The Waugh Family
An historical and photographic perspective

John Rogerson Waugh, c 1885
John Rogerson Waugh, c 1885

John Rogerson Waugh &

Agnes Rennie
Born: August 1, 1833 Born: April 24, 1836 (Glenda Waugh)
Place: Lairdholme, Tundergarth, Scotland  Place: Carluke, Lanarkshire
Married: February 13, 1857
Place: Carluke, Lanarkshire
Died: March 7, 1908   Died: Oct 18, 1915
Place: Morningside, Edinburgh   Place: Hillend Garden, Lesmahagow
Buried: Buried:

Mary Waugh & Gavin Stewart Scott | Lillias Rennie Waugh & Alexander Thom Cringan | Elizabeth Waugh & George Robertson

John Rogerson Waugh was the brother of William Waugh and uncle of John (the Joker) Waugh. He was probably named in honour of Dr. John Rogerson of Lochmaben who served as a Medical Doctor to Catherine the Great of Russia.

John Rogerson Waugh and Agnes Rennie were married on February 13, 1857, in the United Presbyterian Church in Carluke. They had five children: Mary Waugh (born January 13, 1858, in Cambusnethan), Isabella Waugh (born April 29, 1859, in Cambusnethan), Lillias "Lily" Rennie Waugh (born February 24, 1861, in Cambusnethan), Elizabeth "Lizzie" Waugh (born November 29, 1862, in Cambusnethan), and George Waugh (born April 25, 1865, in Cambusnethan).

Children Born Place Died Place
Mary Jan 13, 1858 Cambusnethan March 31, 1937 Crossford, Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire
Isabella April 29, 1859 Cambusnethan Aug 23, 1944 Avondale and Glassford, Lanarkshire
Lillias Rennie Feb 24, 1861 Cambusnethan May 10, 1929 Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Elizabeth Nov 29, 1862 Cambusnethan Dec 3, 1945 Edinburgh
George April 25, 1865 Cambusnethan Nov 11, 1909 Edinburgh

Mary Waugh & Gavin Stewart Scott | Lillias Rennie Waugh & Alexander Thom Cringan | Elizabeth Waugh & George Robertson

 

 

The Rennie Side of the Family

Agnes Rennie's parents were James Rennie (born c. 1795) and Mary Scott (born c 1797).

1841 Scotland Census - Carluke, Lanarkshire

James Rennie's occupation was listed as "Cotton Handloom Weaver".

Name: Agnes Rennie
Age: 10
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1831
Gender: Female
Where born: Scotland
Civil Parish: Carluke
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Carluke Crawford St
Parish Number: 629
Household Members:
Name Age
James Rennie 46
Mary Rennie 44
David Rennie 17
William Rennie 15
Lilias Rennie 13
Agnes Rennie 10
Isabella Rennie 5
Alison Rennie 3

Source Citation: Parish: Carluke; ED: 1; Page:  4; Line: 960; Roll: CSSCT1841_103-0430; Year: 1841. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1841 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: 1841 Scotland Census. Edinburgh, Scotland: General Register Office for Scotland. Reels 1-151. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1841 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 6 June 1841.

1851 Scotland Census - Carluke, Lanarkshire

Name: James Rennie
Age: 56
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1795
Relationship: Head
Spouse's Name: Mary
Gender: Male
Where born: Carluke, Lanark
Parish Number: 629
Civil Parish: Carluke
Town: Carluke
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Old Brigend
Occupation: Hand Loom Weaver (cotton)
ED: 1
Household schedule number: 86
Line: 14
Roll: CSSCT1851_150
Household Members:
Name Age
James Rennie 56
Mary Rennie 54
William Rennie 25
Lilias Rennie 23
Agness Rennie 20
James Rennie 9

Source Citation: Parish: Carluke; ED: 1; Page: 14; Line: 21; Roll: 1073; Year: 1851. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1851 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Scotland. 1851 Scotland Census. Reels 1-217. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1851 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 30/31 March 1851. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1851 Scotland Census - Hollows Mill, Canonbie
(uncertain)

Name: WAUGH , John
Address: Hollows Mill(814)
Parish: Canonbie
Relationship: household of John Graham
Marital Status: unmarried
Occupation: SERVANT farm
Age: 20
Born: born Middlebie Dms
Household No: 12/43

 

1861 ..........

1861 Scotland Census - Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire

Name: John Waugh
Age: 28
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1833
Relationship: Head
Spouse's name : Agnes
Gender: Male
Where born: Tennergarth, Dumfries
Registration Number: 628
Registration district: Cambusnethan
Civil Parish: Cambusnethan
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Darngavel Cottage
Occupation: Coal Miner
ED: 16
Household schedule number: 42
Line: 22
Roll: CSSCT1861_93
Household Members:
Name Age
John Waugh 28
Agnes Rennie 30
Mary Waugh 3
Lillias Waugh 1 Mo
Isabella Waugh 1

Source Citation: Parish: Cambusnethan; ED: 16; Page:  8; Line: 22; Roll: CSSCT1861_93; Year: 1861. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1861 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data: Scotland. 1861 Scotland Census. Reels 1-150. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1861 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 7/8 April 1861. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

Just to the north of Darngavel is Blackhall Cottage where John's brother William Waugh married Alison Lindsay  on Nov 29, 1861.  William Waugh and Alison Lindsay had children born at Kirkhall, Auchterhead,  Summerside, and Daviesdyke (Kirkhall or Diura). John Rogerson Waugh's parents George Waugh and Isabella Barclay were also living in Allanton, Cambusnethan during the 1870s and until their deaths in 1877 and 1878.

RCAHMS Archaeology Notes for KirkhallDaviesdykes & Darngavel Cottage

Map showing location of Darngavel Cottage c 1861
Map showing location of Darngavel Cottage c 1861
More detailed maps showing Darngavel, Kirkhall, Auchterhead, Summerside, and Daviesdykes

 

1871 ..........

1871 Scotland Census - Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire

Name: John Waugh
Age: 38
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1833
Relationship: Head
Spouse's name : Agnes
Gender: Male
Where born: Finnergath, Wigtonshire
Registration Number: 628
Registration district: Cambusnethan
Civil Parish: Cambusnethan
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Damside
Occupation: Coal Miner
ED: 1
Household schedule number: 42
Line: 10
Roll: CSSCT1871_120
Household Members:
Name Age
John Waugh 38
Agnes Waugh 40
Mary Waugh 13
Isabella Waugh 11
Lillias Waugh 10
Elizabeth Waugh 8
George Waugh 5

Source Citation: Parish: Cambusnethan; ED: 1; Page:  7; Line: 10; Roll: CSSCT1871_120; Year: 1871. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1871 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1871 Scotland Census. Reels 1-191. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1871 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 2/3 April 1871. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1876 ..........

Mary Waugh & Gavin Stewart Scott

Mary Waugh
Mary Waugh
From http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/13065203/person/-1233528

Gavin Stewart Scott c. 1906
Gavin Stewart Scott c. 1906

Mary Waugh married Gavin Stewart Scott (ploughman, son of Gavin Scott, farmer, and Jane Duncan) on Jan 3, 1876, at Orchard Colliery in Carluke. They had at least eleven children: Gavin (born Aug 10, 1876); John (born Nov 9, 1878, died July 10, 1974); Thomas (born about 1882); George (born about 1883); Agnes (born about 1885); James (1887-1954); Alexander (1889-1961); Janet (born about 1892); Isabella (born Dec 6, 1893); Mary (born Sept 22, 1895); and Lillias (born about 1900).

