The Waugh Family
An historical and photographic perspective

The Waugh's of Canonbie and Ewes

While researching the Waugh Family we originally came to the conclusion (based on the best available "evidence" during our early work) that the Robert Waugh born in Ewes in 1784 was one of our direct ancestors. After many years and subsequent research new information came to light that led us to believe differently and that "our" Robert Waugh was the Robert Waugh born in Lochmaben in about 1784. We have left this information online in the event anyone is researching the Waughs of Ewes...

Index of Official Parish Registries and Statutory Registries for Births, Marriages and Deaths
John Waugh & Jean Elliot | William Waugh & Janet Nicol

Evia et Escia Scotis, Evsdail et Eskdail / Auct. Timotheo Pont, I. Blaeu excud.
Evia et Escia Scotis, Evsdail et Eskdail / Auct. Timotheo Pont, I. Blaeu, 1654.

John Waugh &

Jean Elliot

Born: About 1710

Born: July 15, 1716

Place: ?

Place: Canonbie

Married  ?
Place: ?
Died: ?

Died: ?

Place: ?

Place: ?

Staplegordon Parish united with Wauchope Parish in 1703 to form Langholm Parish.

John Waugh married Jean Elliot(t) (born July 15, 1716), in Canonbie, Liddesdale, Scotland. At that time Liddesdale was part of Roxburghshire. John Waugh may have been born Jan 1, 1701, in Canonbie, and his parents may have been David Wauch and Jean Lamb.

Jean Elliotts parents were Robert Elliot (born about 1689 in Canonbie) and Blenche Graham (born about 1693 in Canonbie). Jean's brother John Elliot was born (or christened) Jan 3, 1715, in Canonbie. The Elliots were (and still are) long-time residents of Arkleton in the Ewes Valley.

The Elliot side of the Family

"The Elliots of Ewesdale were of the Redheuch branch and were ancient allies of the Armstrongs. 'The Elliots and Armstrongs did convene, They were a gallant companie,' etc. as the ballad has it. In 1578 both upper and nether Fiddleton were occupied by an Elliot as “Will o’ Fiddleton.” At the same time one Ringan - sometimes called Ninian - occupied Ewes Doors, and it indicates a sense of humour among them that he was known as “Ringan the Porter.”

We also get Archie Elliot, son to Ringan’s Will, the Proter and Hobbe of Glenvorane was an Elliot. In these descriptions Ewes Doors and Glenvorane seem to refer to the same holding or it was perhaps that Ewes Doors was the “friendly tenant” of Glenvorane, who was a holder of much importance. Everyone has heard of the famous fight between the Elliots and the Scotts in 1566. There had long been a feud between the two clans. The Elliots, led apparently by the Laird of Braidlie, to the number of 400 it is said, concentrated on Ewes Doors as the best strategical position. The battle was a sharp one and many of the Scotts were slain The Armstrongs seem to have occupied Arkleton up to about 1610. By a charter dated 13th June, 1611, the King granted the ten pound lands of Arkilton to William Elliot o£ Fallineske, and I think I am correct in saying that they have remained in the possession of that family since that date, though I believe it is also said that the Arkleton lands came to the Elliots by purchase from the Armstrongs." - from The Ewes Valley by Brenda Morrison and R. Bruce McCartney

John Waugh & Jean Elliot

John Waugh and Jean Elliot had at least two children: Margaret (born May 11, 1735, in Canonbie) and William (born April 30, 1741, in Canonbie).

Children Born Place Died Place
Margaret May 11, 1735 Canonbie Parish    
WILLIAM April 30, 1741 Canonbie Parish after 1793  

1745 Map of Eusdale and Liddesdale showing Kannaby (Canonbie), Wachopp, Langhoome and Kirktoun (Ewes?)
1745 Map of Eusdale and Liddesdale showing Kannaby (Canonbie),
Wachopp, Langhoome, Kirktoun (Ewes), Glendoun, and Mekildale

William Waugh &

Janet Nichol

Born: April 30, 1741

Born: June 22, 1756

Place: Canonbie

Place: Cleughfoot, Langholm or Staplegordon

Married  May 4, 1774
Place: Langholm, Dumfriesshire
Died: after 1800

Died: after 1800

Place: ?

Place: ?

