in Camp we found ice in our Buckets and pans and it was an eighth of an inch thick. we rolled out at 8.o.clock and traveled until dinner time and turned our Cattle out to Bait below the upper ferry. we Started again at 2.o.clock and Crossed the river and come about 4. miles and Camped about ½ mile frome the river. we have Come 12 miles to day. just after we Camped three men Come in frome the mountains and told us that Captn. Easton and Company was robed of their Horses and provisions and they were in a destitute Condition

- from Alfred Cordon Emigrating Company, Journal, 1851 June-Sept.

Organized initially as the 4th Ten in the 2nd Fifty of James W. Cummings's company, they left the company on 12 July to travel independently to Utah. They were dissatisfied with the pace of the company and were concerned that they would have enough provisions for the entire distance. They reached Salt Lake several weeks ahead of the Cummings company (on Sept 15, 1851).

Memoirs of William Laird Adam

We were only able to make eight or ten miles a day and winter was on us. It must have been early October and there was a strong frost every night. We were only some 116 miles from Salt Lake City. In due time we arrived in Salt Lake and were invited to the house of John Gray whose wife was a niece of my father.

There were some discontents in Utah even then, but it was good policy to say little. Father used to say "Best be very quiet while you are under the lions paw". In a quiet way some would intimate a trip to California would be very desirable.

- from the Memoirs of William Laird Adam, California Pioneer, 1836-1903

Mormon Leader Brigham Young saw Southern California as a supply source for the salt flats of Utah, and as an immigration and mail stop between Salt Lake City and San Pedro, California. A group of almost 500 Mormons left Utah for California in 1851. They found abundant water in the valley, along with willows, sycamores, cottonwood and mustard, as well as the Yucca plant. The Mormon contingent was led by Captain David Seely (later first Stake President), Captain Jefferson Hunt and Captain Andrew Lytle, and included Apostles Amasa M. Lyman and Charles C. Rich. They first made camp at the Sycamore Grove, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) southeast of the present Glen Helen Regional Park. They stayed until the sale of Rancho San Bernardino could be arranged. In September 1851, Lugo sold the Rancho to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons). The Rancho included most of modern San Bernardino among other areas, though part of the northern areas of the City were part of Rancho Muscupiabe. The price for 40,000 acres (160 km2) was $77,000 with $7,000 down. The Mormons built Fort San Bernardino at the site of the present county courthouse. Inside the fort, they had small stores, and outside, they grew wheat and other crops. They later moved outside the walls of the fort when feared-attacks did not materialize. The Mormon Council House was built in 1852. It was used as the post office, school, church, and was the county courthouse from 1854 to 1858. - from History of San Bernardino, California, Wikipedia

 

The Adam, Easton, Grant & Henderson families in California

James Easton, Margaret and Agnes Adam and their children and William Thom Adam and Margaret Thompson and their children all traveled from Cedar City to California in 1854. John Easton (son of James Easton and Margaret Adam Henderson) was born in California in 1856 (and would go by the name of John Henderson). James Easton and Agnes Adam and their family would eventually travel on to Oregon.

Read more about the Mormon Colonization of San Bernardino.

Drawing of San Bernardino, California c 1852
Drawing of San Bernardino, California c 1852

 

1852 ..........

Isabella Henderson & William Nish

Isabella Henderson (daughter of Margaret Adam and David Henderson) married William Nish (son of Thomas Nish and Elizabeth Penman) on Jan 1, 1852, in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had at least eight children: Margaret (born about 1853 in Utah); William (born about 1855 in Utah); Elizabeth (born about 1857 in California); Robert (born about 1862); Isabella (born about 1864); James Easton (born about 1867); John (born about 1869); and Fredrick (born about 1871).

Elizabeth Nish & Alvin Bemis Hancock | Robert Glen Nish & Isabell Shelley | Isabella Grace Nish & James Hilliard Poole
James Easton Nish & Isa Irene Osborn | John Grant Nish & Mary Ellen Bessant

 

Jemima Laird Adam & George Easton

Jemima Laird Adam (daughter of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) married George Easton (son of Robert Easton and Elizabeth Laird) on May 12, 1852, in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had at least eight children: Robert (born about 1853); William (born about 1855); Isabel (born about 1858); Elizabeth (born 1859); Emeline (born about 1861); George (born about 1863); Charles (born about 1866); and Alexander (born about 1868).

Robert Easton & Mary Florence Hoey | William Easton & Charlotte McLeran | Charles Easton & Amanda Eckhardt

George Easton - History of Santa Clara County
George Easton - History of Santa Clara County

 

 

Memoirs of William Laird Adam

After a long courtship commencing in St. Louis Mo, sister Jemima and George Easton got married about then or rather in the Fall of 1852 and after much opposition from stepmother. We had longing eyes toward California so the little log cabin at Cedar Posts was disposed of and in the early Fall and in the company of George Easton and family we started South. I surrendered my musket and turned in my last library book.

We got along alright until we came to Fillmore City where John Thompson and step mother wanted us to stay. Aleck and I wanted to go on with George and Jemima to Coal Creek. We could understand Thompson's motives and father, good old man, was in a quandary. Stepmother took what she could get her hands on, and Thompson stole what he could, so when we left Fillmore we had a rather light load, but we were happy to get away from that crowd on any terms. And so we journeyed on, Father, Aleck and I, Jemima was as good as she could be, helping us cook, etc. Our clothes were few and needed little attention but we were happy to have escaped Margaret...

Well after getting out of Fillmore we got to Cedar City, Iron County where we lived for one year.... Stepmother Margaret expressed a wish to come back and father and Aleck took a yoke of cattle and a light waggon and brought her to us.

- from the Memoirs of William Laird Adam, California Pioneer, 1836-1903

 

Map showing Fillmore City and Cedar City, Utah Territory c 1857
Map showing Fillmore City and Cedar City, Utah Territory c 1857

 

Memoirs of William Laird Adam

As the summer waned we were preparing to go to California. There had been a consecration law subscribed to by many who wished to go, and those who had subscribed to it were in trouble. This law was an agreement signing over to Brigham Young's heirs and successors all their property, their wives and children and we were told those who signed would not be allowed to go, and threats made by two young fellows that they might see us before we got to the Mountain Meadows. Well we got away in very light marching order, disposing of and giving away anything that would interfere with the journey. We went buy Iron Mountain, a peak of with every detached piece as heavy as so much cast iron and in two days we camped at Mountain Meadows where a young fellow named Al Clyde overtook us and told us of four or six waggons behind that would be up next day and that they wished very much that we would wait for them. We did so, and I being selected Captain of the herd and as such was all over the immediate neighborhood keeping the cattle together and gathering pine nuts off the trees that lined the canyon where the meadow and springs of water lay. It was a fine place for a camp, plenty of grass and water, fuel and nut pine and scent cedar...

After being joined by those who Al told us of, we numbered some twenty waggons. John Easton was selected Captain, and a good captain he made...

- from the Memoirs of William Laird Adam, California Pioneer, 1836-1903

 

Memoirs of William Laird Adam, 1903 (33 MB pdf)

 

Liverpool, England

We beg to inform the Saints intending to emigrate that we are now prepared to receive their applications for berths. Every application should be accompanied by the names, age, occupation, country where born, and £1 deposit for each one named, except for children under one year old. Although children under one year old have their passage free to New Orleans, their names and ages are required by us equally as much as other passengers’. The dietary scale may be expected in our next. Passengers must furnish their own beds and bedding, their cooking utensils, provision boxes, &c. Every person applying for a berth or berths should be careful to give their address very distinct, in order to insure the delivery of our answer to them by letter carriers.

By reference to STAR no. 32, it will be seen that £10 each was named as the lowest sum upon which single persons or families could be encouraged by us to emigrate from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake City; therefore persons not having that amount should apply for passage to New Orleans, as we do not purpose to ship any Saints but those who are prepared to go through to the Valley without detention.

Our first vessel will sail in the fore part of January 1853; and as soon as our arrangements are complete, the passengers for that ship will be notified when to be in Liverpool, and receive all further necessary information; the same routine will be observed in reference to the succeeding ship. Deposits may be forwarded until the close of the year, or later, as may hereafter be noticed.

- The Liverpool Star, Fall of 1852, Read more From Liverpool to Keokuk: The Mormom Maritime Migration Experience of 1853.

 

1853 ..........

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake Temple

 

James Gourley Widdison was born on Jan 12, 1853. - from death certificate

Margaret Fife married David Miller sometime after John Easton's death and before the 1860 US Census.

 

Janet Russell & Thomas Widdison

Janet Russell and Thomas Widdison and their children (Agnes, Hannah, Robert Russell, William Livingston and James Gourley) sailed from Liverpool, England, to New Orleans, Louisiana, on March 28, 1853, aboard the Falcon. James Campbell Livingston (born Dec 2, 1833, in Shotts, Lanarkshire) was also aboard the same ship. James would later marry the Widdison sisters (in a plural marriage). They arrived in New Orleans on May 18 and in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Oct 16, 1853. - from A Sketch in the Life of the Thomas Widdison Family of Scotland and England

Agnes Widdison & James Campbell Livingston | Hannah Widdison & James Campbell Livingston
Robert Russell Widdison & Lois Savona Thompson | William Livingston Widdison & Mary Alice Wilding
James Gourley Widdison & Alice Pinney

 

The Falcon

Ed. Note: The Falcon, built by Gibbs & Co. in 1852, was a ship registered in Liverpool of 1640 tons used on the Liverpool to Port Philip & Adelaide route and in 1853 on the Liverpool to New Orleans route.

March 26, Falcon, 900 tons, Capptain Wade, President Cornelius Bagnall
Samuel W. Richards Agent, 1853
March 26, Falcon, 900 tons, Capptain Wade, President Cornelius Bagnall
From Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, Frederick Piercy, 1853

 

". . . On Saturday 12th of March I got notification to be in Liverpool to sail with the Falcon on the 28th of March. Sailing vessels were very scarce that year as the "gold fever" had broken out in Australia and all were going there. On Saturday 19th, I left Glasgow with about 100 Saints to sail on the same vessel. I was a little sick on the way to Liverpool. I watched the luggage at night on the steamer. On the 20th we arrived in Liverpool where I found lodgings at Mrs. Gellian's. On March 21st we removed our luggage to sheds on the Bramly [Bramley] Moor Dock. I watched the luggage part of the night. That same day I went to the office and paid the other four pounds for my passage. We watched our luggage by turns until Monday the 28th of March when we sailed out of Liverpool. It was a fine day but cold.

- from the Autobiography of James Ririe in Liverpool to New Orleans aboard the Falcon March 28, 1853 to May 18, 1853

 

"My mother died when I was five years old, and I was cared for by my stepmother, Jean Bain, until I was fifteen years old, at which time, namely February 1849, my stepmother died, and in April 1849, my father died. They died of cholera during the epidemic of that dread disease in Scotland at this time. I was the oldest of six children, the youngest, William, being then only nine months old. My brother, Charles, and myself, worked and supported the other children. My grandmother acting the part of a kind and affectionate mother to us all.

On May 7th, 1849 I was baptized by Elder Paul Gourlay and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. I was ordained a teacher by Elder Robert Baird in the year 1850, and I was also ordained a Priest by Elder James Letham in the year 1851. In the spring of 1853 it was considered wise for me to emigrate to Zion. My brother Charles assumed the care of the family and on March 15th I sailed from Glasgow, and on the 28th left Liverpool on the good ship Falcon, via New Orleans. We were nine weeks and two days on the sea.

- from the Autobiography of James Campbell Livingston

 

"Tuesday 29th. This morning I got up about 6 o'clock for prayers but after getting my clothes almost on I felt very sick and had to return to my bed again. I vomited considerable and being at the fore end of the ship [p. 47] I was brought down to about the center to sleep with Brother [James] Livingston for convenience of him waiting on me, and where the ship did not heave so much. I continued sick all that day and dept vomiting now & then. I understood that there was two marriages this day but I was unable to attend them.

Wednesday 30th. I continued sick all this day and could eat nothing but drank water & vomited it up again. Weather was still very tame.

Thursday 31st. I was still sick. I could take no meat. This day a child died aged 11 months. In the evening the wind began to rise & about 7 o'clock all in a sudden the ship commenced [p. 48] to rock & dart at such a rate and the tins tumbling back & forward, and also the boxes, for there was few of them tied for we was not looking for a storm, & when the chests began to tumble, them that was not in bed nor prepared for had to rush into bed clothes & all. Brother Livingston came running into the bed beside me while I lay sick. Shoes & all on, & Sister Widdison had went to her bed in the same way, the hoses was put on and left us all in the dark while the chests continued to dash from one side of the ship to the other in great fury. In the waves was dashing over the ship & was running in at the seams of the boat at a [p. 49] considerable rate which terrified some of the women & children. It continued in this way till about morning when it got a little tamer.

- From the Diary of James Leatham in Liverpool to New Orleans aboard the Falcon March 28, 1853 to May 18, 1853

Liverpool to New Orleans aboard the Falcon March 28, 1853 to May 18, 1853

List of Passengers arrived from Foreign Ports in the Port of New Orleans, Quarter 1853
List of Passengers Arrived from Foreign Ports in the Port of New Orleans, Quarter 1853
T. Widdison (45), R. Widdison (8), W.L. Widdison (6).
It seems that only males were listed...
See original document


Passenger List, New Orleans, Louisiana, May 18, 1853
Thos Widdison (45), Filecutter, Janet Widdison (39), Agnes Widdison (21), Hannah Widdison (14), Robt Widdison (8)
On the following page are William L. Widdison (6) and James Widdison (infant)
See original document

In 1853, a Yellow Fever epidemic killed 7,848 people in New Orleans, Louisiana.

From Epidemic Yellow Fever at New Orleans, La. in 1853, by E. D. Fenner, M.D.
From History of the Epidemic Yellow Fever at New Orleans, La. in 1853, by E. D. Fenner, M.D., 1854

 

St. Louis, Missouri, Daguerreotype by Thomas Easterly, 1852
St. Louis, Missouri, Daguerreotype by Thomas Easterly, 1852

 

"May 30th. Keokuk Camp by the great "Father of Rivers." I took a look upon this goodly land and remember the poor and oppressed scattered in the barren wilderness. I feel truly thankful to the Lord, I enjoy a tolerable good measure of health, and pray that God will gather his people from the four corners of the Earth unto Zion.

- From the Autubiography of Peter McIntyre in Liverpool to New Orleans aboard the Falcon March 28, 1853 to May 18, 1853

 

"We went up the Mississippi River to Keokuk a few miles below Nauvoo, the outfitting place for the emigration across the plains. We stopped at this place several weeks, breaking cattle and organizing companies for the great journey to the rocky Mountains. At this place I was detailed to guard and herd cattle as they were brought from the outfitting trains. While herding stock nearly opposite Nauvoo on the Iowa side of the river in company with R.W. Attwood, I had the pleasure of visiting the Mansion House at Nauvoo and spent the night there with Emma Smith and her children by Major Biddaman the man to whom she was married after the death of the Prophet. Our stay there was made a very pleasant one through the kindness of Major Biddaman who took us in his carriage to view the home of Brigham Young, and several of the twelve apostles including the home of Joseph Smith. The Temple had been burned but part of the walls were standing, and we were much interested even in the ruins.

- from Livingston, James Campbell, Autobiographical sketch, 1.


Ruins of the Temple at Nauvoo
From Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, Frederick Piercy, 1853

About 200 individuals and about 22 wagons were in the Appleton M. Harmon Company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at either Keokuk, Iowa or Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs). This company crossed the Missouri River on 14 July 1853. Janet Russell, Thomas Widdison and their five children were among this group of Mormon pioneers.

The Keokuk Encampment and Outfitting Ten Wagon Trains for Utah 

Map showing St. Louis, Nauvoo, Keokuk, Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters, 1853
Map showing St. Louis, Nauvoo, Keokuk, Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters, 1853
From Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, Frederick Piercy, 1853

Council Bluffs Ferry & Groups of Cottonwood Trees
Council Bluffs Ferry & Groups of Cottonwood Trees
From Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, Frederick Piercy, 1853

 

"During the westward journey we traveled in Appleton Harmon's company and he was a faithful Captain. He appointed my father as hunter for the company. Father would go ahead of the wagon train and when he could find buffalo close to the road, he would shoot one down and wait for the wagon train to divide it up. The Cholera was in the wagon train in front of us, and the one behind us, and the Captain advised that we use as little meat as possible.

- from Barrus, B. F., "Biography of Barrus Family," Tooele Transcript Bulletin, 26 Jan. 1923.

 

"The Indians were on the war path. Once we were stopped by them. It seemed to me there were a thousand of them. They could easily have killed us, but the men gave them provisions, robbing themselves, and we all suffered through dividing with them. There were seven deaths in our company... The buffalo were so numerous we had to stop for them to pass. There was no going till they crossed the road. We children had to walk most of the way.

- from Boren, Lucina Mecham, History of Lucina Mecham Boren. (Trail excerpt transcribed from "Pioneer History Collection" available at Pioneer Memorial Museum [Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum], Salt Lake City, Utah).

 

"We traveled up the Platte River, where I first saw wild Indians, the Potterwotamu tribe. One day about noon we saw four or five hundred very wild-looking Indians running across the prairie toward us. They came to a halt in front of our wagon, threw spears and tomohawks, drew their bows, threatening to shoot if we did not stop. They presented a dreadful sight, painted red and black, and their warwhoops were shreikingly fearful. They demanded the oxen, ten sacks of flour and five sacks of sugar to let us pass, but our Captain made signs on his fingers denoting one ox, one sack of sugar and one sack of flour. They finally consented. I will never forget how savage and wild they looked as we passed through their ranks. We had no further trouble with the Indians until we reached the Sioux country, where we had to make a second donation. But our Captain said that President Brigham Young told him it was better to feed the Indians than to fight them.

Now we traveled along the bank of the Platte River and passed many Indian camps. In one camp I saw a white girl about twelve years of age. She was dressed well, but could not speak English. No doubt she had been taken captive from some wagon train they had burned and destroyed and from people whom they had massacred.

We passed many lonely graves by the roadside with Buffalo heads as markers, the inscription having been made with black paint on the white skull. This was a source of grief and pity to me. There was a man by the mane of Savin with the company. He had a light wagon and a pair of horses and could, and did, travel miles ahead of the wagon train. Mr. Savin was a geologist and liked to pick up curious specimen of rock which he would find along the roadside. He seemed not to sense the danger but one day, sad to relate, we found him lying by the road, scalped and with a half dozen arrows in his body. He was dead, his horse was gone and his wagon had been burned. I shall never forget that sight.

- from Chamberlain, John Marvin, Reminiscences [c. 1925], [2-5].

 

Elk Horn River Ferry
Elk Horn River Ferry
From Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, Frederick Piercy, 1853
 

"...There is a good spirit generally amongst the saints here, and we travel along pretty comfortable. All are anxious to reach the valley, before the snow falls if possible, if not we shall endeavor to bear all that comes with patience. Bro. Babbit is in a great hurry and we must conclude with our best wishes and kind regard to all. Yours truly in the bonds of the gospel. John Brown & A.M. Harmon

- from Brown, John, and A. M. Harmon to Brigham Young, 17 Sept. 1853, in Brigham Young, Office Files 1832-1878, reel 32, box 22, fd. 21.

 

Great Salt Lake City in 1853
Great Salt Lake City in 1853
From Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, Frederick Piercy, 1853
 

"I arrived in Salt Lake City October 16, 1853 having been seven months on the journey in Captain Appilton [Appleton] Harmon’s Ox Team Company. I traveled from the Mississippi River and drove an ox team the entire distance walking and fording rivers and streams. The Lord blessed me by sea and by land for which I was very thankful especially for the good health I enjoyed.

- from Livingston, James Campbell, Autobiographical sketch, 1.

"the first house they were in was the home of Elizabeth Gray, Grandma's sister..."

Janet Russell and Thomas Widdison and their five children (Agnes, Hannah, Robert, William and James) also arrived into Salt Lake City on Oct 16, 1853. It is interesting to note that "the first house they were in was the home of Elizabeth Gray, Grandma's sister..." - from A Sketch in the Life of the Thomas Widdison Family of Scotland and England

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe and her son Andrew had emigrated from Scotland in 1844. Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe may have met John Gray in St. Louis or in Nauvoo.

 

Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley, by Frederick Piercy (30 MB pdf)

 

1854 ..........