John Waugh Scott & Margaret Green |Thomas Scott & Agnes Rennie Robertson | George Waugh Scott & Grace Welsh Guthrie
Agnes Scott & James Glover | James Scott & Jean Dykes | Alexander Scott & Jean Rae Kinnear | Isabella Scott & John Lockhart Steele
Mary Scott & Walter Forrest | Lillias Scott & Lindsay Steele

Alexander Scott was born on the 31st July 1889 at Lesmahagow. One of a family of eleven, he had five brothers and five sisters. He was the sixth and youngest son of Gavin, a Lanarkshire farmer, and his wife Mary Waugh, whom he married in 1876. It was a remarkable family. Seven of them graduated from the University of Glasgow, and all of them had successful lives. Although the family was deeply attached to the land, there was something of a Scott 'diaspora'. The eldest brother, Gavin, went off to make a career in Rangoon. Another, George, became a Medical Officer on the rubber and tin estates in Malaya. James became a Mining Engineer in Nairobi, Bella farmed in Rhodesia and Alexander spent much of his working life in Malaysia. Perhaps it is not surprising that their father, Gavin, became a conscientious and prolific letter writer. Ruth Richens, his granddaughter, edited and published these letters, which offer a unique insight into Scottish society in wartime and into young Alexander Scott's war experiences as a newly qualified Doctor at the Front. - from Biography of Captain (Temporary Commission) Alexander Scott

See also...
Biography of 2nd Lieutenant James Scott
Scott, G. Papers, Received through the good offices of Dr. N. Bullock

 

1880 ..........

Lillias Rennie Waugh, c 1880
Lillias Rennie Waugh, c 1880

 

1881 ..........

1881 Scotland Census - Carluke, Lanarkshire
John Waugh & Agnes Rennie

Name: John Waugh
Age: 48
Estimated birth year: abt 1833
Relationship: Head
Spouse's name : Agnes
Gender: Male
Where born: Tundergath, Dumfreishire
Registration Number: 629
Registration district: Carluke
Civil parish: Carluke
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Orchard Colliery Row
Occupation: Colliery Oversman
ED: 5
Household schedule number: 154
Line: 3
Roll: cssct1881_208
Household Members:
Name Age
John Waugh 48
Agnes Waugh 50
Ellizabeth Waugh 18

Source Citation: Parish: Carluke; ED: 5; Page:  41; Line: 3; Roll  cssct1881_208; Year: 1881. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1881 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.   Original data: Scotland. 1881 Scotland Census. Reels 1-338. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1881 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 3/4 April 1881. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

Orchard Row, Overtown

This is a row of 36 two-apartment houses owned by Houldsworth of Coltness, and let at a rental of 2s. 3d. per week, exclusive of rates. There are no sculleries. Water is supplied by two stands in front of the row. Dust-bins are in use, and scavenging of a sort is done regularly. Dry-closets of a very unsatisfactory type are in use. There are small gardens in front of those houses. [Evidence presented to Royal Commission, 25th March 1914]
http://www.scottishmining.co.uk/143.html

1881 Scotland Census - Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire
Mary Waugh (daughter of John Waugh & Agnes Rennie) and Gavin Scott

Name: Mary W Scott
Age: 23
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1858
Relationship: Wife
Spouse's name : Gavin J Scott
Gender: Female
Where born: Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire
Registration number: 649
Registration District: Lesmahagow
Civil Parish: Lesmahagow
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Underbank
Occupation: Farmer Wife
ED: 15
Household Schedule Number: 42
Line: 18
Roll: cssct1881_262
Household Members:
Name Age
Gavin J Scott Jr. 30
Mary W Scott 23
Gavin Scott 4
John Scott 2

Source Citation: Parish: Lesmahagow; ED: 15; Page: 23; Line: 18; Roll: cssct1881_262. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1881 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1881 Scotland Census. Reels 1-338. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1881 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 3/4 April 1881. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1882 ..........

Lillias Rennie Waugh & Alexander Thom Cringan

Lillias Rennie Waugh married Alexander Thom Cringam on Aug 18, 1882. Alexander Thom Cringan was born on Oct 13, 1860, in Carluke, Lanarkshire. His parent's were Robert Cringan (b. 1821) and Janet Thom (b. 1826). They were married on Oct 1, 1841, in Clarkson.

Alexander Cringan and Agnes Rennie had eleven children: Robert Ellis Cringan (Aug 10, 1883 - Aug, 1907); John Waugh Cringan (July 23, 1885 - April 18, 1949); Agnes Rennie Cringan (March 31, 1887 - Jan 25, 1968); Janet Thom Cringan (Feb 27, 1889 - May 10, 1972); Lillias Waugh Cringan (Dec 20, 1890 - July 13, 1967); Elizabeth Russell Cringan (Dec 20, 1893 - Oct, 1983); Isobel Margaret Cringan (Jan 31, 1895 - Jan 30, 1966); Annie Clark Cringan (Feb 3, 1897 - Dec 4, 1977); Helen MacDonald Cringan (June 11, 1899 - Feb 2, 1924); Marie Alexander Cringan (July 31, 1901 - Jan 11, 1992); and Catherine Gartshore Cringan (April 25, 1907 - March 13, 1960). - from Alex Cringan See more about Alexander Thom Cringan from Alex Cringan.

 

John Rogerson Waugh & Agnes Rennie and Family

John Rogerson Waugh, Agnes Rennie with children
John Rogerson Waugh, Agnes Rennie with children
Orchard Colliery, Carluke, Lanarskshire c 1885
Courtesy of Alex Cringan

 

1886 ..........

Alexander Thom Cringan and Lillias Rennie Waugh emigrated to Canada in 1886.

 

1889 ..........

Elizabeth Waugh & George Robertson

Elizabeth Waugh and George Robertson (son of George Robertson, slate merchant,  and Margaret Johnston) were married on July 24, 1889, in St. George Edinburgh at the home of Lizzie's parents (12 Shandon Place). They had at least four children: Gretta (born about 1893); Margaret Johnston (1895 - Feb 14, 1913); Agnes Rennie (born about 1899); and George.

Agnes Rennie Robertson & Thomas Scott

 

1891 ..........

John Rogerson Waugh & Agnes Rennie

John Rogerson Waugh c 1885
John Rogerson Waugh c 1885
 
Agnes Rennie c 1885
Agnes Rennie c 1885
 

In the Edinburgh Post Office Directory for 1888 there is a listing for John Waugh, coal and lime agent; office, 12 Shandon Place.