Janet Nichol's parents were Thomas Nichol (living in Cleughfoot near Langholm at the time of Janet's birth) and Elizabeth Rae (no additional information). Janet had at least one sister (Helen born Sept 7, 1759, in Milnbankhead, Langholm or Staplegordon). Thomas Nichol's parents may have been Edward Nicol and Marian Murray in Whitshields just outside Langholm (to the northeast) and Thomas may have been baptized March 2, 1735.

William Roy Military Survey of Scotland 1747-55
William Roy Military Survey of Scotland 1747-55
Showing Cleugh Foot in Wachope Dale a short distance from Langholm

RCAHMS Site Record for St. Bride's Chapel, Cleuchfoot
RCAHMS Site Record for Cleuchfoot Cottages

RCAHMS Site Record for Staplegordon, Old Parish Church Archaeology Notes

William Waugh married Janet Nichol (born June 22, 1756, in Staplegordon / Langholm, Canonbie) "third daughter to Thomas Nicol". At the time of their marriage on May 4, 1774, William's occupation was listed as sheppard at Unthank of Ewes and Thomas Nichol's usual residence was Milnbankhead.

William Waugh and Janet Nichol had seven children: William (born Sept 24, 1775), Thomas (born Oct 4, 1779, in Ewes), John (born Aug 6, 1781, in Ewes), Robert (born Aug 9, 1784, in Ewes), Andrew (born Oct 15, 1786, in Ewes), James (born July 5, 1789, in Ewes), and David (born May 2, 1793, in Ewes).

Children Born Place Died Place
William Sept 24, 1775 Bankend of Unthank, Ewes, Dumfriesshire    
Thomas Oct 4, 1779 Ewes, Dumfriesshire    
John Aug 6, 1781 Ewes, Dumfriesshire    
ROBERT Aug 9, 1784 Unthank, Ewes, Dumfriesshire    
Andrew Oct 15, 1786 Unthank, Ewes, Dumfriesshire    
James July 5, 1789 Burnside, Ewes, Dumfriesshire    
David March 17, 1793 Kirkstyle, Ewes, Dumfriesshire    
Margaret June 23, 1800 Kirkstyle, Ewes, Dumfriesshire    

Kirkstile is another name for Ewes Kirk

RCAHMS Site Record for Unthank Parish Church

The southern half of the disused churchyard has numerous 18th and 19 century headstones and a large mausoleum which overlies the east end of the church. The northern half is now featureless. - RCAHMS Site Record

The Edinburgh to Carlisle road by Hawick and Langholm runs along the banks of the Ewes. It was planned by a Mr Pulteney and built in 1765. Another public road leads east to Liddesdale, and another allows access to Dumfries and Moffat. - Old Statistical Account, 1793

Perched atop Briery Shaw Hill (above Ewes Kirk and to the west of Arkleton) is a pre-Roman British  Hill Fort dating back more than 2,000 years. See Brieryshaw Hill Archaeology Notes.

Map showing portion of Road from Edinburgh to Carlisle (heading south through the Ewes Valley), 1775
Map showing portion of Road from Edinburgh to Carlisle (heading south through the Ewes Valley), 1775
from Mosspeeble to Wachope showing Dr. Elliot's, Ewes Kirk, Armstron Esq., and Langholm Castle

Map showing portion of Road from Edinburgh to Carlisle through the Ewes Valley, 1775
Map showing portion of Road from Edinburgh to Carlisle (heading south through the Ewes Valley), 1775
showing the Mosspaul Inn and Fiddleton Toll where Robert Waugh would later be the tollkeeper
Note the Chapel Ruins (at Unthank) just south of Fiddleton Toll
The Mosspaul Inn is still in existence
Read more about the Mosspaul Inn from Electric Scotland

Not far from Mosspaul Inn (down the pass and into the Teviot Valley) is the Teviothead Old Graveyard.

RCAHMS Site Record for Teviothead Old Graveyard

Waugh's and Nichol's were buried in the graveyard in the late 1600s. It was also near here that Border Reiver Johnnie Armstrong of Gilnockie Tower and his 50 men were hung by King James V (of Scotland) in 1531.