Agnes Widdison & James Campbell Livingston

Nine months after arrival in Salt Lake, Agnes Widdison (daughter of Janet Russell and Thomas Widdison) married a young man that she had probably known since her childhood. James Campbell Livingston was born in the same town as Agnes, in Shotts, Lanark, Scotland. He went to the same branch of the church as Agnes, and they came to America on the same ship. James indicated that they were nine weeks and two days on the sea and then went up the Mississippi River to Keokuk, a few miles below Nauvoo for outfitting to cross the plains. Agnes and James were married at the ages of 23 and 20 respectively, on June 7, 1854 by Bishop John Lytle of the Seventh Ward. Three years later, on March 13, 1857, they were both endowed and then sealed for time and eternity in the New Endowment House. - from Agnes Widdison

Dry Goods and Groceries in Early Utah - An Account Book View of James Campbell Livingston

 

1855 ..........

"called to strengthen the number of Mormon residents in Carson Valley"

On May 17, 1855, Orson Hyde, apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, prominent Mormon colonizer and newly appointed Probate Judge of Carson County, Utah Territory, left Salt Lake City for Carson Valley. His company included George F. Stiles (also Styles), judge of the Third Federal District Court that included Carson Valley; United States Marshal Joseph L. Heywood; and 36 Mormon colonizers who had been "called to strengthen the number of Mormon residents in Carson Valley". - From The Mormons in Nevada, Las Vegas Sun, 1979

The 1862 Nevada Territorial Census lists a John Gray in the Ormsby Militia, but the full census shows a John Grey, 26, so this may not be "our" John Gray. The full census also lists an Orren Clemens. This would be Samuel Clemens brother Orion who had been appointed by Abraham Lincoln as Secretary of Nevada Territory. Also listed on the full census are a number of "characters" from Mark Twain's  "Irish Brigade" from Roughing It, including John and Thomas Nye.

 

1856 ..........

John Grant

At age 18, John (Grant) left his Uncle George Easton’s home in Southern California to seek his fortune. For much of his early years, John was a nomadic loner, never staying more than three or four years in one place. He farmed in the Gilroy and Redwood City areas, traveled north to Idaho to work as a teamster hauling freight between Boise and the mining camps up the Fraser River. He quit when his chuck wagon horse drowned in the river. He then drove a herd of cattle back to California, which he sold for a profit at Visalia. He then went to work in the mines at Mount Diablo, hoping to double his profit. He went broke and quit while in debt to the mine. - from Profile of a pioneering family: Grant Family Homestead

 

1857 ..........

San Bernardino, California

Their prosperity increased, and their religion flourished up to the Fall of 1857
Their prosperity increased, and their religion flourished up to the Fall of 1857...
From the New York Times, Dec 12, 1867

 

1859 ..........

Salt Lake City, Utah

In 1859, a stone quarry was established at the mouth of the canyon on the north side of the creek to provide granite for the construction of the Salt Lake Temple. The quarry operated intermittently from 1860 to 1870, when James C. Livingston was sent to the quarry to establish a permanent operation. In 1874, the Church quarrymen moved one and one half miles further into the canyon following the route of the newly constructed railroad to its terminus at Fairfield Flat to a site where the stones were large and numerous and seemed to be of a higher grade material than those at the mouth of the canyon. The town of Wasatch was established at the terminus site not far from the quarry. The town grew from 13 people in 1874 to 300 people in 1883. The town flourished until the quarry discontinued operation in 1893 when the temple was completed. However, the remains of Wasatch continues today as Wasatch Resort, with several summer homes as well as some year around homes dotting the landscape. - from History of the Granite Community

 

San Bernardino, California

In 1859, a large number of the original owners returned...
In 1859, a large number of the original owners returned...
From the New York Times, Dec 12, 1867

 

1860 ..........

John Gray and The Morrisites

Joseph Morris
Joseph Morris

Joseph Morris, prophet and leader of the Morrisites, was born in 1817 and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints when he was twenty-three years old while he was living in England. He married Mary Thorpe and brought her to America, where they resided in St. Louis for two years. Moving to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Joseph became the local Mormon congregation's branch president. Morris and his family immigrated to Utah in 1853 and resided for a time in Sanpete County, subsequently moving to Provo, and then Slaterville, before settling in the small community of South Weber.

He claimed to have received numerous spiritual manifestations, but it was in 1857 before he recorded his first official revelation. This revelation established Morris's prophetic calling, placing him at odds with the leadership of the Mormon Church, designated him as the seventh angel of the apocalypse, outlined ten steps to godhood, explained the doctrine of reincarnation, and proclaimed the "immediate" second coming of Christ. Morris also taught that Brigham Young was a fallen prophet and that no more Mormon missionaries should be sent into the world.

Gathering a few followers in Slaterville, Morris moved to South Weber, where he converted Mormon bishop Richard Cook. About two hundred former LDS Church members subsequently became disciples of Morris. In February 1861 Morris, Cook, and fifteen others were excommunicated from the Mormon Church by apostles John Taylor and Wilford Woodruff. On 6 April 1861 Joseph Morris organized a new church, headquartered in South Weber, and issued a proclamation that all of his followers should gather at Kingston Fort. Firmly believing that "Christ will come tomorrow," they held all things in common and, according to some authorities, even trampled some of their crops into the ground as evidence of their faith. - from The Morrisites

John Gray was one of his followers.

See the Roll of Membership, Names of Persons Baptized into the Fulness of the Gospel

 

1860 United States Federal Census - Great Salt Lake City
Janet Russell & Thomas Widdison and their family
 

Name: Janet Widdison
Age in 1860: 47
Birth Year: abt 1813
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Household Members:
Name Age
Thomas Widdison 54
Janet Widdison 47
Anna Widdison 21
Robert Widdison 16
William Widdison 14
James Widdison 7

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M653_1313; Page: 277; Image: 286; Family History Library Film: 805313. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.

Thomas Widdison's occupation is "file cutter".

The 1860 US Census for the County of Great Salt Lake, July 19th, 1860
The 1860 US Census for the County of Great Salt Lake, July 19th, 1860, showing Janet Russell Widdison

1860 United States Federal Census - Great Salt Lake City
Elizabeth Russell & John Gray and their family

Name: Elizabeth Grey
Age in 1860: 40
Birth Year: abt 1820
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: Great Salt Lake City Ward 17, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Gender: Female
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Household Members:
Name Age
John Grey 37
Elizabeth Grey 40
Andrew Grey 20
Isabella Grey 13
Robert Grey 8
William Grey 6

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Great Salt Lake City Ward 19, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M653_1313; Page: 277; Image: 286; Family History Library Film: 805313. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.


The 1860 US Census for the County of Great Salt Lake, July 19th, 1860, showing Elizabeth Russell Gray

1860 United States Federal Census - Great Salt Lake City
Agnes Widdison & James Livingston and their family
 
Name: James C Levingston
Age in 1860: 26
Birth Year: abt 1834
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: Great Salt Lake City Ward 20, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Gender: Male
Post Office: Great Salt Lake City
Household Members:
Name Age
James C Levingston 26
Agnes Levingston 29
Janet Levingston 5
James Levingston 2
Archibald Levingston 1week

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Great Salt Lake City Ward 20, Great Salt Lake, Utah Territory; Roll: M653_1313; Page: 293; Image: 303; Family History Library Film: 805313. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.

Archibald George Livingston was born May 31, 1860, in Salt Lake City, Utah to James Campbell Livingston and Agnes Widdison. He married Temperance Lucinda Gillespie on August 8, 1878 in the Endowment house in Salt Lake City, Utah. They were living in Fountain Green, Sanpete County, when their first child was born (in 1879). - from Archibald George Livingston

1860 United States Federal Census - Pajaro, Santa Cruz, California
William Thom Adam & Margaret Thomson and their family
 

Name: WilliamAdam
Age in 1860: 64
Birth Year: abt 1796
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: Pajaro, Santa Cruz, California
Gender: Male
Post Office: Watsonville
Household Members:
Name Age
William F Adam 64
Margret Adam 38
John Adam 7
James Adam 5
Agnes Adam 5
William Adam 23
Alexander Adam 20

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Pajaro, Santa Cruz, California; Roll: M653_66; Page: 529; Image: 5; Family History Library Film: 803066. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.


William T. Adam (64), Margaret (38), John (7, and born in Utah), James (5) and Agnes (5).
See original document

 

1860 United States Federal Census - San Bernardino, California
Margaret Adam Henderson and her children
 
Name: Margaret Henderson
Age in 1860: 43
Birth Year: abt 1817
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California
Post Office: San Bernardino
Household Members:
Name Age
Margaret Henderson 43
David Henderson 18
Jennett Henderson 16
Mary Henderson 13
John Henderson 4

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California; Roll: M653_64; Page: 642; Image: 28; Family History Library Film: 803064. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.

John was born in California and is the son of James Easton
Alex Easton and his family were also living in San Bernardino at this time
 
Read more about John Henderson (son of Margaret Adam Henderson and James Easton) from History of San Bernardino and Riverside counties / with selected biography of actors and witnesses of the period of growth and achievement. (Volume 2) - Brown, John

1860 United States Federal Census - San Bernardino, California
Isabella Henderson (daughter of Margaret Adam and David Henderson) and William Nish

Name: Wm Nish
Age in 1860: 28
Birth Year: abt 1832
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California
Gender: Male
Post Office: San Bernardino
Household Members:
Name Age
Wm Nish 28
Isabella H Nish 24
Margaret Nish 7
Wm Nish 5
Elizabeth Nish 3

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California; Roll: M653_64; Page: 642; Image: 28; Family History Library Film: 803064. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.

 
 
San Bernardino, California c. 1865
San Bernardino, California c. 1865
 
Read about the Mormon Settlement at San Bernardino, California, NY Times, Dec 12, 1867
 
1860 United States Federal Census - Gilroy, California
James Easton & Agnes Adam and their family
 
Name: James Easton
Age in 1860: 37
Birth Year: abt 1823
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
Gender: Male
Post Office: Gilroy
Household Members:
Name Age
James Easton 37
Agnes Easton 36
Margaret Easton 11
Agnes Easton 8
James Easton 7
Charlie Easton 2
Jemima Easton 1

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California; Roll: M653_65; Page: 244; Image: 244; Family History Library Film: 803065. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.

1860 United States Federal Census - Gilroy, California
Alexander Easton & Mary McDougal and their children

Name: Alex Easton
Age in 1860: 42
Birth Year: abt 1818
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California
Gender: Male
Post Office: San Bernardino
Household Members:
Name Age
Alex Easton 42
Mary Easton 40
John Easton 12
George Easton 7
Isaac Easton 4
Martha Easton 2
Cyrus Clifton 25

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California; Roll: M653_64; Page: 642; Image: 28; Family History Library Film: 803064. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.

1860 United States Federal Census - Gilroy, California
Jemima Adam & George Easton and family
 

Name: Geo Easton
Age in 1860: 31
Birth Year: abt 1829
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1860: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
Gender: Male
Post Office: Gilroy
Household Members:
Name Age
Geo Easton 31
Jemima Easton 20
Robert Easton 7
William Easton 5
Isabel Easton 2
Elizabeth Easton 11/12
Elizabeth Laird 66

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California; Roll: M653_65; Page: 242; Image: 242; Family History Library Film: 803065. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1860 United States Federal Census, the Eighth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age as of the census day, sex, color; birthplace, occupation of males over age fifteen, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1860 Federal Census.

 

William Laird Adam & Elizabeth O'Conner

William Laird Adam (son of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) married Elizabeth O'Conner on Nov 29, 1860, in San Jose, California. They had at least ten children: William Conner (born Sept 16, 1861); Mary Conner (born about 1862); Isabel (born about 1864); James Eugene (born Oct, 1865); Charles Augustus (born Dec, 1867); Thomas B. (born Aug 20, 1870); Anastasia (born about 1871); Kenneth (born about 1874); Katharine (born about 1876); Carlyle Alexander (born March 5, 1881); and Annie Elizabeth (born about 1886). - Glenda Waugh

William Conner Adam & Ada Kelley | Isabel Adam & Patrick Henry Sheehy | James Eugene Adam & Mary Aloysius Donovan
Charles Augustus Adam & Mary J. Porter | Thomas B. Adam & Grace Thornburgh | Anastasia Adam & Isaac J. Porter
Katherine Adam & Joseph A. Rembusch | Carlyle Alexander Adam & Anna May Laffey | Annie Elizabeth Adam & Charles Leo Preisker

See The Descendants of William Laird Adam

 
 
1861 ..........

The Civil War
1861 - 1865

On April 12, 1861, the Confederate Army attacked the federal garrison at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. This was the beginning of the U.S. Civil War.

The Saints did not send men to the battlefields in the east to fight in the war, nor were they invited to do so. Some Utahns did go, but on an individual basis. Brigham Young believed that the dissolution of the Union would possibly be the end of the nation. The war was also seen by many Mormons as divine retribution upon the nation that had allowed the Saints to be driven from their homes, unprotected from the mobs, on several occasions. Following the departure of Cumming and Johnston, the troops at Camp Floyd also left by July 1861. This allowed the Saints to demonstrate their loyalty to the Union. Members of the Nauvoo Legion, the local militia, performed short-term volunteer service guarding the mail line. Another significant act of loyalty occurred when Brigham Young was given the privilege of sending the first message from Salt Lake City on the newly completed transcontinental telegraph in October 1861. His message to Lincoln: "Utah has not seceded, but is firm for the Constitution and laws of our once happy country."

In April 1862 President Lincoln asked Young to provide a full company of one hundred men to protect the stage and telegraph lines and overland mail routes in Green River County (now southern Wyoming).

In 1863 the people of Utah made their third attempt to achieve statehood. The Mormons chided their critics by reminding them that while many states were trying to leave the Union, Utah was trying to get in. This third petition was denied, however. In the meantime, a constitution was drafted for the proposed state of Deseret and a full slate of officers was elected with Brigham Young as governor. This "ghost" government of Deseret met for several years and, in many cases, made decisions that usually became law when the territorial legislature met officially.

While Utah did not achieve statehood, the withdrawal of the army, or the ability to influence the appointment of federal officials, the LDS Church generally thrived during the Civil War period. Converts still gathered and settlements continued to be established in the Great Basin. Brigham Young remained the respected leader of the Saints, and the church remained a viable, independent power. Utah Territory and its people, however, were inevitably less isolated. Compromise by both federal officials and church leaders during the Civil War helped to bring about a period of more peaceful coexistence in Utah.

- from The Civil War in Utah

 

1862 ..........

San Bernardino

David Glen Henderson & Matilda Caroline Hawker

In 1862 Mr. (David) Henderson married Miss Matilda Hawker, who was born July 27, 1845, at Melbourne, Australia (daughter of Thomas Hawker and Charlotte Stapley of England). They had eleven children: David (July 8, 1863 - Aug 5, 1953); Alexander (Oct 6, 1864 - April 6, 1951); William Penn (Sept 10, 1867 - April 18, 1968); Walter Scott (Nov 10, 1869 - July 26, 1964); Nettie Jeanette (March 1, 1872 - March 11, 1961); Charles Glen (1875 - Feb 21, 1882); Robert Roy (Nov 1, 1877 - May 2, 1938); Margaret (Dec 2, 1882 - Jan 12, 1936); Lottie Belle (1884-1976); Grover Cleveland (March 15, 1887 - June 17, 1970); and Earl Elmer (May 26, 1891 - Nov 13, 1964). - from Chloe Perdew

Nettie Jeanette Henderson & Joseph E. Perdew | Margaret Henderson & James Anderson | Lottie Belle Hendserson & William St. Claire

Directly after his marriage he bought five acres, but soon sold that and purchased twenty acres, both tracts being near San Bernardino. During 1864 - 65 he was engaged in placer mining on Lytle Creek, then a boom district, though his own luck as a miner failed him. In the fall of 1865 Mr. Henderson went to the coal mines at Mount Diablo in Contra Costa County, and remained there two years, getting good wages and returning with some capital. - from History of San Bernardino and Riverside Counties By: John Brown, Jr., 1922

 

Salt Lake City

East side of Main Street, with telegraph office, Salt Lake City, Utah, c. 1862
East side of Main Street, with telegraph office, Salt Lake City, Utah, c. 1862

 

James Campbell Livingston & Hannah Widdison

In 1862 James (James Campbell Livingston) entered into the Holy Order of Plural Marriage by marrying Agnes' sister Hannah Widdison on Feb 15, 1862, and in 1867 the three of them were privileged to receive their Second Endowments in the Endowment House from President Wells and Joseph F. Smith. But Hannah died suddenly (30 Dec. 1871) and Agnes raised her 4 children along with her own 7 children. A third wife was brought into the family, Annie Elizabeth Muir on Jan. 26, 1873. She was born 3 Feb. 1854, Salt Lake City, Utah, daughter of Thomas Walter Muir and Isabella Ann Samson. There were 18 children among the three wives. - from Agnes Widdison


James Campbell Livingston
From http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/4530667/person/-591771370

James Campbell is my name. Scotland is my nation. Zion shall be my dwelling place and pleasant habitation. There I shall live to see and hear the Prophet of the Lord send forth his word as flaming fire or as a two edged sword. - from James Campbell Livingston Millenial Star Records

 

The Morrisite War

Morris had received additional revelations indicating that Christ would come and deliver his followers just a few days after a spectacular pageant called "The Foreshadowing of the Kingdom of God Day," which was scheduled for 30 May 1862. Therefore Joseph Morris saw the appearance of the army in the middle of June as a certain sign that the time of the Second Coming was imminent. Upon arriving at the fort, Robert Burton instructed a Morrisite herdboy to deliver a message to his leader requesting their surrender. After growing weary of the Morrisites' delay in responding to his demands, Burton ordered two warning shots to be fired to speed up the decision. The second ball struck the plowed ground in front of the settlement and ricocheted into the fort itself, killing and maiming as it went.

Joseph Morris immediately received a revelation of comfort and reassurance while some Morrisites returned the fire, killing Jared Smith of the posse. On the third day of the siege, as the Morrisites were in the process of surrendering, hostilities again broke out and Joseph Morris, his counselor John Banks, and a few others were killed. The rest, seeing their leaders dead, surrendered. The prisoners, numbering about ninety, were taken to Salt Lake City to stand trial before Judge Kenney. They were then placed under bond to appear at the next session of court. In March 1863 seven of the Morrisites were convicted of murder in the second degree, sixty-six were convicted of resistance, and two were acquitted. However, the new territorial governor, Stephen S. Hardy, pardoned all of them, and the Morrisites scattered into Idaho, California, Nevada, Montana, and other places to begin their lives anew. Seven years later, in the midst of an upsurge of anti-Mormonism, Robert T. Burton was tried for the murder of Mrs. Isabella Bowman, one of two Morrisite women killed during the surrender proceedings, but was acquitted. The Morrisite war was officially over. - from The Morrisites

 

A white flag was waved in camp and [Robert Taylor] Burton, and his men, went down and disarmed them. After they were disarmed there was a large group of them standing together and Joseph [Morris] was talking to them, saying that he had taught them the principles of righteousness and he would like to know how many of them would stand by him to the death – when Burton spurred up his horse and tried to ride on to him saying “will you give up now? will you give up now?” when they had already given up and were disarmed. Joseph caught the horse by the bit and set him back upon his haunches, when [Burton] spurred him up again, saying “will your God deliver you now? We have had enough of your damned apostacy, we’ll try your God now” and then drew his pistol and shot [Morris] in the face. He reeled and fell dead. When a young woman who was standing by, holding in her arms the baby belonging to the woman who was killed by the first cannonball that was fired spoke up and said “you bloodthirsty hell hound what did you kill that good man for?” When [Burton] said “no woman can say that to me and live” and took deliberate aim at her and shot her dead too and someone else went up behind John Banks [ed. note: Banks was a former General Authority who had left LDS Church] and shot him in the back of the neck, but did not kill him. And it was said that he would probably have lived had it not been for some doctoring that he had during the night following. So after having gained such a glorious victory, they were ready to start home with all the men of the camp as their prisoners. - from the Journal of George Morris (brother of Joseph Morris)

 

1863 ..........

The John Gray Story

John Gray
John Gray
Reprinted from a tintype made in Ogden Utah
Courtesy Bill Hamill

According to Andrew Wardrobe's obituary, John Gray and his family moved from Salt Lake City to "California" in 1863. In the Supreme Court of the State of Utah, John Gray v. Amos Howe and Ann Smith, "the District Court found that John Gray was in the peaceable possession of the property until 1863, when he was forcibly removed by John T.D. McAllister" and "that he possessed and occupied the same up to March, 1863", and "in his declaratory statement he describes himself as being a resident of the State of Nevada". See original document The 1870 US Census has John Gray enumerated in both Alpine, California and Carson, Nevada.