1891 Scotland Census - St. George Burgh, Edinburgh
John Waugh & Agnes Rennie

Name: John R Waugh
Age: 58
Estimated birth year: abt 1833
Relationship: Head
Spouse's name : Agnes
Gender: Male
Where born: Dumfriesshire
Registration Number: 685A/2
Registration district: St George Burgh
Civil parish: Edinburgh St Cuthberts
County: Midlothian
Address: 12 Shandon Place
Occupation: Coal Merchant and Lime Agent
ED: 107
Household schedule number: 38
Line: 14
Roll: CSSCT1891_338
Household Members:
Name Age
John R Waugh 58
Agnes Waugh 60
Isabella Waugh 28
George Waugh 26

Source Citation: Parish: Edinburgh St Cuthberts; ED: 107; Page:  7; Line: 14; Roll CSSCT1891_338; Year: 1891. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1891 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.   Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1-409. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1891 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 5/6 April 1891. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

1891 Scotland Census - Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire
Mary Waugh & Gavin Scott
 

Name: Mary Scott
Age: 33
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1858
Relationship: Wife
Spouse's name : Gavin Scott
Gender: Female
Where born: Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire
Registration number: 649
Registration District: Lesmahagow
Civil Parish: Lesmahagow
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Hallhill
Occupation: Farmer Wife
ED: 12
Household Schedule Number: 22
Line: 17
Roll: CSSCT1891_312
Household Members:
Name Age
Gavin Scott 49
Mary Scott 33
Gavin Scott 14
John Scott 12
Thomas Scott 9
George Scott 8
Agnes Scott 6
James Scott 3
Alexander Scott 1
Archibald Rankin 21
James Barrie 76
Agnes Edgar 27
Margaret Peat 17

Source Citation: Parish: Lesmahagow; ED: 12; Page: 6; Line: 17; Roll: CSSCT1891_312. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1891 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1-409. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1891 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 5/6 April 1891. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1901 ..........

1901 Scotland Census - St. George Burgh, Edinburgh
John Waugh & Agnes Rennie

Name: John Waugh
Age: 68
Estimated birth year: abt 1833
Relationship: Head
Spouse's name : Agnes
Gender: Male
Where born: Innvergarth, Dumfriesshire
Registration Number: 685/1
Registration district: St George
Civil parish: Edinburgh St Michael
County: Midlothian
Address: 26 Shandon Place
Occupation: Coal Merchant
ED: 137
Household schedule number: 58
Line: 13
Roll: CSSCT1901_369
Household Members:
Name Age
John Waugh 68
Agnes Waugh 70
George Waugh 35
Isabella Waugh 41

Source Citation: Parish: Edinburgh St Michael; ED: 137; Page:  9; Line: 13; Roll CSSCT1901_369; Year: 1901. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1901 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.   Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1901 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 31 March/1 April 1901. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

Shandon Place (lower left), home of John Rogerson Waugh and Agnes Rennie during the 1901 Scotland Census
Shandon Place (lower left), home of John Rogerson Waugh and Agnes Rennie during the 1891 and 1901 Scotland Census

1901 Scotland Census - Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire
Mary Waugh & Gavin Scott
 
Name: Mary Scott
Age: 45
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1856
Relationship: Wife
Spouse's name : Gavin Scott
Gender: Female
Where born: Shotts, Lanarkshire
Registration number: 649/1
Registration District: Lesmahagow
Civil Parish: Lesmahagow
County: Lanarkshire
Address: Hallhill Farm
Occupation: Dairy Manager
ED: 12
Household Schedule Number: 25
Line: 2
Roll: CSSCT1901_341
Household Members:
Name Age
Gavin Scott 59
Mary Scott 45
Thomas Scott 19
Agnes Scott 16
James Scott 10
Alexander Scott 11
Janet Scott 9
Isabella Scott 7
Mary Scott 5
Lillias Scott 1
John Long 22
Fairlie Wallace 19
Catherine Gallocher 17
Lizzie Norris 14

Source Citation: Parish: Lesmahagow; ED: 12; Page: 8; Line: 2; Roll: CSSCT1901_341. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1901 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1901 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 31 March/1 April 1901. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1901 Canada Census - Ward Three, Toronto Centre, Ontario
Lilias Waugh & Alexander Thom Cringan
 

Name: Lillias W Cringan
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Married
Age: 40
Birth Day & Month: 24 Feb
Birth Year: 1861
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Immigration Year: 1885
Racial or Tribal Origin: Scotch (Scotish)
Nationality: Canadian
Religion: Presbyterian
Province: Ontario
District: Toronto (Centre) (City/Cité)
District Number: 116
Sub-District: Toronto (Centre) (City/Cité) Ward/Quartier No 3
Sub-District Number: A-35
Household Members:
Name Age
Alex T Cringan 40
Lillias W Cringan 40
Robert Cringan 17
John Cringan 15
Agnes Cringan 14
Jennie Cringan 12
Lillias Cringan 10
Bessie Cringan 8
Isabel Cringan 5
Annie Cringan 3
Helen Cringan 1
Abigial Clarkoon 43

Source Citation: Year: 1901;Census Place: Toronto (Centre) (City/Cité) Ward/Quartier No 3, Toronto (Centre) (City/Cité), Ontario. Page 14, Family No: 133. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1901. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2004. <http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1901/index-e.html>. Series RG31-C-1. Statistics Canada Fonds. Microfilm reels: T-6428 to T-6556. Images are reproduced with the permission of Library and Archives Canada. Description: The fourth census of Canada covers seven provinces - British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontairo, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec; two territories - the Yukon Territory and the Northwest Territories; and one district - the District of Keewatin. In 1901 the Northwest Territories was comprised of these seven districts: Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Franklin, Mackenzie, Saskatchewan, and Ungava. The census provides many details about individuals and families including: name, gender, age, relationship to head of household, marital status, birthplace, religion, and occupation.

 

Advertisement for Toronto Conservatory of Music, circa 1900, including ATC's ad; from collection of Beth Campbell
Advertisement for Toronto Conservatory of Music, circa 1900, including ATC's ad; from collection of Beth Campbell

 

 

1903 ..........

Professor John Waugh Scott

Professor John Waugh Scott received his MA from the University of Glasgow Scotland, in 1903, from which he graduated with first class honours in Mental Philosophy. He was appointed lecturer in moral philosophy at the University of Glasgow from 1905-1920. From 1920-1944, he held the position of Professor of Logic and Moral Philosophy at the University of Cardiff, Wales. In 1921, he was appointed the Mills lecturer in Philosophy at the University of California, California, USA. He received his LLD from the University of Glasgow in 1944. He contributed to the Encyclopaedia Britannica at various times during his career, and originated and conducted the Homecrofts experiment, Cheltenham, England from 1928-1956. He was appointed the Honorary Secretary of the National Homecroft Association from 1925 until 1943. He died in 1974. - from Archiveshub.ac.uk

 

1904 ..........

In the Edinburgh Post Office Directory for 1904 there is a listing for a John R. Waugh & Son, coal agents, 26 Shandon Pl; Telephone 1410 Central.

Waugh, Jn. R. & Son, coal agents, 26 Shandon Pl.; Telephone, 1410 Central; Slateford Rd.; Telephone, 1410A Cantral
Waugh, Jn. R. & Son, coal agents, 26 Shandon Pl.;
Telephone, 1410 Central; Slateford Rd.; Telephone, 1410A Central

Motor Cars advertisement from the Edinburgh Post Office Directory for 1904 - 1905
Motor Cars advertisement from the Edinburgh Post Office Directory for 1904 - 1905

 

1905 ..........

Agnes Scott (daughter of Mary Waugh and Gavin Scott) married James Glover (Medical Practitioner and son of Matthew Glover and Elizabeth Shancks) on July 4, 1905, in Hallhill, Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire.

 

1907 ..........