"We saw a single stone house a long way before us, which we conjectured to be, as it proved, Moss Paul, the inn where we were to wait. The scene, with this single dwelling, was melancholy and wild, but not dreary, though there was no tree nor shrub; the small streamlet glittered, the hills were populous with sheep; but the gentle bending of the valley, and the correspondent softness in the forms of the hills, were of themselves enough to delight the eye. At Moss Paul we fed our horse; — several travellers were drinking whisky. We neither ate nor drank, for we had, with our usual foresight and frugality in travelling, saved the cheese-cakes and sandwiches which had been given us by our countrywoman at Jedburgh the day before. After Moss Paul, we ascended considerably, then went down other reaches of the valley, much less interesting, stony and barren. The country afterwards not peculiar, I should think, for I scarcely remember it. Arrived at Langholm at about five o'clock. The town, as we approached, from a hill, looked very pretty, the houses being roofed with blue slates, and standing close to the river Esk, here a large river, that scattered its waters wide over a stony channel. The inn neat and comfortable — exceedingly clean: I could hardly believe we were still in Scotland." - from Recollections of a Tour Made in Scotland A.D. 1803, by Dorothy Wordsworth while traveling with her brother (and poet) William Wordsworth.

THE FIRST LANDLORD (of Mosspaul Inn)

Mosspaul Inn at one time was said to be little more than a "butt-and-ben," and continued to be so till about the beginning of the 19th century. The first landlord of whom any record can be traced was Thomas Gray, whose name appeared in a list, in 1803, of those who were prepared to defend their country against the threatened French invasion. He was a member of the 1st Battalion of the Roxburghshire Volunteers, and rode to Hawick along with Major Robert Elliot of Arkleton on the night of the False Alarm, the evening of the 31st January, 1804, when the beacon fires on the Border hills flashed the erroneous intelligence that the French had landed.

Gray and James Ruickbie, the keeper of the Toll Bar at Colterscleugh, were congenial friends, and being separated by only a few miles, would no doubt have many social and convivial evenings together in their respective houses, for in those days practically all the Toll Bars sold liquor. Ruickbie was a noted Border poet, and believed to have been the first local bard to have published a volume of his verses. He is understood to have issued three of four editions, one of which was printed by Robert Armstrong in Hawick in 1815, the year of the battle of Waterloo.

From http://www.electricscotland.com/history/articles/mosspaul.htm

Map of the Ewes Valley, 1804
Map showing the Ewes Valley, 1804

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Which Robert Waugh?

Another Robert Waugh?...
There was also a Robert Waugh (in Cumberland?) and Jane Bell (at Waterbeck) who had an "illigitimate" daughter Margaret born April 11, 1837. Waterbeck is only 3 miles North of Donkins and 3 miles South of Setthorn.

Another Robert Waugh?...
A Robert Waugh (born c. 1786) later married Mary Irvine (born in Kirkpatrick-Fleming around 1817) and moved (back?) to Ewes where he worked as a tollkeeper on the Edinburgh to Carlisle road that went through the Ewes Valley. Robert and Mary had at least three children: William (born
March 22, 1847, "illegitimate" in Middlebie Parish), Janet (born April 7, 1849, in Setthorns, Middlebie) and Mary Irvine (born April 26, 1851, in Setthorns, Middlebie). Setthorns is located just North of Kirkleton and about 7 miles North of Donkins (where George Waugh was living) and only 4 miles East of Lairdholme (where John Rogerson Waugh was born in 1833). William's OPR Birth indicates that Robert was from "Castletown" (where he had been living with his brother Thomas in Roxburghshire in the 1841 Census).


Waugh, Robert, Castletown, and Mary Irvine Setthorns had a son born on the 22nd March, 1847,
and baptized by the Rev. R. Morrison on the 13th Sept called "William" illigitimate. - OPR Middlebie

There was a Robert Waugh that was born in Hartside, Castleton, Roxburghshire, April 13, 1783 to Thomas Waugh and Christon Ballentine. This may be the tollkeeper Robert Waugh although in the 1851 Census his place of birth is given as Ewes (a bit confusing, isn't it?). The place of birth information on the same census also gives Ewes for William, and Janet, although they were born in Middlebie. It would seem that this is not the same Robert Waugh that was born in Ewes. This Robert died Sept 29, 1853, in Ewes,  at the age of 67 (which would have his year of birth as 1786) and is the Robert Waugh buried in the Ewes Kirk Cemetery. Thomas Waugh and Christon Ballantine also had a son Thomas born March 3, 1772, in Castleton although the 1841 Census (below) would have that Thomas born about 1781 (closer to the year of birth of the Thomas born in Ewes - 1779). In the 1881 Census, it is indicated that Mary Irvine is a "Sheppard's Widow". Based on this information it is difficult to definitively say that the tollbooth Robert Waugh is George's father even though both this Robert and George were in Middlebie Parish in the 1840s...