It is well known that at the period of which I am writing, apostasy was a capital crime, and Gray was fortunate in getting out of the Territory alive. His wife knew this, and knew also that her own safety would be best secured by flight, so as soon as she was able to travel she made her way to Carson, Nevada, where she was was afterwards joined by her husband. - From Utah Justice, Mrs. A. G. Paddock, July 9, 1877

Ed Note: There was a John Caldwell Gray (a builder born May 24, 1820 in Massachusetts) with wife Elizabeth living in Salt Lake City in 1860, 1870 & 1880, who should not be confused with our John Gray (the Morrisite). The census records, historical documents and family lore all point to our John Gray as "the Morrisite". See John Caldwell Gray on page 38 in Biographical Encyclopedia or Condensed Biographical Sketches of Presiding Officers, Veterans, Missionaries and Other Active Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, By Andrew Jensen, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1888.

Pardon for Morrisites

From the History of Salt Lake City and It's Founders by Edward W. Tullidge
From the History of Salt Lake City and It's Founders by Edward W. Tullidge
... and to each of them full and perfect pardon
From the History of Salt Lake City and It's Founders by Edward W. Tullidge

 

John Gray

There was some problems while the family lived with the Mormons. One of the church elders "fell for" Elizabeth, who turned him down. The elder kicked her out of the house they were renting from him and put her furniture in the yard and took Robert and William in the stockade. When John Gray came home and found out what happened he moved the family into another house. - Eleaine Alberti, great-great-great granddaughter of Andrew Wardrobe

 

John Gray, NOTICE, United States Land Office, Salt Lake City, Dec 13th, 1873
NOTICE, United States Land Office, Salt Lake City, Dec 13th, 1873

Supreme Court of the State of Utah
John Gray v. Amos Howe and Ann Smith

John Gray v. Amos Howe and Ann Smith
See original document

Cruelties of the Mormon Thugs

The Case of John Gray, Abraham Taylor, June 2, 1877
The Case of John Gray, Abraham Taylor, June 2, 1877
Abraham Taylor, June 2, 1877
(Abraham Taylor was an "Apostle" of the Church of the First Born or Morrisites)

Concerning the Revelations
Concerning the Revelations
From The Spirit Prevails

Injustice - The Case of John Gray in the Supreme Court

Injustice - The Case of John Gray in the Supreme Court

UTAH JUSTICE
The Recent Triumph Over Poor John Gray

John Gray, Utah Justice, Mrs. A. G. Paddock, July 9, 1877
John Gray, Utah Justice, Mrs. A. G. Paddock, July 9, 1877
John Gray, Utah Justice, Mrs. A. G. Paddock, July 9, 1877
Mrs. A. G. Paddock, July 9, 1877

INJUSTICE
A Case in Which There was Little Law and Less Justice

John Gray Injustice, Layman, Aug 3, 1878
Layman, Aug 3, 1878

The Spirit Prevails
Men, Motives and Misunderstandings: A New Look at the Morrisite War of 1862
The Morrisites

 

1865 ..........

The Coal Mines at Mount Diablo, Contra Costa County, California

From the 1860s through the turn of the last century, five coal mining towns thrived in the Black Diamond area: Nortonville, Somersville, Stewartville, West Hartley and Judsonville. As the location of California's largest coal mining operation, nearly four million tons of coal ("black diamonds") were removed from the earth. The residents of the mining towns were from all over the world, and their life was characterized by hard work and long hours. Occasional celebrations and a variety of organizations and social activities served to alleviate the drudgery of daily existence. - from East Bay Regional Park District

In the fall of 1865, David Henderson "went to the coal mines at Mount Diablo in Contra Costa County, and remained there two years, getting good wages, and returning with some capital. - from History of San Bernardino and Riverside Counties By: John Brown, Jr., 1922

John W. Grant would work in the coal mines on Mount Diablo around this period of time. - from John W. Grant

James Easton and Agnes Adam were in Martinez, Contra Costa County, in the 1870 US Census.

 

The Black Hawk War
1865-1872

Growing frictions over land and resources led to Utah's most intense Mormon-Indian conflict, the Black Hawk War. The Utes and their allies killed around 75 Anglos; the Mormons in return killed many Indians. Both sides committed atrocities and killed many innocents before it was over. On April 9, 1865, a group of Utes and Mormon settlers met near Manti to resolve a quarrel. The Utes had stolen and eaten some of the Mormons' cattle.  During the talk, one of the settlers grabbed the one of the Indians and threw him down off his horse. This angered the Utes, including a young man named Black Hawk. This was the start of the Black Hawk War...
- From 1865 and beyond: The Black Hawk War

 


From History of Indian Depredations in Utah, by Peter Gottfredson, 1919 (21 MB pdf)
President Brigham Young, First Governor of Utah, "It is cheaper to feed them than to fight them"

 

This flag was carried by Mark Lindsey, of Captain James C. Livingston's Company under the command of Major Andrew Burt, which company was mustered into service July 25, 1866.
From History of Indian Depredations in Utah, by Peter Gottfredson, 1919 (21 MB pdf)

This flag was carried by Mark Lindsey, of Captain James C. Livingston's Company under the command of Major Andrew Burt, which company was mustered into service July 25, 1866.

"About the end of July Major-General Burton organized another company of seventy-five officers and men in Salt Lake County and hurried them southward under the command of Major Andrew Burt..."


Andrew Burt
Photo by CR Savage c 1870

History of Indian Depredations in Utah, by Peter Gottfredson, 1919 (21 MB pdf)

Andrew Burt "was later gunned down outside the Salt Lake House by a clearly insane (and possibly drunk) black man in 1883".  Chief Burt was shot and killed while investigating a report of a man shooting a gun. The suspect was upset about not getting a job at a local store and started to menace the owner with a pistol. As Chief Burt and another officer responded the man went to another location and obtained a .45 caliber Springfield rifle. When the Chief approached the man at 2nd South and Main Street the man shot Chief Burt in the chest. The suspect then shot and wounded the second officer before being taken into custody. An angry crowd gathered at the jail, forcibly removed the man, and then lynched him. Chief Burt had been in law enforcement for 24 years and was survived by his wife. - from Officer Down Memorial Page, Chief of Police Andrew H. Burt

Read another version about Andrew Burt as a policeman in Salt Lake City.

There were so many things to be taken care of in those days. Our father Robert had ended one of these five month trips in September and the next June 1867 he was called by Major Broomhead, to take part in the Black Hawk or Indian War. He was in Captain William Binders Company, stationed at Gunnison. He was gone three months, and 16 days. He was paid $212.00 for his services. Every Memorial day they place a flag on his grave. - from A Sketch in the Life of the Thomas Widdison Family of Scotland and England

See the Affidavit Concerning Service in Indian Wars by Robert Russell Widdison.
See the  Affidavit Concerning Service in Indian Wars for Charles Livingston.

Captain William Binder's Infantry Left Salt Lake City for Sanpete
From History of Indian Depredations in Utah, by Peter Gottfredson, 1919 (21 MB pdf)

The Black Hawk Indian War was the longest and most destructive conflict between pioneer immigrants and Native Americans in Utah History. The traditional date of the war's commencement is 9 April 1865 but tensions had been mounting for years. On that date bad feelings were transformed into violence when a handful of Utes and Mormon frontiersmen met in Manti, Sanpete County, to settle a dispute over some cattle killed and consumed by starving Indians. An irritated (and apparently inebriated) Mormon lost his temper and violently jerked a young chieftain from his horse. The insulted Indian delegation, which included a dynamic young Ute named Black Hawk, abruptly left, promising retaliation. The threats were not idle - for over the course of the next few days Black Hawk and other Utes killed five Mormons and escaped to the mountains with hundreds of stolen cattle. Naturally, scores of hungry warriors and their families flocked to eat "Mormon beef" and to support Black Hawk, who was suddenly hailed as a war chief...

The years 1865 to 1867 were by far the most intense of the conflict. Latter-day Saints considered themselves in a state of open warfare. They built scores of forts and deserted dozens of settlements while hundreds of Mormon militiamen chased their illusive adversaries through the wilderness with little success. Requests for federal troops went unheeded for eight years. Unable to distinguish "guilty" from "friendly" tribesmen, frustrated Mormons at times indiscriminately killed Indians, including women and children.

 - from the Black Hawk War

"Dear Sir: - I am glad to comply with your request to give some items of history of some of the Indian troubles in and near Round Valley (Scipio) and in the following narrative I am sure some of the eroneous stories told in regard to the death of Black Hawk, the great Indian Chief, and also Panacara, an inoffensive Indian who made his home in Round Valley, may be corrected and the truth of the matter to the people in your proposed history of the Indian troubles of early Utah days. There are probably a dozen men in Utah claim the honor of killing Black Hawk, none of which is true..." Read more from A Letter from William Probert extracted form History of Indian Depredations in Utah

 

Colonel Heath's Treaty with Indians in Strawberry Valley
From History of Indian Depredations in Utah, by Peter Gottfredson, 1919 (21 MB pdf)

 

Salt Lake City, 1869
Salt Lake City, 1869

 

1867 ..........

"Body guards to President Brigham Young"

James C. Livingston became superintendent of the church quarries at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon from which the granite for the Salt Lake Temple was being quarried. This was about the year 1867. He continued to hold this position until the capstone of the temple was laid in the year 1890... James C. Livingston early made the acquaintance of Bishop John Sharp and they were fast friends until the death of Bishop Sharp on December 23, 1891. They worked together in the quarries getting out stone for the tabernacle and other buildings. These two men together with Andrew Smith and other trusted and true men were body guards to President Brigham Young. - from information from James A. Muir compiled by William D. Kuhre, Sandy, Utah, Dec 12, 1935, in James Campbell Livingston

Read more about the Granite for the Temple.

 

Carson City, Nevada

Sometime between 1860 and 1867 Elizabeth Russell, John Gray, Andrew Wardrobe and William and Isabella Gray moved from Salt Lake City to Carson City Nevada. Andrew Wardrobe's obituary indicates they moved to California in 1863 and "joined the gold seekers". In the 1870 US Census he was enumerated in both Carson City, Nevada and Alpine, California, and both he and John Gray were farmers.

 

U.S. Land Grant to John W. Gray of Ormsby County Nevada, June 15, 1867

U.S. Land Grant to John W. Gray of Ormsby County Nevada
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

Isabel Gray & Henry Clay Powers

Isabel Gray Powers
Isabel Gray Powers
Bio of Isabel Gray Powers
Henry Clay Powers
Henry Clay Powers
Bio of Henry Clay Powers

Isabel Gray (daughter of Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe and John Gray) married Henry Clay Powers (son of Isaac Powers and Alvira Sherwood) on Dec 24, 1867, in Carson City, Nevada. They had at least eleven children: Elizabeth Nevada (born Dec 14, 1869); Charles Henry (June 16, 1872 in Nebraska - Sept 4, 1959); William Russell (born Sept 8, 1874); Isaac Sherwood (born July 17, 1876); Maud May (May 1880-1967); Ida Delilah (Oct 20, 1881 - March 1, 1967); Margaret Cordella (born June 1884); Isabella Alvira (May 1886-1958); Harrison Henry (April 1888-1971); John Gray (Aug 1890-1971); and Andrew Robert (June 1892-1915). - from Burke Cortsen Family Tree on Ancestry.com and Glenda Waugh

Henry Clay Powers Family

Charles Henry Powers & Annie Christine Benson | William Russell Powers & Leonie Edella Conant
Isaac Sherwood Powers & Mary Ann Leavitt | Maud May Powers & George Guiles | Maud May Powers & L.A. Condit
Ida Delilah Powers & Herbert Marion Condit | Isabella Alvira Powers & John Burke
Harrison Henry Powers & Rocha Aurilla Hall | Harrison Henry Powers & Alice Roswurm McGraw

Henry Clay Powers Family Portrait
Henry Clay Powers Family Portrait
Photo courtesy of John Burke

Henry Clay Powers Family
Henry Clay Powers Family
Photo courtesy of John Burke


Photo courtesy of John Burke

John Thomas Burke and Isabella Alvira (Powers) Burke with five adult children. Back row L to R: John Henry Burke (my father), Donald Lee Burke, Ernest William Burke. Front row L to R: Dr. Genevra Genevieve Burke (Married name Baken, but changed back to Burke after divorce), John Thomas Burke, Isabella Alvira (Powers) Burke and Dorothy Elizabeth (Burke) Barksdale.

 

1868 ..........

Files Recut - Thomas Widdison

Files Recut - Thomas Widdison
Thursday, June 11, 1868 Paper: Salt Lake Daily Telegraph (Salt Lake City, UT) Volume: IV Issue: 293

 

Andrew Wardrobe

Andrew Wardrobe became a citizen of the United States of America on Oct 15, 1868, in Carson City, Ormsby County, Nevada.

Certificate of Citizenship, Andrew M. Wardrobe, Oct 15, 1868
Certificate of Citizenship, Andrew M. Wardrobe, Oct 15, 1868
See original document

 

John Grant & Margaret Nish

John Grant
John Grant
Photo courtesy Dole Holcombe Grant Family Tree on ancestry.com

John Grant (only surviving child of Robert Grant and Isabella Adam) married Margaret Nish (daughter of William Nish and Isabelle Henderson) in October, 1868 (Ed Note: Margaret was born in 1852) . Isabelle Henderson was the daughter of Margaret Adam Henderson and David Henderson. She had emigrated from Scotland with her brother William and  William Thom Adam (and his children) in 1850. John Grant and Margaret Nish had at least nine children: Isabelle (1869-1892); Robert (Oct 21, 1872 - Feb 23, 1955); John Nish (Jan 1, 1875 - April 15, 1954); Richard (1878 - Jan 11, 1937); Viva A (June 26, 1880 - March 12, 1966); Adam Lucas (Oct 11, 1881 - March 14, 1966); Frederick William (Dec 15, 1884 - March 22, 1974); Jessie Marie (1887 - May 1, 1931) and Archie J (Aug 17, 1890 - Oct 11, 1940). - from Morris Family Tree and Dole Holcombe Grant Family Tree on ancestry.com

Isabelle Grant & William Winfield Holcomb | Robert Bruce Grant & Christine Sulau | John Nish Grant & Myra Jane Bartron
Richard Grant & Exie Belle Sharpless | Viva Grant & Frank L. Anderson | Adam Lucas Grant & Clara Sulau
Frederick William Grant & Ina Fancher | Archie Grant & Mayble L. Hammond

Profile of a pioneering family: Grant Family Homestead

 

1869 ..........

John Gray

A John Gray filed a Declaration of Intention to Become an American Citizen in Carson City, Nevada, on Feb 19, 1869.  - From Carson City Recorder - Genealogy

 

James Campbell Livingston

Telegraph, April 7, 1869 "Jim Livingston, Sharp's able foreman, said nothing but went to work and loaded a point of rock with nitroglycerine, and without saying anything to the CP 'let her rip.' The explosion was terrific. The report was heard on the Dry Tortugas, and the foreman of the C P came down to confer with Mr. Livingston about the necessity of each party notifying the other when ready for the blast. The matter was speedily arranged to the satisfaction of both parties."

Telegraph, April 14, 1869, "impressive work on the Promontory is the massive CP fill on Farr & West's contract, along 500 feet and 170 feet deep has 250 teams and 500 men working last two months. Many workers from Cache county. Wm Fisher and Wm Lewis are supervisors, replacing Bishop Merrill. Thirty foot cuts being blasted on each side ? three mules killed in recent blast accident. James C Livingston genl overseer of this massive rock work, formerly at Weber Canyon, and well known for his champion law and order; runs strict camp. Nearby is trestle work being built by Hall & Casement for UP. The two lines and their cuts wind their way up the rocky slope a few feet apart."

 

1870 ..........

Robert Russell

Robert Russell (Janet and Elizabeth's brother) died of "spinal disease" (possibly related to lead poisoning and his trade as a file cutter) on Feb 3, 1870, in Larbert, Stirlingshire, Scotland, at the age of 50.

 

Manti, Sanpete, Utah

Margaret Easton (daughter of Robert Easton and Elizabeth Laird Easton) c. 1870
Margaret Easton (daughter of Robert Easton and Elizabeth Laird Easton) c. 1870

 

Carson City, Nevada

State Capitol Building, Carson City, Nevada, 1871
State Capitol Building, Carson City, Nevada, 1871

1870 United States Federal Census - Carson City, Nevada
Elizabeth Russell and John Gray and family
 

Name: Elizabeth Gray
Birth Year: abt 1818
Age in 1870: 52
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1870: Carson City, Ormsby, Nevada
Race: White
Gender: Female
Household Members:
Name Age
John Gray 50
Elizabeth Gray 52
Isabella Powers 23
Elizabeth Powers 5/12
A Wardrobe 30

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Carson City, Ormsby, Nevada; Roll: M593_834; Page: 256A; Image: 517; Family History Library Film: 552333. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data:

  • 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

  • Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age at last birthday, sex, color; birthplace, occupation, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1870 Federal Census.

There was a Henry C. Powers (25) living in Lee, Illinois in the 1870 Census.

John Gray's occupation is listed as "farmer" and Andrew Wardrobe's as "laborer".
Isabella Powers is her daughter Isabel who was 4 in the 1850 Census.

The 1870 US Census for Carson City, Nevada
The 1870 US Census for Carson City, Nevada

The Gray family was also enumerated just across the state line in California during the 1870 Census.

1870 United States Federal Census - Alpine, California
Elizabeth Russell and John Gray and family
 

Name: Andrew Wardrobe
Birth Year: abt 1842
Age in 1870: 28
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1870: Township 4, Alpine, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Household Members:
Name Age
John Gray 49
Elizabeth Gray 51
William Gray 16
Andrew Wardrobe 28

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Township 4, Alpine, California; Roll: M593_69; Page: 316A; Image: 22; Family History Library Film: 545568. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data:

  • 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

  • Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

Description:
This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age at last birthday, sex, color; birthplace, occupation, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1870 Federal Census.

Andrew Wardrobe was a "laborer" and William Gray was a "farm laborer".

 

1870 United States Federal Census - Ward 20, Salt Lake City, Utah
Janet Russell's daughters with their husband James Campbell Livingston
 
Name: James Livingston
Age in 1870: 34
Birth Year: abt 1836
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1870: Salt Lake City Ward 20, Salt Lake, Utah Territory
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Salt Lake City
Household Members:
Name Age
James Livingston 34
Hannah Livingston 31
Thomas Livingston 7
Agnes Livingston 5
William Livingston 2/12
Agnes Livingston 38
Jennette Livingston 15
James Livingston 11
George Livingston 8
Robert Livingston 5
Charles Livingston 3

Source Citation: Year: 1800; Census Place: Salt Lake City Ward 20, Salt Lake, Utah Territory; roll: M593_1611; Page: 716B; Image: 780; Family History Library Film: 553110. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age at last birthday, sex, color; birthplace, occupation, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1870 Federal Census.

Note: Janet Russell Livingston married Orson Augustus Despain and had 10 children. She passed away in 1900 in Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah, USA.

 

William D. Livingston
William D. Livingston
From Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1966


Charles Livingston
From Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1966

 

1870 United States Federal Census - Pajaro, Santa Cruz, California
Agnes Adam's brother William Thom Adam & Margaret Thomson and their family

Name: William Adam
Age in 1870: 77
Birth Year: abt 1793
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1870: Pajaro, Santa Cruz, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Watsonville
Household Members:
Name Age
William Adam 77
Margaret Adam 48
John Adam 16
James Adam 14

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Pajaro, Santa Cruz, California; Roll: M593_89; Page: 343A; Image: 13; Family History Library Film: 545588. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age at last birthday, sex, color; birthplace, occupation, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1870 Federal Census.

 

1870 United States Federal Census - Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
Jemima Adam (daughter of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) & George Easton and family

Name: George Easton
Age in 1870: 42
Birth Year: abt 1828
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1870: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Gilroy
Household Members:
Name Age
George Eaton 42
J Eaton 39
Robt Eaton 17
William Eaton 15
Isabella Eaton 13
Elizabeth Eaton 11
Emeline Eaton 9
George Eaton 7
Charles Eaton 4
Alexander Eaton 2
Alex Gray 25
Wm Larabee 20

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California; Roll: M593_88; Page: 99B; Image: 202; Family History Library Film: 545587. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age at last birthday, sex, color; birthplace, occupation, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1870 Federal Census.