George Waugh Scott

George Waugh Scott graduated MB from the University (of Glasgow) in 1907 and MD in 1920 with his thesis A study of malaria and measures for its abatement amongst rubber estate workers in the Federated Malay States. Scott was medical officer in the Kamuning, Heawood, Changhat Salak, and other Estates Hospitals Association. He worked from 1908 to 1936 in Malaysia, where he specialised in Tropical Medicine and epidemiology, and set up a practice at Sungai Siput. Scott returned to the UK in 1936 and practiced at Malvern Link. In 1937 he was awarded an MBE ‘for services in the Federated Malay States'. During the Second World War, Scott organised the Malvern first-aid post in 1939 in the capacity as an unpaid volunteer like his staff. As well as being on the council and as president of the Malaya Branch of the British Medical Association, Scott was chairman-elect of the Worcester and Bromsgrove Branch and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine. - from University of Glasgow, International Story, George Waugh Scott, OBE

 

 

1908 ..........

John Rogerson Waugh

John Rogerson Waugh died on March 7, 1908, at 84 Marchmont Crescent, Edinburgh.

 

1909 ..........

George Waugh

George Waugh, Coal Merchant, Single, died of "general paralysis" in 1909, at the age of 43. His sister, Elizabeth Robertson, 84 Marchmont Crescent, was the informant.

Just as a little interesting tidbit - on George Waugh death certificate 1909, this is from wikipedia on archaic medical terms. He died of syphilis. "General paresis, also known as general paralysis of the insane or paralytic dementia, is a neuropsychiatric disorder affecting the brain and central nervous system, caused by syphilis infection. It was originally considered a psychiatric disorder when it was first scientifically identified around the nineteenth century, as the patient usually presented with psychotic symptoms of sudden and often dramatic onset." [Wikipedia]. - Glenda Waugh

 

 

1911 ..........

1911 Scotland Census - Hallhill Farm, Kirkfield Bank, Lesmahagow
Agnes Rennie, Mary Waugh & Gavin Scott


Gavin Stewart Scott (69), Mary Waugh Scott (53), Thomas Scott (29), Jean Scott (19), Mary Scott (15), Lillias Scott (11), Agnes Rennie (80)
See
original document

1911 Canada Census - 633 Church St., Ward Three, Toronto North, Ontario
Lillias Waugh & Alex Thom Cringan

Name: Lillias Cringan
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Married
Age: 50
Birth Date: Feb 1861
Birthplace: Scotland
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Spouse's Name: Alex T Cringan
Immigration Year: 1886
Tribal: Scotch (Scotish)
Province: Ontario
District: Toronto North
District Number: 126
Sub-District: Ward three
Sub-District Number: 84
Place of Habitation: 633 Church St
Household Members:
Name Age
Alex T Cringan 50
Lillias Cringan 50
John W Cringan 25
Agnes R Cringan 24
Janet C Cringan 22
Lillias W Cringan 20
Elizabeth R Cringan 18
Isabella M Cringan 16
Annie C Cringan 14
Helen M Cringan 12
Marie A Cringan 9
Catherine G Cringan 4
Abbie Clarkson 55

Source Citation: Year: 1911;Census Place: Ward three, Toronto North, Ontario. Page 5, Family No: 47. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1911 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.   Original data: Library and Archives Canada. Census of Canada, 1911. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, 2007. <http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1911/index-e.html>. Series RG31-C-1. Statistics Canada Fonds. Microfilm reels T-20326 to T-20460.
Images are reproduced with the permission of Library and Archives Canada. Description:
This fifth census of Canada covers the nine provinces and two territories of Canada as of 1911: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, the Yukon Territory, and the Northwest Territories. The census provides many details about individuals and families including: name, gender, age, birthplace, year of immigration, nationality, and origin. The names of those listed in the census are linked to actual images of the 1911 Census.

  Abbie Clarkson is the housekeeper

1911 Scotland Census - 84 Marchmont Crescent, Morningside, Edinburgh
Elizabeth Waugh

Elizabeth Robertson (48), Agnes (20) and Margaret (16)
Elizabeth Robertson (48), Agnes (20) and Margaret (16)
See
original document

Agnes is a "saleswoman".

1913 ..........

Margaret Johnton Robertson

Margaret Johnston Robertson (daughter of Elizabeth Waugh and George Robertson) died on Feb 14, 1913, in Edinburgh at the age of 18. She had epilepsy. Her address was given as 84 Marchmont Crescent, Edinburgh. This was the home of her parents, but her father was listed as "deceased" on her death certificate.

 

John Waugh Scott & Margaret Green

John Waugh Scott (son of Mary Waugh and Gavin Scott) married Margaret Green (daughter of Robert Green and Janet Gilles) on Dec 20, 1913, in Pollokshields, Glasgow. They had at least one child: Ruth (born May 25, 1919, died April 16, 2002).

Ruth Scott & Richard Richens

 

 

1914 ..........

First World War
1914 - 1918

 

1915 ..........
 
 
Agnes Rennie Robertson (daughter of George Robertson, deceased, and Elizabeth Waugh) married her cousin Thomas Scott (son of Gavin Scott and Mary Waugh) on Feb 23, 1915, at the Maitland Hotel, Shandwick Place, Edinburgh. They had at least one child: Gavin Stewart (born about 1915).
 

Agnes Rennie

Agnes Rennie died on Oct 18, 1915, in Hillend Gardens, Lesmahagow.

 

France

Evacuating the wounded to a Casualty Clearing Station, 1917
Evacuating the wounded to a Casualty Clearing Station, 1917

Alexander Scott

Immediately after graduating MB ChB in 1915 Sanny was off to training camp to prepare for service in the 79th Brigade of the 26th Division. He wrote of 'a great life', plentiful good food and a lot of drill. He also came to value his Scottish identity;

"It may be a remnant of the clan system but I assure you birth north of the Tweed is the best qualification I can find for a man down here."

Sanny's father thought he was pleased to have a status now. 'After having been a failure so long in gaining his diploma, and an abject dependent on the family so long on that account.' He was posted to France as Medical Officer of the 30th Brigade of the Royal Garrison Artillery in September. In the winter of 1915-1916 it was very cold in the field and his letters have more to say about the weather, and about French farming practices than about the war. As winter turned to spring he marvelled at the way the farms kept the rhythm of the seasons and described how a farmer ploughed around the holes recently made in his field by German guns. He was, however, frequently bored, and noted that, while there was a lot of action on some parts of the line, others were very quiet. "I am well and rather fed up," he wrote home. His spirits lifted when he had access to a motorbike and got around a bit. In May 1916 he was moved to Number 12 Clearing Station. Where "I have all home comforts and there are no shells." He moved on to another station, where it seems he was kept very busy.

In July 1916 he wrote to his father, describing how busy his casualty station (Number 36) was, but not in danger as some stations up the line were. Sanny wrote that though he hated shells, "I can never feel altogether satisfied back here. Somebody must be among it, and I am just the person who ought to be, young and without wife or children. Many doctors with infantry have both." In September Sanny was promoted to Captain. He wrote to his father; "Unfortunately in the RAMC this does not mean an increase of pay. All the difference it makes is a form of address."

Though his letters do not dwell on the sights and sounds of death, the tale of the war is there in his description of the fields. "The last bit of standing corn in sight was cut by two men with scythes in the rain this morning." Harvest time came, and Sanny found himself worrying about fields 'dropping ripe' with oats that couldn't be brought in. Sanny remained in good health, at least outwardly, though when he wrote that two surgeons, exhausted by the work being sent home, he noted that this would not happen to him since he had "an unfortunate habit of looking in the best of health."