"Handfasting"

Sir Walter Scott describes the customs of handfasting in chapter 25 of "The Monastery," where he makes Avenel derisively say:- "We Borderers are more wary than your inland clown of Fife and Lothian - we take our wives, like our horses, upon trial. When we are handfasted we are man and wife for a year and day - that space gone by, each may choose another mate, or, at their pleasure, may call the priest to marry them for life - and this we call handfasting." From http://www.electricscotland.com/history/articles/mosspaul.htm

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1841 ..........

1841 Census - Burnmouth, Castleton, Roxburghshire
Robert Waugh and his older brother Thomas
Janet Waugh may be Thomas' daughter
 

Name: Robert Waugh
Age: 55
Estimated birth year: abt 1786
Gender: Male
Where born: Scotland
   
Civil parish: Castleton
County: Roxburghshire
Address: Burnmouth
Occupation: Ag Lab
Parish Number: 784
Household Members:
Name Age
Thomas Waugh 60
Sarah Beattie 50
Robert Waugh 55
Janet Waugh 20
Robert Paster 18
William Robson 16
Robt Ballintine 13
Betty Gavins 23
Helen Elliot 14
Margt Douglas 38

Source Citation: Parish: Castleton; ED: 12; Page:  5; Line: 890; Roll   ; Year: 1841. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1841 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.  Original data: 1841 Scotland Census. Edinburgh, Scotland: General Register Office for Scotland. Reels 1-151. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1841 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 6 June 1841. The following information was requested: name, age, gender, profession, and birthplace.

 

Ainslie's Map of the Southern Part of Scotland, 1821, showing Burnmouth in relation to Langholm and Ewes
Ainslie's Map of the Southern Part of Scotland, 1821,
showing Burnmouth (lower right in Liddesdale) in relation to Langholm and Ewes

 

1851 ..........

In the 1851 Census, Robert Waugh was the Tollkeeper at the "Old Tollbar" at Fiddleton in the Ewes Valley.

1851 Census - Ewes, Dumfriesshire
Robert Waugh and Family

Name: WAUGH , Robert
Address: Old Tollbar(825)
Parish: Ewes
Relationship: head of household
Marital Status: married
Occupation: TOLLKEEPER
Age: 67
Born: born Ewes Dms
Household No: 1/11
Name: WAUGH , Mary (Mary Irvine)
Address: Old Tollbar(825)
Parish: Ewes
Relationship: wife of Robert Waugh
Marital Status: married
Occupation:
Age: 31
Born: born Middlebie Dms
Household No: 1/11
Name: DICKSON , Jane
Address: Old Tollbar(825)
Parish: Ewes
Relationship: household of Robert Waugh
Marital Status:
Occupation: SERVANT house
Age: 14
Born: born Canonbie Dms
Household No: 1/11
Name: WAUGH , William
Address: Old Tollbar(825)
Parish: Ewes
Relationship: son of Robert Waugh
Marital Status:
Occupation:
Age: 4
Born: born Ewes Dms
Household No: 1/11
Name: WAUGH , Janet
Address: Old Tollbar(825)
Parish: Ewes
Relationship: daughter of Robert Waugh
Marital Status:
Occupation:
Age: 1
Born: born Ewes Dms
Household No: 1/11
 

Note: William was born in Middlebie

Fiddleton Bar Tollhouse Photo, 2010

Thomas Waugh (Farmer) died at Burnmouth, Liddesdale, Roxburghshire, November 12, 1851, at the age of 72. This would seem to be the Thomas Waugh born in Ewes in 1779.

1853 ..........

Robert died at Fiddleton Bar, September 29, 1853, at the age of 69 and is buried in the Ewes Kirk cemetery.

1854 ..........