 

1870 United States Federal Census - Santa Barbara, California
William Thom Adam's son William Laird Adam & Elizabeth Conner and their family

Name: Wm L Adam
Age in 1870: 33
Birth Year: abt 1837
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1870: Township 3, Santa Barbara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Aroyo Grande
Household Members:
Name Age
Wm L Adam 33
Elizabeth Adam 31
William Adam 9
Mary Adam 8
Isabella Adam 6
James Adam 4
Charles Adam 1

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Township 3, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: M593_87; Page: 508A; Image: 481; Family History Library Film: 545586. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age at last birthday, sex, color; birthplace, occupation, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1870 Federal Census.

Alexander Adam (30) was living next door

 

 
1870 United States Federal Census - Martinez, California
James Easton & Agnes Adam and their family
 
Name: James Easton
Age in 1870: 47
Birth Year: abt 1823
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1870: Township 3, Contra Costa, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Martinez
Household Members:
Name Age
James Easton 47
Agnes Easton 47
James Easton 17
Cherles Easton 12
John Easton 9

Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Township 3, Contra Costa, California; Roll: M593_71; Page: 414A; Image: 303; Family History Library Film: 545570. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, age at last birthday, sex, color; birthplace, occupation, and more. No relationships were shown between members of a household. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1870 Federal Census.

James (17) was born in Utah. Charles and John were born in California.

James and Agnes moved to Oregon sometime between 1870 and 1880.

 

1873 ..........

William Widdison

William Widdison (son of William Livingston Widdison and Mary Alice Wildling) was born on Dec 15, 1873, in Salt lake City. See A Sketch in the Life of William Livingston Widdison

 

1874 ..........

U.S. Land Grant to William Laird Adam of Santa Barbara County,  Sept 1, 1874

U.S. Land Grant to Wiliam Laird Adam of Santa Barbara County,  Sept 1, 1874
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

Salt Lake City

Widdison, Thomas, file cutter, with son William, teamster, and son's Robert and James, blacksmiths
Widdison, Thomas, file cutter, with son William, teamster, and son's Robert and James, blacksmiths
From Gazeteer of Utah and Salt Lake City directory, 1874 by Edward Lenox Sloan

Gary, Elizabeth, widow
Gray, Elizabeth, widow
From Gazeteer of Utah and Salt Lake City directory, 1874 by Edward Lenox Sloan

Ed. Note: "Our" John Gray died on 1896 and is buried in the Sublett Cemetery, Cassia County, Idaho. The 1874 Gazeteer of Utah and Salt Lake City lists an Elizabeth Gray, widow (above). There was also an Elizabeth Gray who was married to a John Caldwell Gray and with sons John and William. This John Gray died in 1898. There was also a John Gray (b. Oct 23, 1814) who died in Salt lake City on Jan 24, 1891.

 

Andrew Wardrobe & Isabella Slack

Andrew Wardrobe married Isabella Slack (born in England in 1856) on Nov 9, 1874. - from Ancestry.com ancestral file Isabella left Liverpool, England, aboard the John Bright on June 4, 1868, and arrived in New York City on July 14, 1868. - from Liverpool to New York June 4, 1868 In the 1870 US Federal Census the Slack family was living in Weston, Cache County, Utah Territory (in Idaho).

Andrew Wardrobe and Isabella Slack had at least fourteen children: Robert Slack (1875-1940); Elizabeth Nevada (1877-1944); Ella Nora (1879-1943); Agnes Jane (1881-1970); Mary Isabelle (1882-1964); Effie Caroline (1884-1961); William Slack (1887-1960); twins Andrew Charles (1889-1945) and John Henry (1889-1920); George Melvin (1891-1965); Jessie Myrtle (1893-); Drew (1896-); Dewey Ray (1897-1970); and Bruce Harold (1900-).  - Glenda Waugh

Elizabeth Nevada Wardrobe & Archie Leroy Tucker | Ellen Nora Wardrobe & Walter Benton Armstrong | Agnes Jane Wardrobe & Edgar M Bogart
Mary Isabelle Wardrobe & William Cunningham | Effie Caroline Wardrobe & Charles Rollin Spurbeck
Andrew Charles Wardrobe & Elaine Ann Heitfeld | John Henry Wardrobe & Adella Mildred Bogart
Jessie Myrtle Wadrobe & Frank Robey Blackburn | Bruce Harold Wardrobe & Olive Eve Mulalley

 

1875 ..........

William Thom Adam

William Thom Adam died on Jan 15, 1875, in Gilroy, Santa Clara County, California. - from Ancestry.com Family Trees


Died, Adam - In Gilroy, January 15, William Adam, aged 82
San Francisco Bulletin, January 27, 1875

 

U.S. Land Grant to John W. Grant of Santa Barbara County,  Nov 1, 1875

U.S. Land Grant to John W. Grant, Nov 1, 1875
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1876 ..........

Thomas Widdison

Thomas Widdison

Grandfather Thomas Widdison died on the 5th of May 1876, then grandmother lived with us for eleven years. We lived on the south half of this lot, and Uncle James built a brick house right on the corner. - from A Sketch in the Life of the Thomas Widdison Family of Scotland and England

See Thomas Widdison by Marie Widdison, a great great granddaughter

 

1877 ..........

James C. Livingston, superintendent of the Temple quarry

Thursday, January 4, 1877 Paper: Deseret Evening News (Salt Lake City, UT) Volume: X Issue: 36
Thursday, January 4, 1877 Paper: Deseret Evening News (Salt Lake City, UT) Volume: X Issue: 36

 

Alexander Adam & Esther Bradley

Left to Right: Ronald McDonald Adam, Esther Spencer Bradley Adam, Alexander Adam, William A. Adam. Abt. 1890.
Left to Right: Ronald McDonald Adam, Esther Spencer Bradley Adam, Alexander Adam, William A. Adam. Abt. 1890.
Photo courtesy Donna Conner

Alexander Adam (son of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) married Esther Spencer Bradley Feb 11, 1877. They had two children: William Alexander (born 1877); and Ronald McDonald (born Sept 8, 1884).

Ronald McDonald Adam & Malinda Jane Hardenbrook

'Aleck' was the youngest of William Thom of Lanarkshire, Scotland and first wife Isobel (Laird) Adam's children. He was only about eleven years old when he left Scotland, the same age as his nephew, John W. Grant, traveling with his family to the American lands. He worked a great deal alongside his brother, William, while the family was in Salt Lake City, Utah, and left with them in 1854 when he was fifteen. After his stepmother, Margaret, reconsidered and decided to stay with the Adam family, it was Aleck who went back to Fillmore City, Millard Co., Utah to fetch her. Eventually, Aleck settled in Monterey County, Ca. He traveled about quite a bit throughout his life, but Bryson Valley was his most permanent residence. During the years 1881-1888, he raised cows and made cheese. He then took this cheese, traveling weekly up to Moss Landing and sold it.

When Aleck married a woman named Esther Bradley sometime prior to 1877, he lived in Santa Maria, Santa Barbara Co., Ca. Two sons were born there, one of whom was William Alexander in 1877. William A. was also known as 'Fancy Bill' in reference to his dapper way of dressing. William A. never married and it was he who cared for his dad in his old age. He claimed that his father didn't want him to marry and blamed him for 'ruining his life'. Aleck's younger son was named Ronald McDonald Adam (in honor of his Scottish ancestors who were of the McDonald clan). Aleck and Esther separated while the boys were still living at home. William A. stayed with his father and Ronald went to live with his mother, who moved to Lompoc, Santa Barbara Co., Ca. Ronald married Malinda Jane Hardenbrook in Nov., 1905 and had three children, Kathryn, John Donald and Kenneth Laird. Ronald owned and published the Lompoc Record and was quite well known and respected in newspaper circles. When he got older, he gave the newspaper to his two sons. Donald sold out his share and moved to the Sacramento area and Kenneth remained in Lompoc while Kathryn settled in Palo Alto, Santa Clara Xo., Ca. - Chloe Perdew

 

Agnes Adam Russell Mounsey

Agnes Adam (Janet and Elizabeth's mother and William Thom Adam's sister) died of "bronchitis" on April 2, 1877 in Chapelhall, Bothwell, Scotland at the age of 84.

 

Robert Wilding Widdison

Robert Wilding Widdison (son of William Livingston Widdison and Mary Alice Wilding) was born on May 13, 1877, in Salt Lake City. - from Pioneer Memories: History of Hibbard Ward to 1904, BYU Harold B. Lee Library Digital Collections

 

U.S. Land Grant to Alexander Adam of Santa Barbara County,  July 2, 1877

U.S. Land Grant to Alexander Adam of Santa Barbara County,  July 2, 1877
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

San Bernardino

In 1877 John Henderson went to Santa Maria, to an uncle, W. L. Adam, who had purchased eleven leagues of land and who also conducted a large general store. He worked for a time in the store and then engaged in driving a team, as he did not like the indoor confinement. From History of San Bernardino and Riverside counties with selected biography of actors and witnesses of the period of growth and achievement. (Volume 2) - Brown, John

 

James Gourley Widdison (son of Thomas Widdison and Janet Russell) married Alice Pinney in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had twelve children: James Gourley (1879-1938); John Henry (1881-1955); Alice Amelia (1884-1944); Willard (1886-1934); Robert Eugene (1888-1940); Amy Seager (1891-1946); Lucinda (1893-1979); Thomas Richard (1895-1957); Gilbert Pinney (1898-????); Arvila (1900-1988); and Janet Elizabeth (1902-1985). - from Jones Family Tree on Ancestry.com

James Gourley Widdison & Lillian Gardner

 

John T. Adam (son of William Thom Adam and Margaret Thomson) married Mahalia Haun Sept 18, 1878, in Hollister, California. They had at least three children: William Zimry (born June 26, 1879); John Rufus (1882-1973); and Ruby Pearl (1890-1969). - from 1900 US Federal Census and Banes-Brown Family Tree on ancestry.com

William Zimry Adam & Rosetta Grace Doty | John Rufus Adam & Mary Inez Vickery

John Rufus Adam
John Rufus Adam
Photo courtesy Fullmer Family Tree on ancestry.com

 

1879 ..........

Jemima Adam Easton

Jemima Adam Easton (daughter of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) died June 12, 1879 in Gilroy, California, at the age of 48. She's buried in the Gavilan Hills Memorial Park and Catholic Cemetery (also known as the IOOF, Masonic Cemetery)in Gilroy, California. - Find A Grave and Chloe Perdew

 

John Henderson (son of James Easton and Margaret Adam Henderson) married Asenia Ferrel Wilson on Dec 1, 1879, in San Bernardino, California. They didn't have any children.

 

1880 ..........

"The deputies were treated courteously by Bro. Livingston in his hospitable Scotch manner,
joining with him in a social glass"

In the early 80s began the activities of the U. S. officers in the enforcement of the anti-polygamy laws, accompanied by the well remembered raids of the U. S. marshals in the arresting the men and women so involved. During these trying times it became necessary for many of the church authorities and leading brethren to remain in retirement or in hiding at all times, and the church quarry and vicinity often afforded a place of concealment for them. The home of James A. Muir at Wasatch was a resting place many times for those brethren who were brought there by Livingston for a night's repose. There was a bridge spanning Little Cottonwood creek from the boarding house to the south side where the summer sleeping quarters of the men were located. On the south side also was located the office of the superintendent of the quarry. Livingston seldom slept at night when any of the brethren were in the vicinity, particularly keeping watch at the bridge. No officer seemed inclined to make the effort to cross the bridge and it is said that he once forcibly ejected one who attempted it. Among the church leaders who were there from time to time were President John Taylor, President Woodruff, Joseph F. Smith, Wm. H. Preston and others. J. W. McHenry was the teamster for the President in those days with Richard James as assistant.

The following incident is reported to have taken place at the office building on the south side of the creek: President John Taylor and his counselor George Q. Cannon were in hiding at this time and their arrest was very much desired by the officials who were prosecuting the cases arising from plural marriage. These two men were on a certain day with Brother Livingston in the little two room office building before referred to. A horse and buggy appeared on the road leading to the boarding house situated on the north side of the creek. The buggy contained two deputy marshals who were as usual looking for the men in hiding. Brother Livingston recognized them, being well acquainted with them, and as they approached he invited them into the office to have a drink. In the meantime the two brethren mentioned just retired to the rear room. The deputies were treated courteously by Bro. Livingston in his hospitable Scotch manner, joining with him in a social glass. After a while they took their leave. The two men in the rear room whom the officers would have given a great deal to apprehend at that particular time, no doubt breathed a trifle easier owing to Livingston's quick initiative.

James C. Livingston once remarked that people say of me "That I know no fear; but I am afraid at times though when called upon to do things I will not shirk from my duty."

 - from information from James A. Muir compiled by William D. Kuhre, Sandy, Utah, Dec 12, 1935, in James Campbell Livingston

 

Janet Russell

Janet Russell Widdison
Janet Russell

1880 United States Federal Census - Great Salt Lake City
Janet Russell Widdison with her son Robert and his family
 

Name: Jennett Widdison
Home in 1880: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
Age: 68
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1812
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of Household: Mother
Father's birthplace: Scotland
Mother's birthplace: Scotland
Marital Status: Widowed
Race: White
Gender: Female
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert Widdison 38
Louisa Widdison 31
Louisa Widdison 9
Robert Widdison 8
Jennet Widdison 6
Lucy Widdison 3
Zina Widdison 4m
Jennett Widdison 68

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah; Roll: 1337; Family History Film: 1255337; Page: 114C; Enumeration District: 46; . Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

Lois Widdison

General Blacksmithing


Wednesday, May 12, 1880 Paper: Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT) Volume: XXIX Issue: 15 Page: 237

Robert Widdison's occupation was listed as "blacksmith". Robert's brother James was living next door with his family and he, too, was a "blacksmith".


The 1880 US Census for Salt Lake City, Utah

Lucy Widdison (age 3 in the above census) would later write A Sketch in the Life of the Thomas Widdison Family of Scotland and England.

1880 United States Federal Census - Great Salt Lake City
Janet Russell's daughter Agnes with her family

Name: Jas. C. Livingston
Age: 49
Birth Year: abt 1831
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Agnes Livingston
[Annie Livingston] 
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Supt Of Quarry
Household Members:
Name Age
Jas. C. Livingston 49
Agnes Livingston 47
Thomas Livingston 17
Robert Livingston 14
Charles Livingston 12
Agnes Livingston 16
Hannah Livingston 9
Annie Livingston 26
John Livingston 6

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah; Roll: 1337; Family History Film: 1255337; Page: 163A; Enumeration District: 050; Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

James C. Livingston Residence c 1880
Livingston Family Residence in Birch Creek, near Fountain Green, Utah c. 1887

House built in Birch Creek, Sanpete, Utah, by James Campbell Livingston Sr. about 1887. The house was was referred to as the finest in the valley and very elegantly furnished. Peacocks roamed about the yard, beautiful flowers bloomed and were well cared for. There was a pond on the property, used to store water for irrigating the crops, garden, shrubs, and trees. Ducks made the pond their home, as did polliwogs, frogs, and salamanders. In the winter, blocks of ice were cut from this pond and stored in a small ice house. The ice would last well into the summer. James is seated on the porch at the right, with his left arm on the rail. His right arm having been blown off by an accidental dynamite explosion while cutting granite at the stone quarry in Little Cottonwood Canyon to be used in the building of the Salt Lake Temple. - Dennis Davis

Unidentified
Louisa and Jennet Widdison? (middle)

Agnes Widdison and James Campbell Livingston c. 1880
Agnes Widdison and James C. Livingston (with grandchildren Zina and Lucy?)

Archibald George Livingston c 1880
Archibald George Livingston c. 1880

Sometime between 1877 and 1879 Andrew Wardrobe moved from Carson City, Nevada to Nez Perce (County), Idaho. His daughter Elizabeth was born in Nevada and Ellen in Idaho (from census record).

1880 United States Federal Census - Nez Perce, Idaho
Elizabeth Russell's son Andrew Wardrobe and his family
Robert Gray (Andrew's step-brother) lived next door

Name: Andrew M. Wardrobe
Home in 1880: Nez Perce, Idaho
Age: 39
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1841
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of Household: Self (Head)
Spouse's Name: Isabelle Wardrobe
Father's birthplace: Scotland
Mother's birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Farmer
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Household Members:
Name Age
Andrew M. Wardrobe 39
Isabelle Wardrobe 23
Robert Wardrobe 4
Elizabeth Wardrobe 3
Ellen Wardrobe 1

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place:  , Nez Perce, Idaho; Roll: 173; Family History Film: 1254173; Page: 243C; Enumeration District: 23; Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

Andrew M. Wardrobe, Farmer
Andrew M. Wardrobe, Farmer, and Robert Gray, Farmer
See
original document

On May 14, 1888, Nez Perce County became Latah County.

1880 United States Federal Census - Clear Creek, Cassia, Idaho
Isabella Powers (daughter of Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe and John Gray) and her family

Name: Isabella Powers
Age: 33
Birth Year: abt 1847
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1880: Clear Creek, Cassia, Idaho
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: K. C. Powers
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Keeping House
Household Members:
Name Age
K. C. Powers 35
Isabella Powers 33
Charles H. Powers 8
William Powers 6
Isaac Powers 4
Maud Powers 1
John Gray 45
John Wade 26
Hyrum Mc Kinney 29

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Clear Creek, Cassia, Idaho; Roll: 173; Family History Film: 1254173; Page: 156B; Enumeration District: 013; . Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

Isabella's husband's name should be Henry C. Powers.

County officers declared  elected as County and Precinct officers as of June 9 1879  were... Henry Powers

Cassia County was created in 1879 from the parent County of   Owyhee and a Temporary County seat was approved 20 Feb 1879. On April 7 1879  Marsh Basin was appointed  as temporary County seat. The County was divided into seven precincts: Cassia Creek, Clear Creek, Goose Creek, Marsh Basin, Oakley, Rock Creek and Sublett. On April 14 1879 two more precincts were formed, Salmon Falls and Bonanza Bar. The county seat was Albion until 13 Jan 1919 when it was moved to Burley. There were many mixed feelings towards the County seat being moved. County officers declared  elected as County and Precinct officers as of June 9 1879  were: Probate Judge James H. Chase; Sheriff J.E. Harrington; Auditor and Recorder S.P. Weatherman; Treasurer M.G. Robison; Assessor T.M. Gray; County Commissioners C.M. Gray, R.A. Beecher and Sidney Kelly; Coroner J.D Burch; Surveyor Frank Riblett. Precinct  Justice of Peace were; Salmon Falls, M. O'Conner; Rock Creek, A.D. Norton and Lars Larson; Oakley, James Chaplow; Goose Creek, J.E. Miller and W.D. Robbins; Sublett, J. Galliger and Henry Powers; Bonanza Bar, Tho. Henry; Clear Creek, H.A. Baker; Marsh Basin, Josiah Bridger and R.N. Howell. Cassia County consists of the communities of Albion, Almo, Burley, Declo, Elba, Malta, Oakley and Sublett. - Christine Storey

 

The Easton Family in Oregon

1880 United States Federal Census - Wasco, Oregon
Agnes Adam (daughter of William Thom Adam & Isobel Laird) & James Easton

Name: L. James Easton
Age: 57
Birth Year: abt 1823
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: Fifteen-Mile, Wasco, Oregon
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: A. Agnes Easton
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Farmer
Household Members:
Name Age
L. James Easton 57
A. Agnes Easton 58
A. Charles Easton 22
F. John Easton 19

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Fifteen-Mile, Wasco, Oregon; Roll: 1084; Family History Film: 1255084; Page: 281A; Enumeration District: 123; Image: 0555. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

 

1880 United States Federal Census - Santa Barbara, California
William Thom Adam's son William Laird Adam and his family

Name: William Adam
Age: 48
Birth Year: abt 1832
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Elizabeth Adam
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Stockkeeper & Farmer
Household Members:
Name Age
William Adam 48
Elizabeth Adam 39
William Adam 18
Mary Adam 17
Isabella Adam 16
James Adam 14
Charles Adam 12
Thomas Adam 9
Anastaria Adam 7
Kenneth Adam 6
Catherine Adam 3
John M. Waugh 64

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Guadalupe, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: 81; Family History Film: 1254081; Page: 569D; Enumeration District: 086; Image: 0203. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

Elizabeth Adam was born in Canada. John M. Waugh is a carpenter born in Nova Scotia.