His health was finally broken, however. In the summer of 1918 he wrote from a Red Cross hospital in Rouen, "I have had another relapse of this wretched (trench) fever and they are sending me home." He was sent to Manchester to recover. He found Manchester rather like Glasgow, but now in convalescence hated being cooped up most of the day in a "dirty, smoky, stinking Hospital."

Captain Alexander Scott survived the Great War. He married Jean Kinnear, a niece of his brother George's wife. He went out to Malaya to join George as a medical officer on the rubber and tin estates. He retired to general practice in Westray, Orkney in 1943, and finally to Jedburgh. He died in 1961.

- from Biography of Captain (Temporary Commission) Alexander Scott

See also: The Long, Long Trail - 26th Division
The Seige Batteries of the Royal Garrison Artillery
Royal Army Medical Corps Casualty Clearing Stations

 

1916 ..........

Battle of Messines


Royal Engineers mining crew in the process of tunneling under the Messines Ridge for the placement

James Scott

"The blowing up of a trench is one of the most terrifying operations in modern war."

James joined the Royal Engineers in October 1916. His mining engineering background was of great use to the Army. He would be a tunneller. This was a dangerous occupation, as James described it in his letters. Both sides were tunnelling, the object being to undermine and explode each other's trenches. Some of the tunnels were as much as 200 feet under. "The blowing up of a trench," he wrote, "is one of the most terrifying operations in modern war." In December he was commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant. In February, 1917, after extensive, often gruelling training, he was posted to France.

He was at Messines, attached to the 25th Division, when the Ridge was taken. The mines, he reported, were "an unqualified success." The Germans fled. One of his tasks after that was to find the enemy's dugouts, clear them of dead and wounded, and make them fit for our infantry to shelter in. It was a 'grim job', but in doing it he found secret papers and plans of great value. After Messines, James had a fortnight's rest 30 miles behind the lines, though still within sound of the guns.

It was short respite. Back to work in Belgium, he wrote of the awful conditions, where men suffered ill ventilated, cramped, wet, muddy conditions. It was July 1917 and he had been on horse-burying fatigue and was asking, "Is it worth risking casualties to men for the sake of burying horses?" Some of the horses up the line were 'very dead' and it was work that tired out your arms from holding your nose, and you "console yourself that there are worse things than stinks to walk through."

In some of his last letters to his father in July 1917, James wrote of a rest period after Messines, when the men were able to bathe in the lake and relax. He wrote of the prospect of going back 'home' up the line;

"It is curious how one's fear of and aversion to the line increases the longer one is out of it. I could well take a job in some quiet place in the back areas for the rest of the war. In the idleness of the last week I have been doing a lot of new thinking about the war. I fear it will not end as soon as I have all along assumed."

His father, Gavin, died just a month later, on 31st August 1917. James Scott, like his brother Sanny came home safe from the war. Married to Jean Dykes, he went off to become a mining engineer in Nairobi. He died in 1954.

- from Biography of 2nd Lieutenant James Scott

See also The Long, Long Trail, 25th Division

 

1917 ..........

Gavin Stewart Scott

Gavin Stewart Scott (husband of Mary Waugh) died on Aug 31, 1917, in Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire.

 

1919 ..........

Isabella Scott & John Lockhart Steele

Isabella Scott (daughter of Mary Waugh and Gavin Scott) married John Lockhart Steele (son of James Steele and Margaret Lockhart) on March 29, 1919, at Hillend Garden. Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire.

 

Mary Scott & Walter Forrest

Mary Scott (daughter of Mary Waugh & Gavin Scott) married Walter Forrest (son of Thomas Forrest and Mary Stewart) on Sept 22, 1922, at Hillend Garden, Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire.

 

Professor John Waugh Scott

John Waugh Scott was a Lecturer in Moral Philosophy, University of Glasgow, 1905-1920, Professor of Logic and Moral Philosophy, University College, Cardiff, 1920-1944 and Mills Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of California in Berkeley, 1921-1922.

Syndicalism and Philosophical Realism, by John Waugh Scott, 1919 (3.7 MB pdf)
Karl Marx on Value, by John Waugh Scott, 1920 (1.1 MB pdf)

Welsh Teacher Arrives to Take Berkeley Chair

Welsh Teacher Arrives to Take Berkeley Chair
Oakland Tribune, August 28, 1921

 

The Cheltenham Experiment

The Cheltenham Experiment
The Cheltenham Experiment
From Heavens Below: Utopian Experiemnts in England, 1560-1960, by W.H.G. Armytage

 

National Homecroft Association 1926-37

FOUNDER/LEADER: Prof. J.W.Scott

Public utility company inspired by working-class housing schemes in California. Built ten houses at Cheltenam with smallholdings attached. The families kept poultry & pigs and grew potatoes and fruit. It was hoped to replace individual holding with group homecrofts. As the depression worsened the scheme was used to teach groups of unemployed to grow food. A market was set up where the members could buy and sell their produce using their own local currency. The scheme had close links with Cardiff university from where student came to help. By 1934 The Times reported, in a favourable article, that light handlooms were in use.

GRID REF: Cheltenam
REF:Self-subsistence for the Unemployed. Prof. J.W.Scott / Utopian England

The Homecroft Scheme, J.W. Scott, Nov 6, 1926
The Homecroft Scheme, By Professor J. W. Scott, April 30, 1927

 

1925 ..........

Lillias Scott & Lindsay Steele

Lillias Scott (daughter of Mary Waugh and Gavin Scott) married Lindsay Steele (son of James Steele and Margaret Lockhart) on Sept 29, 1925, at Hillend Garden, Lesmahagow, Lanarkshire.

 

1926 ..........

Scott's Market, Burma

Bogyoke Aung San Market (formerly Scott's Market) is a major bazaar located in Pabedan township in central Yangon, Myanmar... Scott Market was built in 1926,[1] late in the British rule of Myanmar, and although it is commonly believed to be named after James George Scott, the British civil servant who introduced football to Myanmar, it is actually named after the Municipal Commissioner of the time, Mr. Gavin Scott.[2] After Burmese independence in 1948, it was renamed after Bogyoke (General) Aung San. A new wing of the market was added across Bogyoke Market Road in the 1990s. The market structure is listed on the Yangon City Heritage List. - Wikipedia

 

1927 ..........

Rangoon

Health and sanitary files in the National Archives of Myanmar helped illustrate the kinds of living conditions Rangoon’s poorest communities faced. A 1927 report on the Public Health of Rangoon provided particularly interesting evidence. Gavin Scott, the Municipal Commissioner Rangoon, estimated there were 250,000 ‘coolies’ in the city most of the year making up ‘more than half the population.’1 In providing this estimate of casual laborers, Scott’s testimony points to the large numbers of Rangoon residents living in poverty. When the Rangoon Social Services League offered testimony before the committee writing the 1927 report, they said that ‘the filth is indescribable’ in tenement buildings where ‘in every case the room visited was found to be overcrowded.’2 Given that tenement buildings provided some of the cheapest housing outside of Rangoon’s informal settlements, it becomes clear that a majority of Rangoon’s residents faced in extremely poor living conditions. Besides only illustrating Rangoon’s poor living conditions, the health and sanitary files also provide a point of comparison from which living conditions across the region – in cities like Bombay, Hong Kong and Singapore – can be compared. - from Slums, Squatters and Urban Redevelopment Schemes in Rangoon, 1894-1960, by Michael Sugarman, University of Cambridge

 

1928 ..........

Alexander Scott & Jean Rae Kinnear

Alexander Scott (son of Mary Waugh and Gavin Scott) married Jean Rae Kinnear (daughter of George Henderson Kinnear) and Margaret Guthrie) on June 29, 1928, in Dalment, West Lothian.

 

Alexander Thom Cringan and Lillias Waugh arrived into Glasgow from Montreal aboard the Canadian Pacific Steamship Minnedosa on Aug 16, 1928. Their proposed address in the UK was c/o Wm. Russell, Maplehurst, Carluke, Scotland.

 
1929 ..........
 
Lillias Rennie Waugh

Lillias Rennie Waugh Cringan died on May 10, 1929, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and is buried in the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto.

Lillias Waugh, Lanarkshire Scotland, Feb 24th 1861
Lillias Waugh, Lanarkshire Scotland, Feb 24th 1861
Toronto May 10th, 1929

 
1930 ..........

Mr. Gavin Scott, Rangoon Official Leaves for Home

Mr. Gavin Scott, Rangoon Official Leaves for Home
The Strait Times, May 1, 1930
National Library Singapore

 
1932 ..........

Thomas Scott

Thomas Scott, farmer (son of Mary Waugh and Gavin Scott and husband of Agnes Rennie Robertson) died on April 6, 1932, in Dennistoun, Glasgow at the age of 51. The informant was Gavin Scott, brother, and his address was given as Hall Hill, Crossford, Carluke.

 

 
1937 ..........
 
Mary Waugh

Mary Waugh (widower of Gavin Stewart Scott and daughter of John Rogerson Waugh and Agnes Rennie) died on March 31, 1937, in Hillend Gardens, Lesmahagow.

 

George Waugh Scott

As well as pioneering work in the field of engineering, University alumni have also pioneered Malaria research in Malaysia, beginning with Sir Malcolm Watson (1873–1955). Having graduated MB CM in 1895, Watson joined the Malayan Medical Service in 1900, submitting his MD thesis on The effect of drainage on malaria in 1903, and became the pioneer of malarial control in Malaya (Peninsular Malaysia), making Malaysia’s anti-malaria programme one of the world’s oldest. Watson was followed in his research by George Waugh Scott (1883–1944), MB 1907 and MD 1920, whose work, research and thesis, ‘A study of malaria and measures for its abatement amongst rubber estate workers in the Federated Malay States’, saw him awarded an MBE in 1937 ‘for services in the Federated Malay States’; and Robert B Wallace, MD 1967, continued with this area of research with his thesis on ‘Malaria Control in Hilly Country in Malay’. - from University of Glasgow, International Story, Malaysia

 
 
1944 ..........

Isabella Waugh

Isabella Waugh died on Aug 23, 1944, at 70 Townhead St., Strathaven, Avondale and Glassford, Lanarkshire. The informant was J.W. Scott, Nephew, University College, Cardiff.

1945 ..........

Elizabeth Waugh

Elizabeth Waugh Robertson, Widow of George Robertson, Marine Engineer, died on Dec 3, 1945, at 12 Melville Terrace, Edinburgh, at the age of 83.

 
1955 ..........

James Scott


Kenya Gazette, 17 May 1955

 

2002 ..........

Ruth Scott

Mrs Ruth Richens died suddenly aged 82 at her home in Cambridge on April 16th this year. At the SPNSociety AGM in Dunfermline in May, Simon Taylor paid a short tribute to her, a summary of which is printed below.

Ruth Richens nee Scott was among the first members of the SPN Society and one of the most loyal attenders at the conferences, despite the fact that she lived in Cambridge. She showed the same loyalty to Project Pont, attending every one of its annual conferences during the four years of its existence. , I had the privilege of working with her on a paper given at the Project Pont Conference in New Lanark in April 2000 entitled 'Pont and Place-Names of Lesmahagow' using her meticulously collected and collated material from the sometimes almost illegible Pont manuscript map of Lanarkshire.

My first encounter with Ruth's work was her excellent 'Ancient land divisions in the parish of Lesmahagow', Scottish Geographical Magazine 108 (no.3), 184-189 (1992), in which she used 12th and 13th century charters of Kelso Abbey to recreate early land-units in that parish. Her love of Lanarkshire, especially of Lesmahagow, ran deep, since her father's family hailed from there, and she often visited there in her youth. Her great act of family homage was her edition of the letters of her grandfather, Gavin Scott, written between 1911 and 1917 to Gavin Scott's son George, a medical officer in Malaya. These she published in six books in the 1980s (see Scottish Place-Name News 5 (Autumn 1998), p.9). Ruth, in her work on Lesmahagow, as well as on family history, received impressive support from various family members, especially from her cousin Mrs Lilias MacDonald, North Queensferry, who was present at the Dunfermline conference, and from Mrs MacDonald's husband Kinnear MacDonald, who has produced a digitised database of much of Ruth's Pont material, including a successful attempt at presenting Pont's river system in an electronic format.

Latterly Ruth had been working on the Hamilton Estate Rental of 1637, which details all the property held by the Hamiltons throughout Lanarkshire and beyond. She was applying her usual meticulous care on this work, as well as bringing to bear on it her formidable knowledge of Lanarkshire topography and toponymy.

The greatest tribute that can be paid to Ruth is to ensure that her work is continued, and published, and I hope that the SPN Society will be actively involved in such a tribute.

 

Lillias Rennie Waugh & Alexander Thom Cringan

Robert Cringan (born March 5, 1821. in New Monkland) married Janet Thom (born June 9, 1826) on Oct 1, 1841, in New Monkland, Lanarkshire Scotland. They had at least five children: Janet (born Oct 15, 1842); Elizabeth (born Oct 14, 1849); Robert (born Nov 14, 1851); Margaret (born Feb 25, 1854); Jane (born about 1858); and Alexander Thom (born Oct 13, 1860).

The Thom Side of the Family

Janet Thom's parents were Alexander Thom and Janet Jack. They were married on Jan 1, 1821, in New Monkland and had at least six children: George (born Nov 11, 1821); Margaret (born Jan 25, 1824); Janet (born June 9, 1826, in Carluke); Jane and William (twins born May 24, 1829); and Alexander (born May 13, 1832); all except Janet in New Monkland.

Alexander Thom's parents were George Thom and Margaret Bryson and they had at least five children: James (born April 29, 1798); Alexander (born about 1799); George (born June 9, 1805); Isobel (born July 26, 1807) and Robert (born Dec 10, 1809), all in New Monkland. - Scotland's people

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In Memory of Alex Cringan

The following information and photos have been provided courtesy of Alex Cringan (grandson of Lillias Rennie Waugh):

Trimble, Dorothy Irene Robertson, 1990. THE HERITAGE OF THE PAST: Settlers: Alexander Thom Cringan and Lillias Rennie Waugh. Published privately, Toronto, ON., Canada

Lillias Rennie Waugh (1861-1929), the third of five children of John Waugh (1833-1908) and Agnes Rennie (1836-aft1908), was born in Cambusnethan, Lanarkshire, Scotland, February 24, 1861. She married Alexander Thom Cringan (1860-1931) on August 18, 1882. They had 11 children, two sons born in Scotland, and nine daughters born in Canada. Lillias and Alex and their two sons emigrated from Scotland to Canada in 1886.