William Laird Adam
William Laird Adam
Photo courtesy Chloe Perdew, Findagrave

William L. Adam, a pioneer of 1854...

Prominent tax-payers in Santa Barbara County, 1880
Prominent tax-payers in Santa Barbara County, 1880
From a History of Santa Barbara county, California, with illustrations and biographical sketches of its prominent men and pioneers (1883)

Ranch, Residence and Store of William L. Adam, Santa Maria, Santa Barbara County, Cal.
Ranch, Residence and Store of William L. Adam, Santa Maria, Santa Barbara County, Cal.
From a History of Santa Barbara county, California, with illustrations and biographical sketches of its prominent men and pioneers (1883)

History of Santa Barbara County, California by Jesse D. Mason, 1883 (77 MB pdf)

 

William Laird Adam family photo

William Laird Adam family photo, taken in 1888

William Laird Adam family photo, taken in 1888, which shows William Laird Adam and wife Elizabeth 'Bessie' (Connor) Adam and 11 of their 15 children. Top Row, left. to right: Kenneth, James, Anastacia ('Ness'), William Connor, Mary and Charles. Bottom Row: Isabelle, Elizabeth Connor Adam, Carlton, Annie (baby), William Laird Adam, Katherine and Tom. - Photo courtesy Chloe Perdew

1880 United States Federal Census - Santa Maria, Santa Barbara, California
John Grant (son of Robert Grant and Isabelle Adam) and Margaret Nish
 

Name: John W. Grant
Age: 40
Birth Year: abt 1840
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: Santa Maria, Santa Barbara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Margaret Grant
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Stock Raiser
Household Members:
Name Age
John W. Grant 40
Margaret Grant 26
Isabelle Grant 11
Robert Grant 7
John Grant 4
Richard Grant 2

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Santa Maria, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: 81; Family History Film: 1254081; Page: 571D; Enumeration District: 086; Image: 0207. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

1880 United States Federal Census - San Bernardino, California
Margaret Adam Henderson and her grandson
 

Name: Margaret Henderson
Age: 63
Birth Year: abt 1817
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Widowed
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Conducting Farm
Household Members:
Name Age
Margaret Henderson 63
Alex Henderson 14

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California; Roll: 72; Family History Film: 1254072; Page: 486B; Enumeration District: 063; Image: 0195. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

Margaret Ada (Adam) Henderson and 7 of her 10 children.

Margaret Ada (Adam) Henderson and 7 of her 10 children.
Seated from left to right:
Margaret Victoria (Henderson) Mogeau Yager; Margaret Ada (Adam) Henderson; eldest son, William McDonald Henderson; eldest daughter Isabella (Henderson) Nish. Back Row: youngest daughter Mary Adam (Henderson) Levick Ashcroft; youngest son John Alexander Henderson (son of James Easton, who later took the name Henderson and was Mayor of San Bernardino 1919-21); Jeannette Adam (Henderson) Walkinshaw Roberts; and David Glenn Henderson. - Chloe Perdew

1880 United States Federal Census - San Bernardino, California
Isabella Henderson Nish and family

Name: Isabella Nish
Age: 43
Birth Year: abt 1837
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Widowed
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Conducting Farm
Household Members:
Name Age
Isabella Nish 43
Elisabeth U. Nish 22
Robert G. Nish 18
Isabella Nish 16
James E. Nish 13
John H. Nish 11
Fredrick Nish 9

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: San Bernardino, San Bernardino, California; Roll: 72; Family History Film: 1254072; Page: 486B; Enumeration District: 063; Image: 0195. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

Isabella Nish (43), Elizabeth (22), Robert (18), Isabella (16), James (13), John (11), Fredrick (9)
Isabella Nish (43), Elizabeth (22), Robert (18), Isabella (16), James (13), John (11), Fredrick (9)
Margaret Henderson (63) and Alex Henderson (14, grandson)
See original document

1880 United States Federal Census - Bishops Creek, Inyo, California
John (Easton) Henderson

Name: John Henderson
Age: 24
Birth Year: abt 1856
Birthplace: California
Home in 1880: Bishops Creek, Inyo, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Single
Occupation: Works On Farm
Household Members:
Name Age
Elisha Mallory 53
Mary Mallory 47
Mary Mallory 29
Katie Mallory 19
Eugene Mallory 15
Flora Mallory 14
Wallace Mallory 10
Sarah Brown 28
John Henderson 24
Amos Bemis 22

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Bishops Creek, Inyo, California; Roll: 66; Family History Film: 1254066; Page: 515B; Enumeration District: 015; Image: 0333. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

When the party reached Bishop Creek, Mr. Henderson decided to get a job there...
When the party reached Bishop Creek, Mr. Henderson decided to get a job there...
From History of San Bernardino and Riverside counties with selected biography of actors and witnesses of the period of growth and achievement. (Volume 2) - Brown, John

William McDonald Henderson of Rialto was the son of David Henderson and Margaret (not Isabel) Adam...


From Ingersoll's century annals of San Bernadino County, 1769-1904 (53 MB pdf)

Ingersoll's century annals of San Bernadino County, 1769-1904, by Luther A. Ingersoll, 1904 (53 MB pdf)

1880 United States Federal Census - Santa Barbara, California
Alexander Adam (son of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) & Esther Bradley
 

Name: Alexander Adam
Age: 39
Birth Year: abt 1841
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: Santa Maria, Santa Barbara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Esther Adam
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Farmer
Household Members:
Name Age
Alexander Adam 39
Esther Adam 17
William Adam 2

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Santa Maria, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: 81; Family History Film: 1254081; Page: 571D; Enumeration District: 086; Image: 0207. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

1880 United States Federal Census - Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
George Easton (widower of Jemima Adam) and family

Name: George Easton
Age: 51
Birth Year: abt 1829
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1880: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Widower
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Occupation: Farmer
Household Members:
Name Age
George Easton 51
Robert Easton 27
William Easton 25
Belle Easton 23
Elizabeth Easton 20
Emeline Easton 18
George Easton 16
Charles Easton 14
Alx. Easton 12

Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California; Roll: 82; Family History Film: 1254082; Page: 411C; Enumeration District: 258; Image: 0248. Source Information: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. 1880 U.S. Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the limited use license and other terms and conditions applicable to this site. Original data: Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Description: This database is an index to 50 million individuals enumerated in the 1880 United States Federal Census. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, occupation, relationship to the head of household, race, sex, age at last birthday, marital status, place of birth, parents’ place of birth. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1880 Federal Census.

 

1881 ..........

William McDonald Henderson (son of David Henderson and Margaret Adam) married Mary W. Winn on Dec 18, 1881, in San Bernardino, California. - from Caridid/Grant/Fancher family tree on ancestry.com

 

1882 ..........

Louise Widdison

Died - Louise Widdison, Sept 4, 1882
Died - Louise Widdison, Sept 4, 1882
The Salt Lake Herlad, 6 Sept 1882, page 1
Newspapers.com

 

Robert Russell Gray (son of Elizabeth Russell and John Gray) married Eliza Frances Follett in 1882. They had at least eleven children: Robert R; John William (born Dec 24,1883); Elva Belle (born Sept 12, 1885); Robert Andrew (born March 30, 1888); Elbert Eldred (born Dec 26, 1890); Lester E. (born Jan 7, 1892); Charles Chester (born May 26, 1894); Mary "Minnie" (born Sept 30, 1897);  Lucille Violet (born about 1902); Cecil Elmer (born March 8, 1903); and Jess F (born Sept 12, 1905).

Elva Belle Gray & Harrison S. Groat | Robert Andrew Gray & Sophia Mickelson | Charles Chester Gray & Mary Claire Navin
Mary "Minnie" Gray & Raymond Edwin Edwards

 

1884 ..........

San Bernardino

Virgil Earp
Virgil Earp

The California Voter Registers for 1884 lists Virgil Earp (Wyatt Earp's brother) as living in San Bernardino. Read more about Wyatt Earp in San Bernardino and Virgil Earp. Please note that Colton is only a few miles from San Bernardino.

Map of San Bernardino, 1881
Map of San Bernardino, 1881

After receiving his injuries in Tombstone, Virgil spent the next two years recovering from his injuries, primarily at his parent's home in Colton, California. He sought treatment for his wounds in San Francisco and was interviewed on the Southern Pacific train by a reporter whose story was printed in the San Francisco Examiner on May 27, 1882. The reporter described Virgil's appearance:

“His face, voice and manner were prepossessing. He is close to six feet in height, of medium build, chestnut hair, sandy mustache, light eyebrows, quiet, blue eyes and frank expression. He wore a wide-brimmed, slate-colored slouch hat, pants of a brown and white stripe, and a blue diagonal coat and vest, both the latter with bullet holes in them, bearing testimony of a recent fight when he was shot in the back, the bullet coming out of the front of his vest. His left arm was carried in a sling, also a memento of his last fight, when he received a bullet in his arm, since causing the loss of about six inches of bone which crippled him for life. The wounded arm is the cause of his visit to this city, where he seeks surgical aid in hope of so far recovering its use that he may be able to dress himself unaided.”

Despite the use of only one arm, Virgil was hired by the Southern Pacific Railroad to guard its tracks in Colton's famous "battle of the crossing". Virgil joined in the frog war as the Southern Pacific attempted to stop the California Southern Railroad, a subsidiary of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, from installing a crossing over the Southern Pacific tracks in Colton to gain access to California. Governor Waterman deputized a posse from San Bernardino, California and came down in person to enforce construction of the crossing, ending the Southern Pacific's railroad monopoly in Southern California.

In 1884 Virgil's father, Nicholas Porter Earp was elected justice of the peace. Two years later, Virgil Earp opened a private detective agency, which by all accounts was abandoned in 1886, when he was elected village constable in July.

When Colton was incorporated as a city, Virgil was elected as Colton's first City Marshal on July 11, 1887. He was paid $75 a month and was re-elected to another term in 1888. Among other duties, he was reported to have cleared blocked sewers and kept track of the electric light bulbs. Virgil and Allie's Colton home still stands at 528 West "H" Street.

In 1888 Virgil resigned as city marshal and he and Allie left Colton for San Bernardino. Five years later, in 1893, he and his wife moved to the short-lived mining town Vanderbilt, California. According to his wife, he owned and operated the only two story building in town, Earp Hall, a saloon and meeting hall used for public gatherings and even the town's church services. His business success in Vanderbilt did not match his success in politics, and he lost the election for town constable in 1894.

- from Virgil Earp, Wikipedia

It's interesting to note that Virgil Earp worked for the Southern Pacific Railroad. John Henderson worked as a "special officer" for the Santa Fe Railroad. Both men also became police officers: Virgil in Colton in 1887 and John Henderson in San Bernardino in 1889. Virgil moved to San Bernardino in 1888. It is probable that these men knew each other.

 

Orangeville, Utah

Jane Easton (daughter of Elizabeth Laird Easton) c 1884
Jane Easton (daughter of Robert & Elizabeth Laird Easton) c 1884

 

1886 ..........

Deputie's Doings in Beaver County
Robert Easton is the son of Robert Easton & Elizabeth Laird



Wednesday, March 10, 1886 Paper: Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT) Volume: XXXV Issue: 8 Page: 120

Robert Easton arrested on the charge of unlawful cohabitation with his wives

Robert Easton arrested on the charge of unlawful cohabitation with his wives
Wednesday, March 31, 1886 Paper: Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT) Volume: XXXV Issue: 11 Page: 161

 

"A meeting in John Gray's house..."

A Few Items in the History of the Morrisites by James A. Dove, c. 1890
A Few Items in the History of the Morrisites by James A. Dove, c. 1890

Nov. 25. — Spent the day well; baptized five in the Warm Springs, and set them in order at Sister Ellen's house. The sister prepared for us a good meal, and the same afternoon George bid the Saints farewell and started for San Francisco. I felt somewhat lonely now. On Sunday, the 29th, held a meeting in John Gray's house, and on several following Sundays in other houses in the first and second wards. Held meetings in the ninth ward for over a year, preaching in all over seventy times; baptized five in the River Jordan in July, 1886. In December George returned, and we preached at all times when an opportunity offered. In February, 1887, George went to Soda Springs, and preached there several times. He came down to Weber and rented some land, and James went up, and in May we re-interred Sister Bowman, who had been shot by Burton twenty years before. There were many Morrisites present — George Dove, James Dove, James Bowman and John Bowman speaking at the grave. We had the Court-house in Ogden City two months to preach in, and then George came home, James following in November, 1889. - from A Few Items in the History of the Morrisites by James A. Dove, c. 1890

 

U.S. Land Grant to Andrew M. Wardrobe at Lewiston, Idaho Territory, June 9, 1886

U.S. Land Grant to Andrew M. Wardrobe at Lewiston, Idaho Territory, June 9, 1886
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

U.S. Land Grant to Robert R. Gray at Lewiston, Idaho Territory, June 9, 1886

U.S. Land Grant to Robert R. Gray at Lewiston, Idaho Territory, June 9, 1886
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1887 ..........

Robert Easton

Robert Easton died in Greenville, Beaver County, Utah on May 25, 1887, after a protracted attack of asthma. He suffered greatly the last six weeks of his life. He was a native of Scotland and was born on the 27th of July, 1822. He embraced the Gospel in his youth. In the year of 1850, he arrived in Salt Lake City and the following year went with others to build up the Southern settlements. He settled in Cedar City where he labored hard with others to establish the Iron Works. During this time he met with a serious accident, breaking his back, from which he lay helpless for many months, suffering greatly. He moved from Cedar City to what was then called lower Beaver, having taken up some land four miles west of Beaver. He and others located there and founded the town of Greenville. In 1872, he was chosen and set apart by the Stake Presidency, as the Bishop of the Greenville Ward, which position he held for many years. In 1873 he performed a mission to his native land but on account of ill health, was obliged to return home the following year. In 1886, Brother Easton was arrested under the Edmund's law. He pleaded not guilty and stood trial. Strange to say the jury acquitted him. He was a staunch defender of the principles of the Gospel. Full of integrity and faith. He leaves two wives and 7 children, 3 sons and 4 daughters, to mourn his loss, with many grandchildren, friends and acquaintances. - from Robert Easton: Life Story

Robert Easton Memorial, Greenville, Beaver County, Utah
Robert Easton Memorial, Greenville, Beaver County, Utah

 

U.S. Land Grant to James C. Livingston, Jr. at Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, June 17, 1887

U.S. Land Grant to James C. Livingston, Jr. at Salt Lake City, Utah Territory, June 17, 1887
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1888 ..........

William Conner Adam & Ada Kelley

William Connor Adam
William Connor Adam
Photo courtesy of Chloe Perdew

William Connor Adam (son of William Laird Adam and Elizabeth Connor) married Ada Vere Kelley (daughter of Joseph Kelley and Catherine B. Langan) on Jan 10, 1888, in Guadalupe, San Luis Obispo County, California. They had at least four children: Irma C. Adam (born Nov 4, 1888 - Jan 26, 1983); Phyllis E. Adam (born May 18, 1891 - April 17, 1975); Elmo Charles Adam (born Jan 1, 1893 - March 18, 1943); and Leonald Henry Adam (born April 15, 1895 - July 13, 1976) - from Rootsweb

Phyllis Adam & Benton Franklin Marshall | Elmo Charles Adam & Barbara ?

 

Pajaro, California


James Adam and his mother Margaret Thompson Adam with William Zimry Adam in background, c 1888
Photo courtesy Chloe Perdew from James A. Adam - Find A Grave
 

John Henderson Elected Marshall

John Henderson was elected Marshal of San Bernardino in 1889. This started Henderson's journey to the mayor's seat. Henderson was also elected ex oficio tax collector and held that office, as well as being city marshal, until 1901. But he lost his bid for re-election. So he worked in the Police Department for four years and as a special officer with the Santa Fe Railway for seven years. The same year he was elected city marshal, he married Asenia Ferrel Wilson. But he had to resign from the railroad job when she became ill. Henderson, though, couldn't stay away from political office. He was later elected councilman from the 5th Ward and mayor in 1919. He served for two years.  - from John Alexander Henderson - Find A Grave

 

Janet Russell

Janet Russell (widow of Thomas Widdison and daughter of Robert Russell & Agnes Adam) died on Nov 14, 1889, in Hooper, Weber County, Utah, U.S.A., at the age of 77, and is buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. - from A Sketch in the Life of the Thomas Widdison Family of Scotland and England See also Find A Grave for Janet Russell Widdison

 

Faith in Every Footstep, Pioneers, 1847-1997
Faith in Every Footstep, Pioneers, 1847-1997

 

Thomas Widdison and Janet Russell Memorial
Thomas Widdison and Janet Russell Memorial
Photo Courtesy of Cheryl Sillitoe, great, great, great granddaughter of Janet Russell

 

1889 ..........

U.S. Land Grant to William Laird Adam of Santa Barbara County,  Dec 12, 1889

U.S. Land Grant to William Laird Adam of Santa Barbara County,  Dec 12, 1889
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1890 ..........

Robert Easton & Mary Florence Hoey

Robert Easton (son of Jemima Adam and George Easton) married Mary Florence Hoey sometime around 1890. They had at least three children: Jemima "Ebeth" (born about 1890); Horace (born about 1893); and Helen Lucille (1896-1993).

Horace Robert Easton & Lida Hyatt | Helen Lucille Easton & Alton Titus Emery

See Horace Robert Easton - Find A Grave | See Family Group Sheet for Helen Lucille Easton

 

Isabella Henderson Nish

Isabella Henderson Nish (daughter of Margaret Adam and David Henderson) on Sept 4, 1890, in San Bernardino, California, at the age of 55. - Chloe Perdew

Isabella Nish born Mar. 10, 1835 died Sept 4, 1890
Isabella Nish born Mar. 10, 1835 died Sept 4, 1890

 

1892 ..........

Salt Lake City

Laying the Capstone of the Great Temple at Salt Lake City, April 6th, 1892
Laying the Capstone of the Great Temple at Salt Lake City, April 6th, 1892

 

California

William Laird Adam, Santa Maria, California

William Laird Adam, Santa Maria, California, 1892
Place of Residence - Santa Maria
From The Greater Register, Santa Barbara County, California, 1892

 

James E. Adam & Mary Aloysius Donovan

James E. Adam
James E. Adam
Photo courtesy Ivan Moad family tree on ancestry.com

James Eugene Adam (son of William Laird Adam and Elizabeth O'Conner) married Mary Alosius Donovan in 1892. They had at least six children: William Patrick (born 1893); Elizabeth Mary (1894-1961); John Francis (1898-1973); Dorothy (born 1896); Kenneth A. (born 1901); and Janet B. (born 1905). - from Glenda Waugh & Ivan Moad family tree on ancestry.com

William Patrick Adam & Pauline Nevada Martin | Elizabeth M. Adam & William T. Shipsey | Dorothy M. Adam & Albert E. Ford
John Francis Adam & Hester Florence Myers | Kenneth A. Adam & Mary Adelle Johnston

 

U.S. Land Grant to James E. Adam of Santa Barbara County, California, April 1, 1892

U.S. Land Grant to James E. Adam of Santa Barbara County, California, April 1, 1892
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

U.S. Land Grant to Charles A. Adam of Santa Barbara County, California, April 23, 1892

U.S. Land Grant to Charles A. Adam of Santa Barbara County, California, April 23, 1892
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

U.S. Land Grant to John T. Adam, May 11, 1892

U.S. Land Grant to John T. Adam, May 11, 1892
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

To encourage the growth of timber on the Western Prairies,
the claim of Robert R. Gray has been established, June 10, 1892


From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

1893 ..........

U.S. Land Grant to James E. Adam of San Luis Obispo County, California, Jan 21, 1893

U.S. Land Grant to James E. Adam of San Luis Obispo County, California, Jan 21, 1893
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1894 ..........

Salt Lake City

"Robert Widdison and his wife built a Victorian brick house on Pugsley Court"

Multiple-family housing began to appear in the district (Capitol Hill neighborhoods in Salt Lake City) in the early 1890s. According to one report, in April of 1888, there was a "scarcity of rentable houses and a great demand for them," particularly four-room cottages for small families. This housing shortage may also account for the number of boarders. Robert Widdison (1844-1921), blacksmith, and his wife, Lois Thompson (1849-1901), built a Victorian brick house on Pugsley Court in 1894. After his wife's death, Widdison converted the house to a duplex, and it has remained a two-family dwelling since. - US Department of the Interior, National Parks Service, National Register of Historic Places Registration Form

 

Agnes Adam Easton

Agnes Adam Easton died on May 2, 1894, in Dufur, Oregon.

Agnes Adam, Wife of James L. Easton, Born in Bothwell Parish, Lanarkshire Co. Scotland Sept 13, 1821, Died May 2, 1894
Agnes Adam, Wife of James L. Easton, Born in Bothwell Parish, Lanarkshire Co. Scotland Sept 13, 1821, Died May 2, 1894
James Easton disappeared sometime after this. His body may have been found in 1978.

2014 Photos of the Easton Family Plots in the Star #23 Rebekah Community Cemetery, Dufur, Oregon

 

U.S. Land Grant to Charles A. Adam of San Luis Obispo County, California, May 26, 1894

U.S. Land Grant to Charles A. Adam of San Luis Obispo County, California, May 26, 1894
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1895 ..........

Miss Nettie Widdison & Mr. Robert Gillespie united in marriage

Miss Nettie Widdison & Mr. Robert Gillespie united in marriage, Sept 15, 1895
Sept 15, 1895

 

1896 ..........

John Franklin Easton

John Franklin Easton (son of Agnes Adam and James Laird Easton) died on Feb 1, 1896, in Dufur, Wasco County, Oregon, at the age of 34 and is buried in the Star # 23 Rebekah Community Cemetery in Dufur, Oregon.

The Dalles daily chronicle. (The Dalles, Or.) 1890-1948, February 05, 1896, Image 1
The Dalles daily chronicle. (The Dalles, Or.) 1890-1948, February 05, 1896, Image 1

Erected By The Woodmen of the World
Erected By The Woodmen of the World

Peaceful Be Thy Silent Slumber

Card of Thanks from Elizabeth Feld on the death of her husband
Card of Thanks from Elizabeth Feld on the death of her husband
The Dalles daily chronicle. (The Dalles, Or.) 1890-1948, July 21, 1896, Image 3

2014 Photos of the Easton Family Plots in the Star #23 Rebekah Community Cemetery, Dufur, Oregon

 

Mt. Pleasant Public School

Trustees & Teachers of Mt. Pleasant Public School April 1896
Trustees & Teachers of Mt. Pleasant Public School April 1896
Front Row right: R.W. Livingston

 

John Gray

John Gray (husband of Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe) died in 1896 and is buried in the Sublett Cemetery, Cassia County, Idaho. Also buried in the Sublett Cemetery are Henry Clay Powers (Dec 8, 1844 - Jan 12, 1930), Isabell Gray Powers (Nov, 1847 - Nov 13, 1940), Andrew Robert Powers (Aug 16, 1892 - May 22, 1915) and Virginia Powers (Jan 28, 1916 - April 21, 1917).

John Gray 1822-1896
John Gray 1822-1896

 
1897 ..........

John A. Henderson Appointed on the Police Force

The weekly Sun (San Bernardino), 11 Sept 1897
The weekly Sun (San Bernardino), 11 Sept 1897
Newspapers.com

 

1898 ..........

U.S. Land Grant to William L. Adam for Santa Barbara County, California, June 27, 1898
"to encourage the growth of timber"

U.S. Land Grant to William L. Adam , June 27, 1898
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

U.S. Land Grant to James E. Adam of Santa Barbara County, California, Aug 15, 1898

U.S. Land Grant to James E. Adam of Santa Barbara County, California, Aug 15, 1893
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

The Spanish-American War

The "Olympia" at Manila
"Uss olympia manila" by Murat Halstead - Our Country in War by Murat Halstead (1898).

The Spanish–American War (Spanish: Guerra hispano-estadounidense) was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States, the result of U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. U.S. attacks on Spain's Pacific possessions led to involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately to the Philippine–American War. - Wikipedia

John Thomas Burke, Manila, Philippines c 1898
John Thomas Burke, Manila, Philippines c 1898

 

The Dalles, Oregon

The Dalles, directory of 1898 lists the following settlers at Nansene:

W.O. Adams, John Anderson, D., W.F. & Sherman Baker, Tim Brownhill, Melissa Broyles, Eban P. Butler, M. Butler, Omar Butler, Polk Butler, Roy Butler, W.H. Butler, J.A. Campbell, Fritz Clausen, C.E. Conkling, C. Cooper, E.L. Craft, C.H. & A.M. Crain, W.D. Cunningham, John Decker, J.L. Easton, John Elliott, Horatio Fargher, H. Gardner, C.A.S. Grazer, W.E. Gilhousen, C.H. & John Hadley, W.L. Harrington, A.W. Harris, Tom Harris, R. Harris, Wm. Hastings, Frank Hathaway, Bert, Joe and W.R. Haynes, A. Holt, M.W. Houser, A. Hyre, Elmer James, U.S. & O. Jones, F.G. Keller, James L. Kelley, Joe D. Kelley, F.F. Kirkham, Paulis, Edward and Albert Limmeroth, A.R. Logan, Dennis McCauley, J.W. McConnell, H. & J.H. McCoy, P.J. McGrail, Scott McKellar, J.W. Mae, A.F. Martin, J.C. Marven, H.E., H.P., James and Elvira Moore, J. Murray, Wm. H. Neabeck, Chas. Nicholson, Antone Newtrey, Lewis Omeg, Hayden O'Neal, Joe & Tom Ramus, Alex Rees, Peter Reesch, George Rice, Albert S. Roberts, Bell Robertson, G.W. Robertson, Peter Stroller, Chas Swain, Henry Thomas, Alfred Trudell, Martin Wahmann, F.M. Warner, Martin Waterman, Richard Westgard, George Willard, D.C. Wilson, Ed Wilson, J.J. Woolery, W.T. Wright, A.C. Younkin. - From Wasco County History

 

Charles Alexander Easton

Charles Alexander Easton died on March 23, 1898, in Dufur, Wasco County, Oregon at the age of 39. - from Find A Grave

Charles A. Easton Dec 25, 1858 - Mar 23, 1898
Charles A. Easton Dec 25, 1858 - Mar 23, 1898

2014 Photos of the Easton Family Plots in the Star #23 Rebekah Community Cemetery, Dufur, Oregon

 

Elizabeth Connor Adam

Elizabeth Connor Adam (wife of William Laird Adam) died on May 21, 1898, in Santa Barbara County, California, and is buried in the Santa Maria Cemetery. - from Find A Grave

 

Charles A. Adam & Mary Jane Porter

Charles A. Adam (son of William Laird Adam and Elizabeth O'Conner) married Mary Jane Porter (daughter of Arza Porter and Maria Rosa Sparks) in 1898. Their marriage ended in divorce with no children.

Isaac Sparks and the Rancho Huasna

 

1899 ..........

John Henderson Named Marshal

John Henderson Named Marshal
The San Bernardino County Sun, 26 Feb 1899, page 4
Newspapers.com

 

Anastasia Adam & Isaac J. Porter

Anasatia Adam (daughter of William Laird Adam and Elizabeth O'Conner) and Isaac James Porter (son of Azra Porter and Maria Rosa Sparks) were married on Oct 25, 1899, in Santa Maria, California. They had at least three children: Elizabeth Ann (born Aug 15, 1900); Rosa Anastasia (born Dec 16, 1901); and William Arza (Oct 18, 1908). - from The Descendants of William Laird Adam and Descendants of Maria Rosa Sparks Porter

Elizabeth Ann Porter & Donald Marion Prentice | William Arza Porter & Josephine Poncetta

Children of Elizabeth Ann Porter & Donald Marion Prentice

Mary Katherine (Wolf) and John Anthony
From The Descendants of William Laird Adam

Children of William Azra Porter & Josephine Poncetta

Anastasia (Emslie), Isaac Joseph, Rosemary (Doud) and Charles Robert
From The Descendants of William Laird Adam

 

William Zimry Adam & Rosetta Grace Doty

William Zimry Adam (son of John Adam and Mahalia Haun and grandson of William Thom Adam and Margaret Thomson) married Rosetta "Rosie" Doty on Dec 25, 1899. They had two children: Velma (born 1901) and Donald (born 1904). - from Chloe Perdew on Findagrave for William Zimry "Buckskin Bill" Adam

Velma Adam & Clyde Dayton

Velma, Rosie, William and Donald Adam c. 1905
Velma, Rosie, William and Donald Adam c. 1905
Photo courtesy Chloe Perdew

"He was well known for his sense of fairness and commitment to justice"

For many years, Bill served as a Justice of the Peace. He was well known for his sense of fairness and commitment to justice. He is remembered as having said that 'he didn't care whose toes he stepped on - he would do the right thing'. One sampling of this sort of innovative sentencing was when a man had to clean up a whole block for punishment. His sense of fairness and integrity made him very well thought of... One great tragedy occurred in 1916 when Bill and Rosie's son, Donald, died at age twelve. He had been sickly for some time, but still his loss was keenly felt. Twelve years later, Rosetta died of cancer and Bill eventually, in 1942, married a distant cousin who was also widowed, Ebeth Easton White. This marriage was very successful in many ways. Both Bill and Ebeth loved music. He played the violin and she played the piano. Ebeth once again was able to live in the country and often went horseback riding with Bill's daughter, Velma. In the early 60's, when Bill was in his early 80's, his home burned down, destroying a lifetime's collection of objects and family papers. Of irreplaceable value was a book he was writing about his family. - from Chloe Perdew on Findagrave for William Zimry "Buckskin Bill" Adam

 

1900 ..........

1900 United States Federal Census - Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah
Agnes Widdison (daughter of Janet Russell and Thomas Widdison) & James Campbell Livingston

Name: Agnes Livingston
Age: 68
Birth Date: Dec 1831
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1900: Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah
[Fountain Green, Utah] 
Race: White
Gender: Female
Immigration Year: 1853
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: James C Livingston
Marriage Year: 1854
Years Married: 46
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother: number of living children: 0
Mother: How many children: 0
Household Members:
Name Age
James C Livingston 66
Agnes Livingston 68

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah; Roll: T623_1686; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 123. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

1900 United States Federal Census - Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah
James Campbell Livingston, Jr. and his family

Name: James Livingston Jr.
Age: 43
Birth Date: Feb 1857
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1900: Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Phebe Livingston
Marriage Year: 1875
Years Married: 25
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
James Livingston 43
Phebe Livingston 43
Arthur Livingston 17
Claud Livingston 13
Ray Livingston 13
Iva Livingston 8
Mable Livingston 2

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah; Roll: T623_1686; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 123. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

"I have always loved and honored my parents and have lived in happy homes with them. I have made mistakes many of them for which I cannot blame my parents, their teachings and advise to their children have always been the best. My mother had a quicker temper than my father, she would some time use the rod, not so with father, a word from him was sufficient. My mother had brown eyes and dark hair. My father had blue eyes and dark hair. My father average weight as I remember him was about 150 to 160 lbs. - height about 5'7" or 8". He was a good black smith and repaired his own machinery and tools on the farm and always did his work well. He was naturally religious and I never remember when he did not have a firm testimony of the gospel and the divinity of the Prophet Joseph Smith's mission and his advise was always to obey the authority of the priesthood and leaders of the church. He enjoyed a good joke and always tried to look upon the bright side of life. He was an interpretation of Bing Crosby's definition of personality "When I met him I was looking down but when I left him I was looking up." I never expect to be a better man than was he and I shall be satisfied if I can live as well and as good a life as he lived. He died at the age of 67 years and appreciated his family and many many friends. He was born on St. Valentine's day Feb 14, 1858.  I have heard him sing "Flow Gently Sweet Afton" and "You'll never miss the Water till the Well runs dry" and others. I think his favorite song was "The cricket on the hearth" which he often had his two oldest daughters Phebe and Minnie sing after he had his evening meal and waiting for bed time. Jesse resembles father in looks a great deal from pictures I have seen of father when he was Jesse's age." - Arthur Livingston, Aug 11, 1963, from Livingstonfamily.org

Robert Widdison Livingston
Robert Widdison Livingston

1900 United States Federal Census - Ward 4, Salt Lake City, Utah
Robert Widdison Livingston and family
 
Name: Robert W Livingston
Age: 34
Birth Date: Jun 1865
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1900: Salt Lake City Ward 4, Salt Lake, Utah
[Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah] 
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Hettie Livingston
Marriage Year: 1888
Years Married: 12
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert W Livingston 34
Hettie Livingston 30
Leo M Livingston 11
Blanche Livingston 7

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Salt Lake City Ward 4, Salt Lake, Utah; Roll: T623_1684; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 40. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

Robert's occupation is "Insurance Agent".
 

1900 United States Federal Census - Ward 3, Salt Lake City, Utah
Janet Russell's son Robert and his family

Name: Robert Widdison
Age: 56
Birth Date: Mar 1844
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1900: Salt Lake City Ward 3, Salt Lake, Utah
[Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah] 
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1853
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Lois Widdison
Marriage Year: 1870
Years Married: 30
Father's Birthplace: England
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert Widdison 56
Lois Widdison 51
Lucy Widdison 22
Gina Widdison 20
Laura Widdison 16
Bessie Widdison 15
Walter Widdison 13

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Salt Lake City Ward 3, Salt Lake, Utah; Roll: T623_1684; Page: 8B; Enumeration District: 35. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule Census.

 

1900 United States Federal Census - Salem, Freemont, Idaho
Janet Russell's son William and his family

Name: Wm L Widdison
Age: 53
Birth Date: Sep 1846
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1900: Salem, Fremont, Idaho
[St. Anthony, Fremont, Idaho] 
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1853
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mary A Widdison
Marriage Year: 1875
Years Married: 25
Father's Birthplace: England
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Wm L Widdison 53
Mary A Widdison 45
Elizabeth J Widdison 21
Rose Widdison 13
Rachel Widdison 10
Ella L Widdison 8
Irvin Wm Widdison 4/12

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Salem, Fremont, Idaho; Roll: T623_233; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 56. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

 

1900 United States Federal Census - Hooper, Weber, Utah
Janet Russell's son James with his family

Name: James G Widdison
Age: 47
Birth Date: Jan 1853
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1900: Hooper, Weber, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1853
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Alice Widdison
Marriage Year: 1879
Years Married: 21
Father's Birthplace: England
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
James G Widdison 47
Alice Widdison 40
James G Widdison 20
John H Widdison 18
Alice A Widdison 16
Willard Widdison 13
Robert E Widdison 11
Amy S Widdison 9
Lucinda Widdison 6
Thomas R Widdison 4
Gilbert P Widdison 2

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Hooper, Weber, Utah; Roll: T623_1688; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 181. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

 

1900 United States Federal Census - Geneese, Latah County, Idaho
Elizabeth Russell's son Andrew Mark Wardrobe and his family
 

Name: Andrew Wardrobe
Home in 1900: Genesee, Latah, Idaho
Age: 60
Birth Date: Aug 1839
Birthplace: Scotland
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1843
Relationship to head-of-house: Head
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Spouse's Name: Isabell Wardrobe
Marriage Year: 1875
Marital Status: Married
Years Married: 25
Household Members:
Name Age
Andrew Wardrobe 60
Isabell Wardrobe 44
Robert Wardrobe 24
Lizzie Wardrobe 22
Ella Wardrobe 19
Agnes Wardrobe 18
Marie Wardrobe 17
Effie Wardrobe 15
Willis Wardrobe 13
John Wardrobe 12
Andrew Wardrobe 12
Melvin Wardrobe 10
Jennie Wardrobe 7
Drew Wardrobe 3

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Genesee, Latah, Idaho;Roll: T623_233; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 73. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

Andrew Wardrobe's occupation is listed as "farmer".
Elizabeth Wardrobe married Archie Le Roy Tucker on Oct 7, 1903, in Latah County, Utah.

1900 United States Federal Census - Geneese, Latah County, Idaho
Robert R. Gray and his wife and family

Name: Robert R Gray
Age: 41
Birth Date: Jan 1852
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1900: Genesee, Latah, Idaho
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Eliza Gray
Marriage Year: 1882
Years Married: 18
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert R Gray 41
Eliza Gray 33
John W Gray 17
Alva B Gray 15
Robert Gray 12
Elbert Gray 10
Lester Gray 8
Charles Gray 6
Minnie Gray 2

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Genesee, Latah, Idaho; Roll: 233; Page: 19A; Enumeration District: 0073; FHL microfilm: 1240233. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census

1900 United States Federal Census - Sublett, Cassia, Idaho
Elizabeth Russell's daughter Isabella and her family

Name: Isabelle Powers
Age: 51
Birth Date: 1849
Birthplace: Nevada
Home in 1900: Sublett, Cassia, Idaho
[Yale, Cassia, Idaho] 
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Henry C Powers
Marriage Year: 1868
Years Married: 32
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother: number of living children: 10
Mother: How many children: 12
Household Members:
Name Age
Henry C Powers 56
Isabelle Powers 51
Maud Powers 20
Ida Powers 18
Margarette Powers 15
Isabelle Powers 14
Harrison Powers 12
Johnie Powers 9
Andrew Powers 7
Isacc Powers 23

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Sublett, Cassia, Idaho; Roll: T623_232; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 37. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

 

1900 United States Federal Census - Santa Barbara, California
William Thom Adam's son William Laird Adam and his family

Name: Wm L Adam
Age: 63
Birth Date: Aug 1836
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1900: Township 7, Santa Barbara, California
[Santa Barbara] 
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1850
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Widowed
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Wm L Adam 63
Mary Adam 37
Thomas A Adam 29
Kate Adam 22
Carlyle Adam 19
Annie Adam 14

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 7, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: 110; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 161; FHL microfilm: 1240110. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

1900 United States Federal Census - Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
George Easton (widower of Jemima Adam)

Name: George Easton Sr. 
Age: 71
Birth Date: Jan 1829
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1900: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1848
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Widowed
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
George Easten 71
Emeline Easten 38
Elizabeth Brock 40
Alex Easten 31

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Gilroy, Santa Clara, California; Roll: 110; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 0051; FHL microfilm: 1240110. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

George Easton died in 1903 and is buried in the Gavilan Hills Memorial Park and Catholic Cemetery, Gilroy, California

1900 United States Federal Census - Santa Barbara, California
William Laird Adam's son William Connor Adam & Ada Vere Kelley and their children

Name: Wm C Adam
Age: 37
Birth Date: Oct 1862
Birthplace: California
Home in 1900: Township 7, Santa Barbara, California
[Santa Barbara] 
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Ada V Adam
Marriage Year: 1887
Years Married: 13
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Canada Eng
Household Members:
Name Age
Wm C Adam 37
Ada V Adam 35
Irma C Adam 9
Phyllis E Adam 1
Elmo C Adam 7
Leonald H Adam 5

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Township 7, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: 110; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 161; FHL microfilm: 1240110. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

 

1900 United States Federal Census - San Antonio, Monterey, California
John Adam (son of William Thom Adam & Margaret Thomson) & Mahalia Haun

Name: John T Adam
Age: 46
Birth Date: Nov 1853
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1900: San Antonio, Monterey, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mohola J Adam
Marriage Year: 1878
Years Married: 22
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
John T Adam 46
Mohola J Adam 40
John R Adam 17
Ruby P Adam 10
Thomas A Meritt 10

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: San Antonio, Monterey, California; Roll: 94; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 0014; FHL microfilm: 1240094. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

 

1900 United States Federal Census - Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California
Charles A. Adam & Mary Jane Porter

Name: Charles A Adam
Age: 32
Birth Date: Dec 1867
Birthplace: California
Home in 1900: Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mary J Adam
Marriage Year: 1897
Years Married: 3
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Canada, England
Household Members:
Name Age
Charles A Adam 32
Mary J Adam 24
Rosa Porter 49
Rosa Porter 22
Della Maur  

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California; Roll: 109; Page: 22A; Enumeration District: 0022; FHL microfilm: 1240109. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

1900 US Census for Charles and Anastasia Adam
Isaac Porter (29), Anastacia (28), Arza (21), Asa (19)
Charles A. Adam (32), Mary J. (24), Rosa Porter (49) and Rosa (22)
See original document

1900 United States Federal Census - Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California
William Laird Adam's daughter Anastasia Adam and Isaac Porter and his brothers

Name: Isaac Porter
Age: 29
Birth Date: Mar 1871
Birthplace: California
Home in 1900: Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Anastacia Porter
Marriage Year: 1900
Years Married: 0
Father's Birthplace: New York
Mother's Birthplace: California
Household Members:
Name Age
Isaac Porter 29
Anastacia Porter 28
Arza Porter 21
Asa Porter 19

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo, California; Roll: 109; Page: 22A; Enumeration District: 0022; FHL microfilm: 1240109. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

1900 United States Federal Census - Cholame, San Luis Obispo, California
John Grant (son of Robert Grant and Isabelle Adam) and Margaret Nish

Name: Jack W Grant
[John Grant] 
Age: 61
Birth Date: Jul 1838
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1900: Cholame, San Luis Obispo, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1844
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Margret U Grant
Marriage Year: 1868
Years Married: 32
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Jack W Grant 61
Margret U Grant 47
Richard Grant 21
Viva A Grant 20
Adam L Grant 18
Fred W Grant 15
Jessie M Grant 13
Archie J Grant 9

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Cholame, San Luis Obispo, California; Roll: 109; Page: 12B; Enumeration District: 0024; FHL microfilm: 1240109. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census

 

1900 United States Federal Census - San Bernardino, California
John Alexander Henderson (son of James Easton and Margaret Adam Henderson) & Asenia Ferrel Wilson

Name: John A Henderson
Age: 42
Birth Date: May 1858
Birthplace: California
Home in 1900: San Bernardino Ward 5, San Bernardino, California
[San Bernardino] 
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Senia F Henderson
Marriage Year: 1890
Years Married: 10
Household Members:
Name Age
John A Henderson 42
Senia F Henderson 33

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: San Bernardino Ward 5, San Bernardino, California; Roll: 97; Page: 18A; Enumeration District: 228; FHL microfilm: 1240097. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

John Henderson's occupation is "City Police"

The Weekly Sun (San Bernardino), 6 April 1900
The Weekly Sun (San Bernardino), 6 April 1900
Newspapers.com

Margaret Adam Henderson died on Aug 2, 1900, in San Bernardino, California, at the age of 84.  - from Findagrave for Margaret Ada Adam Henderson

1900 United States Federal Census - Bradley, Monterey, California
Robert Easton (son of Jemima Adam and George Easton) & Mary Hoey and family
 

Name: Robert Easton
Age: 46
Birth Date: Mar 1854
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1900: Bradley, Monterey, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mary Easton
Marriage Year: 1889
Years Married: 11
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert Easton 46
Mary Easton 31
Jemima Easton 10
Horace Easton 6
Helen Easton 4
William Hoey 20

Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Bradley, Monterey, California; Roll: 94; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0003; FHL microfilm: 1240094. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls. Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. Census takers recorded many details including each person's name, address, relationship to the head of household, color or race, sex, month and year of birth, age at last birthday, marital status, number of years married, the total number of children born of the mother, the number of those children living, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States, the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one, occupation, and more. Additionally, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census.