Lillias Rennie Waugh Cringan and Alexander Thom Cringan camping
Lillias Rennie Waugh Cringan and Alexander Thom Cringan camping with their first three children in the summer of 1887; Robert, standing, John seated on the ground, and Rennie in arms; photo taken in either Niagara Falls or Balmy Beach; given to Alex Cringan by Dorothy Trimble.

Lillias Rennie Waugh Cringan has been described by members of her family as intelligent, accepting, compassionate and patient. Although very busy with her eleven children and home, she had many interests and a deep concern for others. Lillias was concerned about pre-school education. Her daughter, Marie Taylor, recalls when she was four years old going with her mother every Thursday to the home of Mrs. James L. Hughes where several ladies experimented with various teaching methods such as Montessori and Proeblian. Lillias was concerned about the rights of women. As was the custom, Lillias gave calling cards to friends which announced the days she would be "At home" to receive visitors. Over tea they discussed the issues of the day and the rights of women. She campaigned for Margaret Patterson who became the first Magistrate of Women's Court in Toronto. She belonged to a support group for the Yorkville Home for Unmarried Mothers and frequently employed their girls as domestics. She was a member of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lillias did not want anyone thinking that she was anxious to marry off her nine daughters. When in their teens only two of the girls were allowed to attend the same party. When young gentleman called for the girls to take them to parties or concerts Lillias would seldom appear in case they should think that they were being looked over as prospective husbands. Some of Lillias wise sayings and practices have been carried down through the generations. "The back is made for the burden rather than the burden for the back" was a favourite saying. "One cuts and the other chooses" was a rule handed down to our children when food such as an apple or a piece of cake was to be shared. "Never let the sun go down on your wrath" was another guideline. "Better that their bones be broken than their spirit" was an adage by which the Cringan children were brought up and which Rennie perpetuated in bringing up Bill and Cringan.

Alexander Thom Cringan visited Canada in 1885-86 (on the Circassia, g in New York Oct. 19, 1885), then returned to Britain where he completed his Licentiate at Curwen's Tonic Sol-Fa College in London. In 1887 A.T. and Lillias Waugh with sons Robert Cringan and John Cringan came to Canada in a ship powered by both sails and engine. Near Newfoundland the rudder of the ship broke and the ship foundered for six weeks before they were rescued. Six weeks after they arrived in Toronto Agnes Rennie Cringan was born.

The Toronto Directory lists the addresses of Alexander Thom Cringan as follows:
1887 - 168 Robert Street,
1888 354 Huron Street,
1890-92 - 23 Avenue Road,
1893 - 34 Sussex Street,
1898 - 633 Church Street,
1920's - 1262 Broadview Avenue, East York.

Biographical Note from TORONTO ART AND MUSIC (1891):

The leader of the choir of the Central Presbyterian Church, Mr. Alexander T. Cringan, was born at Carluke, Lanarkshire, Scotland, October 13th, 1860. Receiving his early training at the local Grammar School, he got his musical education at the Tonic Sol Fa College, London, Eng., where he took the special subjects of harmony and voice training and the art of teaching music. Mr. Cringan is a graduate and licentiate of the Tonic Sol Fa College [2] , having the degree of G.L.T.S.C. In 1887 he was appointed Superintendent of Music for the Toronto Public Schools. He was conductor of the Tonic Sol Fa Society during 1886-7. Since 1887 he has been identified with the Scottish Select Choir and the Summer School of Music of the American Vocal Music Association. Mr. Cringan is the author of the Canadian Music Course and Teachers' Handbook. He conducted with marked ability the school children's concert in the Pavilion Music Hall, March 21st, 1890, and the Carnival Concert in the Crystal Palace in the same year. Since 1887 he has been choirmaster at the Central Presbyterian Church.

Alex Cringan
Alex Cringan
Univ. of Toronto Graduation, 1899

The Cringan Family c 1904
The Cringan Family c 1904

Lillias Rennie Waugh
Lillias Rennie Waugh

 

MUSIC WORLD BEREAVED IN DEATH OF A. T. CRINGAN
Veteran Teacher Was Known to Toronto for 45 Years
YOUTHFUL SPIRIT
By Augustus Bridle (From Toronto Daily Star) (1931)

Music to him was never old. Enthusiasm was never dim. Interest never flagged. He loved as much to sing at the age of 70 as he did at 25. The art of music as a language remained to him as tremendous as it had been when, in 1885, he came to Toronto as the first chief of music in the public schools.

Surviving are a brother, Robert, in Los Angeles, California; a son, John W., Toronto; eight married daughters, Mrs. William C. McIntyre, Ogdensburg, N. Y.; Mrs. James W. Gardner, Hamilton; Mrs. Rhoderick (sic) Macdonald, Windsor; Mrs. Ewen S. Campbell, Detroit, and Mrs. R. C. Trimble, Mrs. Lloyd Morrow, Mrs. Walter S. Taylor, and Mrs. Joseph Atkinson Jr., all of Toronto. Another daughter died eight years ago to-day.

The body will be In Rosedale Presbyterian church, Huntley and South Drive, for half an hour on Tuesday afternoon previous to the service which is to take place at three o'clock. A private service will be held at 1.15 o'clock in the home of Mrs. Trimble on Inglewood Drive.

Recall First Appearance

Thousands of fathers and mothers all over Canada recall the days when the young Scot from Edinburgh with the tenor voice, the fine Scottish accent and the glowing evangelism in a new cause stood before them in the classroom. His message to them was the alluring tone relations between the five whole tones and two semitones in the diatonic scale. With a wooden pointer he traced out on the modulator the outlines of a melody - sometimes two pointers at once, one for the "air," the other for the second part in harmony. He showed them by ear and eye the almost personal characteristics of these tones.

Because this was news, Cringan liked it. To hear children sing was always, to him, one more proof of heaven upon earth. To help them discover tone, pitch, melody, simple harmony, was in him a sensation of the divine element in man.

Years ago a speaker on art told how once upon a time he had tried to teach seven races of children unable to speak English in a western school the colors of tones in the scale by using seven colored cardboard notes to imitate the rainbow.

"I was glad to hear you make that point," said Cringan with a rare Scottish twinkle. "But it was not you that discovered it. Neither did I. But I read it years ago in a magazine."

Not much that was new in singing ever escaped this master of teaching children to sing, who had reared ten children of his own in a home whose constant atmosphere was the joy of music.

Had Perennial Optimism

It is almost perfunctory to say that A. T. Cringan was one of the few musicians left in Canada of the older nineteenth century school besides Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Blight, E. W. Schuch and Edgar Doward. But when musicians older than himself might recall the good old days of oratorio and Torrington and Adelina Patti, he could always take a grander joy in the musical joys of the present and the future. I have met many musicians; never one of finer perennial optimism than A. T. Cringan.

He was born and educated in Lanarkshire, married in Edinburgh, and took his earliest music training in the Tonic Sol-Fa college in London. He came to Canada in 1885; returned to Edinburgh in 1886 to finish a college course; became choirmaster first of Central Presbyterian church on the corner of what is now Bay St. and Grosvenor St. - torn down when Bay St. was extended and widened. In 1897 he became choirmaster of Cooke's church, four years after it was dedicated. He was one of the charter members of the Mendolssohn choir in 1894, when A. S. Vogt conducted part-songs and motets in Massey Hall with a chorus of less than 100.

For several years after his retirement from the directorship of music in public schools he had a vocal studio at the Toronto Conservatory, while he continued to teach music to classes in the Toronto normal and model schools.

In his later years he became inspector of music for Provincial normal and model schools and remained in that capacity until his death.

Cringan was not merely a musical educator; he was a lifelong apostle. He did for School music in Toronto very much what Torrington did for church music and oratorio. He was a pioneer. Before he came here, music in schools was a Cinderella of the curriculum. It was his job to liberate it by scholarly enthusiasm.

Won Recognition

He was one of the few musicians of the last decade of the 19th century to gain the degree of Mus. Bac. in the University of Toronto.

He was not content to be an evangel of the Tonic Sol-Fa; he would demonstrate that a man who believed in this rather revolutionary system for schools was as competent to pass technical and academic tests as any of those who believed there

was nothing good in music outside the treble and bass clef. As one result of this he became one of the first presidents of the Toronto Clef Club at a time when perhaps no other member of the club had any use for Tonic Sol-Fa at all.

He believed mind and soul in a system which had its origin in England and by which, to this day, even in Toronto, many Britishers sing; the system which got its fundamentals, not in arbitrary lines and space and ABC as on the keyboard, but in the scale itself, that could be shifted up and down on the lines and spaces a,s a man climbs a ladder.

In the '60's and '70's this Tonic Solfa notation based in its scale upon an old Italian do-re-mi or solfeggi system, became all the rage in English schools. Children learned to sing at sight by means of it, much more easily than by the use of notes on lines with dots and tails and what not.

It was Cringan's self-imposed and at first unpopular task to teach this system. He believed in it because he had learned by it. He succeeded in teaching children to become interested, not in a mechanical art of reading by the mere sense of pitch from the staff but to be conscious of the tones in the scale itself; the family of five tones and two semitones each related to the other by a sort of mystic bond.

For years all the choruses that Cringan trained for school concerts sang from Curwen's Tonic Sol-Fa sheets. Later he adopted a modified system, using the Tonic Sol-fa for a scale only and teaching classes to sing to the staff notation by means of the movable Doh. But he never gave up his early belief that scale is the great thing, that the ear is mare fundamental in music than the eye. The system taught in junior classes to-day, not only in Toronto but all over Ontario is essentially what Cringan taught when he came here in 1886.

Trained Chorus for Royal Visit

When Massey Hall was opened in 1894 one of the programs was taken by a chorus of 700 children trained and conducted by Cringan. When the present King and Queen visited Toronto in 1902 he was asked as a compliment to conduct the great chorus of 6,000 children who sang in honor of the visit. He was then teaching music in model and normal schools and had passed his Mus. Bac. Tor.

Nearly twenty years ago I was shown a copy of the Ontario archaeological report of which one of the most interesting chapters was a record of how A. T. Cringan in 1897 had anticipated all the present-day Indian folksong collectors in Canada in transcribing by ear a number of Indian melodies, a thing never before done in Canada.

Patiently he listened to an Indian chief from the Munceytown reservation sing the old Five Nations melodies; and he set them down. In this baffling melodic feat he found the enormous value of the ear training he had received in the Tonic Sol-Fa. It made no difference exactly on what pitch the chief had his Doh, the melody was taken down as parts of the scale. making with students at the summer school which he regularly conducted at the University Training school here. These students were all teachers of music. To him they were all youths like himself, gloriously venturing upon fresh musical discoveries in an age when most of the marvels of music are in mechanism.

He made an entire phonograph collection of Indian melodies which he transcribed in the report [4]; and for years later his reports covering a total of 100 Iroquois melodies, formed a valuable item in the annual book issued by David Boyle the Ontario archaeologist.

Mr. Cringan delivered a series of lectures on this subject in Canada and Great Britain, and he also wrote a series of practical works on the teaching of music. He was always ready to prove a point. He loved discussion rather than argument. He was always learning from experience and from the successes of other people.

Aided Mendelssohn Choir

To the Mendelssohn Choir he devoted several years of his leisure hours. He seldom missed a rehearsal. In the great works of the choir he found direct inspiration and was one of the most emphatic in declaring that here was a new gospel of choral music. After lessons at the Conservatory he used often to walk up with Vogt through Queen's Park, discussing the works of the choir.

"I think Brahms must have been a tenor singer," he said once, discussing the Brahms Requiem. "He makes the tenor parts of his works so beautiful."

Music to him was life. For it he never felt that he was sacrificing anything. With his courage, zeal, mental ability and tireless industry he might have been much more materially successful in a business. But he was born to teach, to sing, to be an evangel. In days when the material rewards of music were low he brought up a family to all of whom he gave a good education, and, what was more precious, the example of a character who always saw more good than evil in others, was always ready to devote himself to a cause, remained a consistent member of the church and was always ready to help some one less experienced than himself.

In music he did a pioneer work in Canada second only to that of Torrington and Vogt. When Torrington was king of music here, Mr. Cringan was one of his ablest helpers. He taught many a school choir patriotic pieces for Torrington to conduct. When Vogt took the more modern leadership, he became a still greater enthusiast for the new works.

The death of his elder son, one of Canada's most promising violinists, was a severe blow to one who loved both music and family so deeply. The death of Mrs. Cringan last year removed one who had been much more than a good mother. The Cringan home was always a place of gladness in which music had a wonderful part. In that home, or in the school, in the choir loft, in the chorus, in the studio, Alexander T. Cringan was always a man of extraordinary warmth of personality, whom it was a pleasure to meet because he was not only a great enthusiast, a merry soul and a real gentleman, but also had the genuine qualities of a vastly original character. The foregoing is from Trimble's article on ATC in Trimble (1990).

ALEXANDER THOM CRINGAN

A kindly gentleman has left us, and though our hearts are sore because he has gone, yet was there no sorrow in his leaving, for he was glad to be away to be with one whom he missed sorely. He loved his music, he loved his garden with its flowers, his pipe and his game of curling, but best of all he loved the gentle little woman whom he called Mother - she who had stood by his side through all the years, the mother of his children and in very surety his partner.

He was too good a soldier to show his grief over being left behind when she went on, but his heart is happy now, because he is with her. His son and his daughters have the happy memory of a good father and a Christian gentleman, and we in Rotary the knowledge that Rotary is poorer because he has gone, but richer because of the imprint his life left on the history of our Club. Alex. Cringan carried in his life all those attributes of a good Rotarian and the example he left us will be ever an inspiration to his fellow-members that they should pattern their lives likewise.

 
2012 ..........

Alex Thom Cringan and his wife June
Alex & June Cringan, April, 2010, Fort Collins, Colorado

CRINGAN, Alexander T. - Age 86, of Fort Collins, CO died October 30, 2012. He is survived by his wife June, his sister Mary Janes of Toronto; his two sons Alexander C. of Hope, BC and Douglas (Gayle) of Wellington, CO; and granddaughters Heather of North Grafton, MA, Kelly of Wellington, CO, and twins Allison and Megan of San Tan Valley, AZ. Alex will be remembered by his family and friends for his smile, his wealth of knowledge and his kind disposition. Memorial contributions may be made to the Foothills Unitarian Church Endowment Fund, 1815 Yorktown Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80526, or to the Fort Collins Audubon Society, PO Box 271968, Fort Collins, CO 80527-1968. - Published in the Toronto Star from November 10 to November 11, 2012

Read his obituary from the Coloradoan

 

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