 

Isabel Adam & Patrick Henry Sheehy

Isabel Adam (daughter of William Laird Adam and Elizabet O'Conner) married Patrick Sheehy sometime around 1900. They had at least four children: Gladys (born about 1900); Kenneth (born about 1901); William Roderick (1902-1956)); and Isabel (1907-1959). - Glenda Waugh

Gladys Sheehy & Leask Martinelli | Kenneth Sheehy & Byra Wood

Children of Kenneth Sheehy & Byra Wood
Children of Kenneth Sheehy & Byra Wood
Robert Patrick and Terrance William
From The Descendants of William Laird Adam

 

1903 ..........

Misión La Purísima Concepción De María Santísima

Ronald Adam of the Lompoc Record assisted much in the campaign...
Ronald Adam of the Lompoc Record assisted much in the campaign...

 

William Laird Adam

Death of Alameda County Pioneer

William Laird Adam (son of William Thom Adam and Isobel Laird) died on Dec 14, 1903, in Santa Barbara, California and is buried in the Santa Maria Cemetery. - from Find A Grave.

 

William L. Adam 1836-1903
William L. Adam 1836-1903

 

Memoirs of William Laird Adam, 1903 (33 MB pdf)

 

1904 ..........

Elizabeth Russell

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe Gray died on Oct 4, 1904, in Genesee, Latah County, Idaho, at the age of 90 and is buried in the Genesee City Cemetery.

Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe c 1844
Elizabeth Russell c 1844
Photo courtesy Norna Groff, great-great grand daughter of Elizabeth Russell Wardrobe Gray

Elizabeth Gray Died Oct 4, 1904, Aged 94 Years
Elizabeth Gray Died Oct 4, 1904, Aged 94(?) Years

 

Moad, Easton and Nolan families

James Adam Easton is in the back row, the third person from the right
James Adam Easton is in the back row, the third person from the right
His wife Aurora Jennette Moad is the woman standing next to him
This picture was taken in 1904/1905 with Moad, Easton and Nolan families
From Findagrave Memorial # 12446707 for James Adam Easton

 

Frances Easton & Matt Thorburn

We are proud of Matt Thorburn, the Shepherd of our Hills, graduate of the University of Hard Knocks, miner, seaman, farmer and one of the ourstanding men in the history of Wasco county. The photo of Matt Thorburn was obtained from Mrs. Ralph Gifford of Salem. His only son, Matt Thorburn was born at Kingsley (1879) and educated in the St. James college of Vancouver and graduate of Mt. Angel in 1897 and in 1904 married Frances Easton the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Limeroth) Easton of Easton Canyon above Boyd and their daughter lives in The Dalles. - From Wasco County History

 

1905 ..........

The San Bernardino Police Department

After the City of San Bernardino was incorporated under the new rules of incorporation, a Mayor and a Common City Council were elected to office. H.M. Barton was elected the first mayor of San Bernardino. He and the new council took office on May 8, 1905. One of the first orders of business for the new mayor and common council was to appoint a new police force to take office at 12 noon on May 15, 1905. Mayor Barton read a proclamation naming eight officers to the new police department:

John Henderson (son of James Easton and Margaret Adam Henderson) c 1905
John Henderson (son of James Easton and Margaret Adam Henderson) c 1905
From The Origins of the San Bernardino Police Department, May 15, 1905

[ John (Easton) ] Henderson was born on May 29, 1856 in St. Louis Missouri. When he was a small child his father died and his mother migrated to San Bernardino with her children, where she became the 2nd wife of a local Mormon businessman. Mr. Henderson married Asenia Ferrel Wilson and lived for many years at 805 N. Mount Vernon Avenue in San Bernardino. Mr. Henderson came from a large family, with many siblings; however there is no record of him and Mrs. Henderson ever having any children of their own. In the late 1800’s Mr. Henderson was elected to three terms as the San Bernardino City Marshall. After completing his third term he went into the grocery business with future San Bernardino Policeman John Ketring, where they had a small market located at 555 W. 3rd Street. In 1905 Mr. Henderson became one of first officers of the current San Bernardino Police Department. After serving with the San Bernardino Police Department for many years Mr. Henderson went into politics where, in 1919, he was elected to a term as San Bernardino City Mayor. Officer Henderson died in March 1938, at the age of 81 and is buried in San Bernardino’s Pioneer Cemetery, next to Mrs. Henderson.

Robert Nish was born in San Bernardino on January 30, 1862. On June 4, 1890 Mr. Nish married Isabella Shelley-Nish and lived at 1268 W. 7th Street, where they raised two children. Mr. Nish began his law enforcement career as one of the original members of the San Bernardino Police Force in 1905. In 1910 Officer Nish left the San Bernardino Police Department and went to work as a Deputy Sheriff for the San Bernardino County Sheriffs Department until 1920 when he became a railroad car repairman with the Santa Fe Railroad. Mr. Nish’s family became distant to the San Bernardino Valley Area and his only known relative is his grand daughter, Mrs. Shirley Smith of Buena Vista, Colorado. Officer Nish died on July 7, 1936 at Loma Linda hospital at the age of 74, after a long illness and is buried at Mountain View Cemetery.

From The Origins of the San Bernardino Police Department, May 15, 1905

 

Carlyle Alexander Adam & Anna May Laffey

Carlyle Alexander Adam (son of William Laird Adam and Elizabeth O'Conner) married Anna May Laffey around 1905. They had at least four children: Laird (born 1906); Constance (1908-1995); Baetrice (born 1911); and James Richard. (1919-1998).

Constance Adam & Francis Marion Silliman | James Richard Adam & Ann Katherine Caulfield

Children of Constance M. Adam and Francis Silliman
Children of Constance M. Adam and Francis Silliman
Kathleen (Sullivan), Colline (Percoraro), Elizabeth (Corley) and Isabel (Kalich - div) (Good)
From Descendants of William Laird Adam

Children of James Richard Adam and Ann Katherine Caulfield

Constance (McDuffee - div) (Lizalde), James Richard, Jr. and William Laird
From Descendants of William Laird Adam

 

Ronald MacDonald Adam & Malinda Jane Hardenbrook

Ronald MacDonald Adam (son of Alexander Adam and Esther Bradley) married Malinda Jane Hardenbrook on Nov 10, 1905, in Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, California. They had at least three children: Kathryn L. (born about 1907); John Donald (born 1910); and Kenneth L. (born about 1917).

 

1905 ..........

Thomas B. Adam & Grace Thornburgh

Thomas B. Adam (son of William Laird Adam and Elizabeth O'Conner) and married Grace Thornburgh around 1905. They had at least two children: Elizabeth Caroline (1906-1958); and Thomas Basil (1913-1980). - Family Tree 1.6, ancestry.com

Elizabeth Caroline Adam & Frederick Orlo Sherrill, Sr.

Children of Elizabeth Caroline Adam and Frederick Orlo Sherrill
Children of Elizabeth Caroline Adam and Frederick Orlo Sherrill
Frederick Orlo and Elizabeth Ann (Newark)
From Descendants of William Laird Adam

 

1909 ..........

James Campbell Livingston

James Campbell Livingston (husband of both Agnes and Hannah Widdison) died on Oct 17, 1909, in Fountain Green, Utah, at the age of 75.

James C. Livingston passed from this life on October 17, 1909. On the day of the funeral just before the hour for the services, his wife Agnes directed his son Thomas W. and I to go to the basement of the home and get the box containing the remains of his right arm. It will be remembered that he lost the arm by reason of a premature blast while working on the Union Pacific Rail Road in Echo Canyon. He had kept the box containing the arm in a box which was buried in the lost at his home in the 20th ward for many years, taking it to Fountain Green with him at the time of his removal there. I noted that it was at this time in a new box. At the conclusion of the services and when the body was laid in the grave the arm was placed at his right side where it belonged. The burial was in the Fountain Green cemetery. In the year 1910 the family erected a nice monument to his memory. It may there be seen at any time. - from information from James A. Muir compiled by William D. Kuhre, Sandy, Utah, Dec 12, 1935, in James Campbell Livingston

James Campbell Livingston
James Campbell Livingston

FOUNTAIN GREEN, Sanpete Co., Oct. 26. -- The funeral of Patriarch James C. Livingston, who passed to the great beyond Sunday, Oct. 17, at his residence in Fountain Green, Utah, after an illness of over a year, was held in the meetinghouse here Thursday, Oct. 21. Bishop C. J. Christiansen presided, and the ward choir furnished beautiful music. The speakers were Bishop W. D. Kuhre of Sandy, Bishop Jas. A. Muir of Granite, Patriarch John Smith and President Anthon H. Lund of the first presidency, who all came from the north to attend the funeral, all paying high tribute to his noble character. The members of his family were all present at the funeral except two sons and a sister, who were not able to attend.

James C. Livingston was born Dec. 2, 1833, at Shotts, near Lanark, Lanarkshire, Scotland; became a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1849, and came to Salt Lake City Oct. 16, 1853. He worked for a time and lived in the family of Brigham Young, and soon after began work in the Red Butte quarry under John Sharp. His skill in this work and his natural power to lead men soon gained recognition by President Young and others. When the first railroads entered Utah he acted as foreman over a large gang of men and superintended much of the construction work of the Union Pacific and other railroads.

He was offered a position as road master on the Southern Pacific at a good salary, and was called to superintended the temple quarry in Little Cottonwood, Salt Lake county, and accepted the latter, although at a great sacrifice, regarding the call from the president of the Church as the thing to be accepted first. He superintended the temple quarry until the temple was completed.

He was a captain in the military organization in the early days of Utah, and was a member of most of the exploring and Indian schirmishing parties in the pioneer days. he was a member of the police force of Salt Lake City for many years and was a most efficient officer. He was a man of strong personality, and no man met him without being impressed with this fact. He moved to Fountain Green, Sanpete county, about 25 years ago, where he spent his last days. He was married three times and was the father of 18 children, six of whom preceded him to the other side. He was held in the highest esteem wherever known for his unswerving integrity and probity.

- from James Campbell Livingston Obituary
See also James Campbell Livingston Funeral

Read more about James Campbell Livingston

James C Livingston
James C Livingston
Captain Utah Territotial Militia
Indian Wars
Dec 2, 1833 - Oct 17, 1909

 

The Widdison Family

Thomas Widdison Livingston (grandson of Janet Russell)
Thomas Widdison Livingston (grandson of Janet Russell and son of Hannah Widdison),
Thomas Edward Livingston, Myrtle, Reed, Eliza Jane, Afton and Irene (standing in front)
From http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/4530667/person/-591771370

 

Indian War Records

In 1909 the legislature passed a law creating a Board of Commissioners of Indian War Records. Their duties were to ascertain the names of the persons who were members of any organization performing military duties during Indian wars or expeditions against the Indians during territorial years. Veterans completed affidavits of service; two witnesses also completed affidavits supporting the facts. The affidavits were then filed in the office of the chairman of the board, the Adjutant General of the State.

Robert Russell Widdison completed an "Affidavit Concerning Service In Indian Wars Within The State of Utah and of Service Relating Thereto" indicating that he had served under Captain William L. Binder and "was in constant service. Made an expedition against the Indians to Fort Gunnison". See the affidavit.

Charles Livingston's sister Jane also completed an affadavit on behalf of her husband indicating that he had "marched 125 miles to Moroni and was assigned to duty in the North part of Sanpete County. Was in active service until released". See the affidavit.

 
 
Anne Elizabeth Adam (daughter of William Laird Adam and Elizabeth O'Conner) were married around 1911. They had at least three children: Miriam (1912-1996); Patricia Ann (1919-2005); and Katherine M. (1921-2005).

Patricia Ann Preisker & James McLanahan

See California Services Held for Pat McLanahan

 

Charles Preisker

Charles Preisker - A Controversial Potentate of County Politics

Charles Preisker

To many, he was “Mr. Politics.” To others, he was known by the less flattering “Pink Bean Charlie.” By whatever name, there was no ignoring Charles Leo Preisker. For 27 years, this controversial, powerful potentate of county politics wheedled, cajoled, and confronted in an untiring effort to ensure that area government operated in accordance with his vision. - from Charles Preisker - A Controversial Potentate of County Politics

Preisker proved to be a master road builder, cleverly using no bond money, through local labor, new paving materials and business acumen. He sought to have roads designated state and national routes, neatly shifting costs further. A highway to Cuyama opened the Central Valley. After devastating floods in 1911 and 1915, he and other local forward-thinkers like McCoy and Robert Easton became convinced of the need for dams and flood control in the valley. In 1940, Preisker took his crusade to Washington, D.C., where he and Storke, who became an ally, met with Bureau of Reclamation authorities, convincing them to work with county officials, circumventing the state 7 a first. While Preisker left office before Twitchell and Cachuma dams were built, he left the groundwork, guaranteeing both a water supply and flood control for both parts of the county. Now it was South Coast residents who grumbled that power was moving north. So many meetings were held at the Santa Maria Inn, it was dubbed "the little county courthouse." Preisker freely acknowledged the shift. In a 1927 campaign ad, he said, "It is common knowledge that until Supervisor Preisker was elected … the southern end of this county ignored this section. Today (Preisker) sees to it that his district gets a square deal." - from Frank McCoy introduced it to the world, Leo Preisker won it respect at home

See also Charles Leo Preisker

 

U.S. Land Grant to William Z. Adam for San Luis Obispo, California, Oct 1, 1901

U.S. Land Grant to William Z. Adam at Oakland, California, Oct 1, 1901
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1910 ..........

U.S. Land Grant to James C. Livingston, Jr. at Salt Lake City, Utah, March 14, 1910

U.S. Land Grant to James C. Livingston, Jr. at Salt Lake City, Utah, March 14, 1910
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1910 United States Federal Census - Genesee, Idaho
Elizabeth Russell's son Andrew Wardrobe and his family
 

Name: Andrew M Wardrobe
Age in 1910: 70
Estimated Birth Year: 1840
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of House: Head
Father's Birth Place: Scotland
Mother's Birth Place: Scotland
Spouse's Name: Isabelle Wardrobe
Home in 1910: Genesee, Latah, Idaho
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Gender: Male
Year of immigration: 1865
Household Members:
Name Age
Andrew M Wardrobe 70
Isabelle Wardrobe 57
Mary B Wardrobe 27
John H Wardrobe 22
Andrew C Wardrobe 22
Melvin Wardrobe 19
Jessie Wardrobe 17
Dewey Wardrobe 12
Bruce Wardrobe 9
William W Gray 56

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Genesee, Latah, Idaho; Roll: T624_225; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 0186; Image: 826; FHL Number: 1374238. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

William Gray is Andrew's step brother.
John Henry, Andrew Charles, and Dewey would all serve in World War I as well as their brother William.

1910 United States Federal Census - Genesee, Idaho
Elizabeth Russell's son Robert R. Gray and his family

Name: Robert R Gray
Age in 1910: 57
Birth Year: 1853
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1910: Genesee, Latah, Idaho
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Elizabeth Gray
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert R Gray 57
Elizabeth Gray 43
Charles Gray 16
Mary Gray 12
Luceil Gray 8
Cecil Gray 7
Jesse Gray 4
Albert Gray 20

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Genesee, Latah, Idaho; Roll: T624_225; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0186; Image: 812; FHL Number: 1374238. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

Basketball was started in 1910. Since the beginning of basketball in Genesee teams have always fared above teams from other schools of the same size. Teams comprised of the wardrobes, the grays and Herb Martinson became famous in the inland empire. One of these gentlemen, Wm. Gray, established a scholarship and as you know many Genesee graduates have been and will continue to be recipients. Those early teams played and won from the university of Idaho prep and Washington state college, among others. Schools were played in Spokane. Genesee won the Inland Empire championship in 1911-12. A right to the championship was disputed and a game played on a neutral court. Genesee defeated Rathdrum for the championship 18-16. - from Early School History, Genesee Community History

1910 United States Federal Census - Sublett, Cassia, Idaho
Elizabeth Russell's daughter Isabella Gray and her family

Name: Isabelle Powers
Age in 1910: 60
Birth Year: 1850
Birthplace: Missouri
Home in 1910: Sublett, Cassia, Idaho
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Henry C Powers
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Henry C Powers 64
Isabelle Powers 60
Henry H Powers 22
John Powers 20
Andrew Powers 18
Margaret Powers 26
Paul Malliott 34

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Sublett, Cassia, Idaho; Roll: T624_223; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 0111; Image: 497; FHL Number: 1374236. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

Their son Isaac and his wife and family were living next door.

 

1910 United States Federal Census - Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah
James C. Livingston, Jr. and family
 

Name: James C Livingston
Age in 1910: 52
Birth Year: 1858
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1910: Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
[Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Phebe A Livingston
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
James C Livingston 52
Phebe A Livingston 53
Ivy Livingston 18
Mabel Livingston 12

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah; Roll: T624_1608; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0153; Image: 224; FHL Number: 1375621. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA  Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

James occupation was "Farmer". His mother, Agnes Widdison Livingston (79), was living next door.

1910 United States Federal Census - Hooper, Weber, Utah
James G. Widdison and his family
 

Name: James G. Widdison
Age in 1910: 57
Birth Year: 1853
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1910: Hooper, Weber, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1857
[1852] 
Relation to Head of House: Head
[Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Alice Widdison
Father's Birthplace: England
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
James G. Widdison 57
Alice Widdison 53 
Willard Widdison 23
Eugene Widdison 21
Ange Widdison 19
Lucinda Widdison 16
Thomas R Widdison 14
Albert P Widdison 12
Widdison 10
Jennett E Widdison 7

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Hooper, Weber, Utah; Roll: T624_1611; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 0218; Image: 126; FHL Number: 1375624. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

James occupation is "mail carrier".

James Gourley Widdison and Family
James Gourley Widdison and Family

 

1910 United States Federal Census - Hooper, Weber, Utah
James G. Widdison, Jr. and his family
 

Name: James G. Widdison Jr.
Age in 1910: 30
Birth Year: 1880
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1910: Hooper, Weber, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
[Self (Head)
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Lillian Widdison
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: England
Household Members:
Name Age
James J Widdison Jr. 30
Lillian Widdison 27
Vilota Widdison 1 10/12
[1] 
Marion Widdison 6/12

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Hooper, Weber, Utah; Roll: T624_1611; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 0218; Image: 126; FHL Number: 1375624. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

James, Jr.'s occupation is "farmer".

 

1910 United States Federal Census - Santa Maria, Santa Barbara, California
William C. Adam and his family
 

Name: William C Adam
Birthplace: California
Home in 1910: Santa Maria Ward 2, Santa Barbara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Ada V Adam
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Canada English
[Canada] 
Household Members:
Name Age
William C Adam  
Ada V Adam 42
Irma K Adam 20
Phyllis E Adam 18
Edna C Adam 16
Leonard H Adam 15

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Santa Maria Ward 2, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: T624_105; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 0183; Image: 261; FHL microfilm: 1374118. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

1910 United States Federal Census - Cholame, San Luis Obispo, California
John Grant (son of Robert Grant and Isabelle Adam) and Margaret Nish

Name: John W Fraut
[John W Grant] 
[John W Frant] 
[John W Grant
Age in 1910: 71
Birth Year: abt 1839
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1910: Cholame, San Luis Obispo, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1844
[1842] 
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Margaret Fraut
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
John W Fraut 71
Margaret Fraut 57
Jessie M Fraut 23
Archie Fraut 19
Izra Fraut 35
Nieles Sutbin 16

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Cholame, San Luis Obispo, California; Roll: T624_104; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0033; FHL microfilm: 1374117. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

 

1910 United States Federal Census - San Bernardino, California
John Alexander Henderson (son of James Easton and Margaret Adam Henderson) & Asenia Ferrel Wilson

Name: John A Henderson
Age in 1910: 51
Birth Year: 1859
Birthplace: California
Home in 1910: San Bernardino Ward 5, San Bernardino, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Senia Henderson
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
John A Henderson 51
Senia Henderson 42

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: San Bernardino Ward 5, San Bernardino, California; Roll: T624_94; Page: 15A; Enumeration District: 0123; Image: 900; FHL microfilm: 1374107. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

John Henderson's occupation is "Policeman"

1910 United States Federal Census - Santa Barbara, California
Ronald MacDonald Adam (son of Alexander Adam and Esther Bradley) & Malinda Jane Hardenbrook and family
 

Name: Ronald M Adam
Age in 1910: 25
Birth Year: abt 1885
Birthplace: California
Home in 1910: Township 5, Santa Barbara, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Linda J Adam
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: England
Household Members:
Name Age
Ronald M Adam 25
Linda J Adam 26
Kathryn L Adam 3
John D Adam 1
[1 3/12] 

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Township 5, Santa Barbara, California; Roll: T624_105; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0178; FHL microfilm: 1374118. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

 

1910 United States Federal Census - Salinas, Monterey, California
Robert Easton (son of Jemima Adam and George Easton) & Mary Hoey

Name: Robert Easton
Age in 1910: 56
Birth Year: abt 1854
Birthplace: Utah
Home in 1910: Salinas Ward 3, Monterey, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: Mary Easton
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert Easton 56
Mary Easton 42
Ebeth Easton 20
Horace Easton 16
Helen Easton 14

Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Salinas Ward 3, Monterey, California; Roll: T624_89; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 0004; FHL microfilm: 1374102. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Description: This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

 

U.S. Land Grant to William A. Adam for Madera, Riverside, California, Nov 25, 1910

U.S. Land Grant to William A. Adam at Los Angeles, California, Nov 25, 1910
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1911 ..........

U.S. Land Grant to Charles A. Adam for San Luis Obispo, California, April 24, 1911

U.S. Land Grant to Charles A. Adam for San Luis Obispo, California, April 24, 1911
From US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records
See original document

 

1912 ..........

Margaret Easton

Margaret Easton Moffitt (daughter of Robert Easton and Elizabeth Laird) died on Jan 12, 1912.

OBITUARY: The Manti Messenger, Friday 12 January 1912:

Death of Mrs. Margaret Moffitt

Mrs. Margaret E. Moffitt died in Orangeville Tuesday morning and the remains were brought to this city yesterday. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon. Mrs. Moffit was born in Glasgow, Scotland, September 24, 1834. She came to Manti in 1861 and lived here nearly 47 years. She then went to Orangeville where she lived the last three years. The children surviving her are Mrs. Maggie Judd, Spencer and Russel Moffit of this city, Mrs. Harriet B. Snow, Mrs. Nettie Crawford, and Chas. A. Moffit of Orangeville, John, Wallace and Edward of the Uintah reservation. All the children are expected to attend the funeral tomorrow. Her husband, Andrew J. Moffitt died in this city 19 years ago.

 

William Zimry Adam

Rosetta "Rosie" Doty, William Zimry Adam, Donald Adam, Bessie, Velma Adam, William A. Adam and Alexander Zimry Adam
Rosetta "Rosie" Doty, William Zimry Adam, Donald Adam, Bessie Doty, Velma Adam, William A. Adam and Alexander Adam
Rosie is William Zimry Adam's wife and Donald and Velma are their children
William A. Adam is the son of Alexander Adam and Esther Bradley

 

David Glen Henderson

Charlotte (Stapley) Hawker, son-in-law David Glen Henderson and Charlotte's daughter, Matilda (Hawker) Henderson.
Charlotte (Stapley) Hawker, son-in-law David Glen Henderson and Charlotte's daughter, Matilda (Hawker) Henderson.
Taken on the occasion of David and Matilda's 50th wedding anniversary.
Photo courtesy Chloe Perdew

Matilda and David's 50th wedding anniversary

Sitting in front row, left to right: David 'Dave' Thomas Henderson; Alexander 'Alec' Henderson, Matilda Caroline (Hawker) Henderson (mother of the 10 adult children pictured); Matilda's mother, Charlotte (Stapley) Hawker and Matilda's husband, David Glen Henderson.
Middle row: Grover Cleveland Henderson; Robert 'Rob' Roy Henderson; Nettie Jeannette (Henderson) Perdew; William 'Bill' Penn Henderson; and Margaret 'Maggie' (Henderson) Anderson.
Back row: Earle Elmer Henderson and Walter 'Walt' Scott Henderson. Pictured up on top left: Lottie Belle (Henderson) St. Clair Watson. Occasion: Matilda and David's 50th wedding anniversary.
Photo courtesy Chloe Perdew

ETIWANDA

CELEBRATION OF A GOLDEN WEDDING
Friends Gather For a Happy Reunion Event at the Henderson Home

Etiwanda, March 28 (1912) - (Staff correspondence of THE SUN) - Mr. and Mrs. D.G. Henderson of Etiwanda celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding today at their home, surrounded by relatives, and all but one of their ten children, and 25 grandchildren. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson have resided in Etiwanda for many years and were previously residents of San Bernardino, where their wedding occurred, their families being among the early settlers of the valley.

A special guest of honor at today's notable gathering was Mrs. Charlotte Hawker of San Bernardino, the mother of Mrs. Henderson, who will tomorrow celebrate her 89th birthday.

A celebration feast was served at noon, two huge turkeys being features and a 12-pound fruit cake, with a special wedding cake also. The decorations were profuse, long branches of Lady Banksia (roses), in white and gold and mountain ferns being used about the rooms with Marie Henriette roses.

A number of pictures of the company and the group of grandchildren and the children of Mr. and Mrs. Henderson were made by Artist Shagner of San Bernardino.

A number of gifts were received, the sons having presented a handsome gold clock and the mother of Mrs. Henderson, a beautiful gold sugar spoon.

Mrs. Sinclair of Rock Creek was the only one of the couple's children unable to be present, being detained at home by illness. The others present were William, Robert, Walter, Alex, David, Grover and Earl Henderson, and Mrs. Nettie Perdew and Mrs. James Anderson of Highland, with their families.

Mrs. Victor Delor of San Bernardino, sister of Mrs. Henderson, was a guest also.

- from David Glen Henderson (1842-1926) - Find A Grave Memorial

 

1914 ..........

The Great War, 1914 - 1918

We Remember

William, John Henry, Andrew Charles, and Dewey Wardrobe and Wilmot A. Easton served in World War I.

Austrian Heir and His Wife Murdered
Austrian Heir and His Wife Murdered
From New York Times, page 8, June 29, 1914

The assassination on 28 June 1914 of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary, was the proximate trigger of the Great War. Long-term causes, such as imperialistic foreign policies of the great powers of Europe, such as the German Empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire, the Russian Empire, the British Empire, France, and Italy, played a major role. Ferdinand's assassination by a Yugoslav nationalist resulted in a Habsburg ultimatum against the Kingdom of Serbia. Several alliances formed over the past decades were invoked, so within weeks the major powers were at war; via their colonies, the conflict soon spread around the world. - From Wikipedia

 

John Grant

John Grant (son of Robert Grant and Isabelle Adam) died in Nov, 1914.

Old Resident Passes Beyond

John Grant died in 1914


John W. Grant 1838-1914

 

1915 ..........

Struck By Train

Robert Wardrobe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Wardrobe of Genesee
Robert Wardrobe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Wardrobe of Genesee
From Idaho Statesman, Tuesday, February 9, 1915

Both Arms Amputated


Robert Wardrobe Resting Easy - Public Suspects Foul Play
From Idaho Statesman, Thursday, February 11, 1915

 

1917 ..........

Andrew Charles Wardrobe registered for the draft for World War I.

Draft Registration Card for Andrew Charles Wardrobe, 1917-1918
Draft Registration Card for Andrew Charles Wardrobe, 1917-1918
See original document

 
1918 ..........

The Second Regiment of Engineers

The Second Regiment of Engineers, Wardrobe, Dewey; Address unknown; D; Pvt.; Prepn.; EW, Chateau Thierry. Company D. EW denotes Evacuated Wounded (and not returned to duty). Each platoon of Company "D" was assigned to a company of the 6th Marines. It was used in the firing line as Infantry when the men could not work at consolidating positions. It was also in the line during the German attack of June 2nd which was repulsed. It was relieved on the morning of June 5th at 3: 00 A. M. and marched to a reserve position south of Marigny where it remained in reserve until 10: 00 P. M. on the evening of June 5th, 1918. On the night of the 5th it moved to the woods near La Voie du Chatel. On the morning of the 6th it moved to Hill 142 with Company "E" and part of Company "F" and assisted in Major Turrell's Battalion of the 5th Marines. When on June 8th the enemy launched a determined counter attack, which was directed against the Marine Brigade, "D" Company of the Engineers was in the line as Infantry and helped to repulse the Germans. - from The Second Regiment of Engineers - Chateau Thierry

American troops in public Square of Chateau-Thierry after its capture, July, 1918
American troops in public Square of Chateau-Thierry after its capture, July, 1918

Chateau-Thierry, July, 1918, Place de l'Hotel et Rue du Pont
Chateau-Thierry, July, 1918, Place de l'Hotel et Rue du Pont

The following is the report of the Commanding Officer of Company "D" relative to the action in Belleau Woods: "Company "D" on June 11th, 1918, was ordered from the rest camp in Bois-Gros-Jean to report to Lieutenant Colonel Wise at the edge of Belleau Woods. Upon reporting there at or about 4:00 P.M. the same date, the company was ordered to the firing line position on the northwest corner of the woods. After wandering around the woods, we arrived at the designated positions about 7:30 P.M. This position was very much exposed to Artillery, machine gun and trench mortar fire, and was also bombed by aeroplanes.

"The dispositions of Platoons: The first Platoon under First Lieutenant L. M. Chase was taken into action with the Marines against machine gun positions: this platoon soon ran out of ammunition, but managed to pick up more in the woods. This engagement lasted about half an hour. After the engagement, the platoon took its position with the Company, and dug in. This platoon went into action with 44 men, and came out with 26.

"The Second Platoon assisted the Marines as Raiding Parties. After the raiding parties came in they rejoined the Company and entrenched themselves. This platoon was in a very exposed position, and was subjected to artillery, machine gun and trench battery fire. The platoon was also subjected to heavy mustard gas attacks.

"The Third Platoon remained in the line held by the Company the entire time, and was subjected to artillery and machine gun fire.

"The Fourth Platoon was not called on to leave the Company position. It was subjected to artillery and machine gun fire and bombing by aeroplane, and was exposed to searchlights operated by the Germans. This made their position an extremely hard one to hold."

During this action, Corporal Joseph D. Sanders displayed extraordinary heroism and was later awarded the D.S.C. While in command of an important outpost, he exposed himself to rifle and shellfire to better observe the movements of the enemy. He was knocked unconscious by a shell burst, but returned to this post immediately upon regaining consciousness. On June 13th, he carried a wounded officer through an intense barrage to a dressing station.

Private William J. Steimel also displayed extraordinary heroism by refusing to go to the rear until his mission was completed although he was severely wounded in several places by an enemy hand grenade. After receiving first aid treatment, he again returned to the front line although it was at the time being subjected to a severe shelling.

- from History of the Second Engineers 1916-1919, Chateau Thierry - June 1918

The American Cemetery at "Au Bois Belleau" - Chateau Thierry, 1918
The American Cemetery at "Au Bois Belleau" - Chateau Thierry, 1918

 
Official History of the Second Engineers in the World War 1916-1919, by Regimental Headquarters (19MB pdf)

 

Watsonville, Santa Cruz County, California

Martinelli's Soda & Cider Works

Martinelli's Gold Medal Apple Juice

Stephen G. Martinelli, 1843-1918
Stephen G. Martinelli, 1843-1918
Photo courtesy Boyle Family Tree on ancestry.com

Martinelli's Soda & Cider Works
Photo courtesy Martinelli & Company

After the first few years in his brother's barn, Stephen G. Martinelli moved his expanding cider business to its present location on 3rd St. (now East Beach Street) in the center of Watsonville. There was still no railroad in the area. A steam powered cider mill was constructed, with tanks, casks, and bottling equipment for production on an enlarged scale.
 

Bottling Apple Juice, October 1917
Bottling Apple Juice, October 1917
Photo courtesy Martinelli & Company

Gladys Sheehy & Leask Martinelli

NEPHEW OF SAMUEL LEASK WEDS MISS GLADYS SHEEHY
Leask Martinelli, son of the late pioneer cider manufacturer of Watsonville and a nephew of Samuel Leask of this city, Was married in Holiister yesterday morning to Miss Gladys Sheehy, daughter of Mrs. Belle Sheehy of Watsonville. Rev. P. D. Hassett was the officiating clergyman. - Santa Cruz Evening News, 30 November, 1918

Gladys Sheehy (daughter of Isabel Adam and Patrick Henry Sheehy) married Leask Martinelli (son of Stephen Martinelli and Jennie Leask) Nov 29, 1918. They had at least three children: Patricia (born about 1920); Charles (1921-1992); and Barbara (born June 17, 1922, died Sept 11, 2010).

Patricia Gladys Martinelli & Patrick James Dooling, Sr.

I just found the 1920 census showing Gladys Sheehy (granddaughter of William Laird Adam - daughter of his daughter Isabel) married to Leask Martinelli - proprietor of a cider & soda company - as in Martinelli apple juice. The company website says it was started in Pajaro Valley by Stephen Martinelli from Switzerland. On Leask Martinelli's WWI draft registration he says his father was born in Switzerland. Also says he (Leask) was employed by S. Martinelli & Co. - Glenda Waugh

 

Velma Adam & Clyde Dayton

Velma Adam (daughter of William Zimry Adam and Rosetta Doty) married Clyde Dayton sometime in 1918.

In 1918, Velma Adam married Clyde Dayton, a neighbor boy. They farmed, built a home, boosted their community and raised two sons, Newell C. (who was residing in King City at the time of her death) and William P. Dayton of Hesperia. Clyde passed away in 1972 and Velma married Frank Roberson in 1979. - from Velma A. Adam Dayton, Find A Grave Memorial

 

 
1919 ..........

John Henderson Elected Mayor

John Henderson (son of James Easton and Margaret Adam Henderson) was elected Mayor of San Bernardino, California.  - from John Alexander Henderson - Find A Grave

From Riverside Daily Press: Riverside, California, Tuesday Evening, April 15, 1919
From Roverside Daily Press: Riverside, California, Tuesday Evening, April 15, 1919
See original document

Graves Are Ancient

From Riverside Enterprise, Saturday Morning, May 24, 1919
From Riverside Enterprise, Saturday Morning, May 24, 1919
See original document

No Increase for Policemen

From Riverside Enterprise, Saturday Morning, August 30, 1919
From Riverside Enterprise, Saturday Morning, August 30, 1919
See original document

John Alexander Henderson, the popular and efficient mayor of San Bernardino from May, 1919, to May, 1921.
John Alexander Henderson, the popular and efficient mayor of San Bernardino from May, 1919, to May, 1921.
From History of San Bernardino and Riverside counties with selected biography of actors and witnesses of the period of growth and achievement. (Volume 2) - Brown, John

 

Horace Robert Easton & Lida Hyatt

Horace Robert Easton (son of Robert Easton and Mary Hoey) married Lida Hyatt sometime around 1919. They had at least four children: Rockwell (born 1920); Marjorie (born about 1922); Phyllis (born about 1925); and Helen Jean (born about 1926). - 1920 & 1930 US Federal Census'

Helen Jean Easton & Robert Johnson Wardwell

See Family Group Sheet for Horace Robert Easton

 

1920 ..........

Agnes Widdison


Agnes Widdison (daughter of Janet Russell and Thomas Widdison)

Agnes Widdison (widow of James Campbell Livingston and daughter of Janet Russell and Thomas Widdison) died on May 19, 1920, in Fountain Green, Sanpete, Utah, USA, at the age of 90, and is buried in the Fountain Green Cemetery. - from http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/4530667/person/-591747541

 

1920 United States Federal Census - Genesee, Idaho
Elizabeth Russell's son Andrew Wardrobe and his family
 
Name: A M Wardrobe
Home in 1920: Genesee, Latah, Idaho
Age: 80
[30] 
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1840
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head) 
Spouse's Name: Isabel Wardrobe
Father's Birth Place: Scotland
Mother's Birth Place: Scotland
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Sex: Male
Home owned: Own
Year of immigration: 1835
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Household Members:
Name Age
A M Wardrobe 80
Isabel Wardrobe 64
Andrew Chas Wardrobe 31
John Henry Wardrobe 31
Della Wardrobe 31
[35] 
Dewey Ray Wardrobe 22
Bruce Harold Wardrobe 19

Source Citation: Year: 1920;Census Place: Genesee, Latah, Idaho; Roll: T625_292; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 120; Image: 408. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City). Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1920 United States Federal Census, the Fourteenth Census of the United States. It includes all states and territories, as well as Military and Naval Forces, the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, and the Panama Canal Zone. The census provides many details about individuals and families including: name, gender, age, birthplace, year of immigration, mother tongue, and parents’ birthplaces. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1920 Federal Census.

 

1920 United States Federal Census - Ward 3, Salt Lake City, Utah
Robert R. Widdison
 

Name: Robert R Weddeson
Age: 75
Birth Year: abt 1845
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1920: Salt Lake City Ward 3, Salt Lake, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1853
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
[Head] 
Marital Status: Widowed
[Widow] 
Father's Birthplace: England
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Home Owned: Own
Able to Read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Household Members:
Name Age
Robert R Weddeson 75

Source Citation: Year: 1920;Census Place: Salt Lake City Ward 3, Salt Lake, Utah; Roll: T625_1866; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 131; Image: 483. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).  Description: This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1920 United States Federal Census, the Fourteenth Census of the United States. It includes all states and territories, as well as Military and Naval Forces, the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, and the Panama Canal Zone. The census provides many details about individuals and families including: name, gender, age, birthplace, year of immigration, mother tongue, and parents’ birthplaces. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1920 Federal Census.

 

1920 United States Federal Census - Hooper, Weber, Utah
James Gourley Widdison and family
 

Name: James G Widdison
Age: 67
Birth Year: abt 1853
Birthplace: Scotland
Home in 1920: Hooper, Weber, Utah
Race: White
Gender: Male
Immigration Year: 1880
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
Marital Status: Widowed
Father's Birthplace: Scotland
Mother's Birthplace: Scotland
Home Owned: Own
Able to Read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Household Members:
Name Age
James G Widdison 67
Thomas R Widdison 24
Gilbert P Widdison 21
Arvella Widdison 19
Janette Widdison 17

Source Citation: Year: 1920;Census Place: Hooper,