MAIL COACH GUARD

Robert Govenlock, who was landlord of Mosspaul for the long period of forty-five years, was a man of commanding appearance and distinctive personality. He was said to have been brought up at Phaup, where his father was a shepherd. He was for several years a guard on the mail coach, and a picturesque personage in his official uniform of scarlet coat, top boots and hat trimmed with gold braid. The mail coach carried eight passengers - four inside and four outside. The guard was seated on the top of the coach, at the rear end, with accommodation for the mail bags, while in front of him were ensconced a pair of pistols and a blunderbus in case of attack by highwaymen. Nine and a half hours were allowed for the journey of the coach between Edinburgh and Carlisle, the distance being scheduled as 95 miles.

After Govenlock, who was familiarly known as "Gloomy Winter," became landlord of Mosspaul, further additions and improvements were made, three sides being added to the stables, which completed the large square of stabling to the west of the inn, the site of the present bowling green which faces the front entrance to the hotel. For many years the old inn was the scene of much bustle and activity, for at one time several coaches ran daily, and these all pulled up at Mosspaul for a change of horses, the passengers generally at the same time partaking of solid or liquid refreshments. The stabling was extensive, consisting of forty-two stalls in addition to a number of loose boxes, and it is said that he had always twenty-four horses ready for the road.

MEMORABLE SNOWSTORM

As may be inferred, in the depth of winter and in the midst of severe snowstorms, there were many dangerous and exciting episodes in connection with some of the journeys in the bleak and exposed portions of the road, particularly between Linhope and Langholm, One such occurred on a morning in February, 1854, when the mail coach left Carlisle under the charge of William Crozier. The morning was cold, and thin snowflakes were flying about, but the weather did not seem altogether unpromising, though as the coach preceded on its journey the snowstorm began to increase in violence. The Cross Keys at Canonbie had been left behind and the Hollows just passed, when a man was encountered in the middle of the road holding aloft an axe as a danger signal. The coach was drawn up, and in answer to "What's wrang now?" the forester replied, "Ye canna gang ony further, Maister Crozier, there's at least a score o' trees blawn doon and lying across the road, so ye maun juist wait till we make a clearance." Crozier was reputed to have been a man of quick decision, and as he was near Irving House, the residence of the Duke of Buccleuch's chamberlain, he drove into the courtyard there. The passengers and the driver and guard were hospitably treated, and their half-frozen limbs thawed before a blazing log fire.

In about two hours it was announced that the road was cleared, and accordingly the coach proceeded on its northward journey. But Crozier began to calculate that their troubles were not yet over, as they should have met Jamie Govenlock and his coach on the southward journey about Sorbie. But even at Langholm there were no tidings of him, and Crozier, with his intimate knowledge of the road, began to speculate that Jamie would be stuck between Linhope and Mosspaul. And he had been right, for after a slow and perilous run between Fiddleton and Mosspaul he reached the old inn to find Jamie, a son of the landlord, standing in the doorway calmly smoking his pipe, and ready to inform them; that he had left his coach snowed up near Linhope. He advised Crozier not to ventured farther, but to make himself and his passengers as comfortable as possible in the hotel. But Crozier was not easily daunted, and he resolved to make an heroic attempt to reach Hawick that night with the mails.

WHISKY THE REWARD

His plan was to leave the luggage behind him, and lead the fresh horses to the scene of the buried coach, while the other coach should try to reach Carlisle under Govenlock's charge. Fortunately, there were about a dozen carters, whose carts were also embedded in drifts, carousing in the kitchen, and Crozier offered to treat the inn to a bottle of whisky if they would turn out with spades and shovels and endeavour to extricate the coach. A second bottle was promised by one of the passengers, with the result that the men marched in a body, knee deep in the snow, to the scene of the embedded coach, and at once commenced operations with vigour and determination, knowing that two bottles were at their call when they returned to the warm and comfortable kitchen. Crozier and old Jamie Ferguson followed after an interval with the fresh horses bearing the mail bags strapped on their backs. The coach was in due course cleared, turned in the direction of Hawick, and the horses attached. With the prospect of, a comparatively clear road in front of them, the journey was resumed. The snowstorm had ceased, and as darkness set in a keen frost developed. The Tower Hotel was reached at half-past seven, nearly six hours behind time, a crowd surrounding the coach eager to ascertain the cause of the prolonged detention. Needless to say, travelling by coach had its dangers and hardships as well as its pleasures.

From http://www.electricscotland.com/history/articles/mosspaul.htm

1861 ..........

 1861 Census - Dumfriesshire - Ewes
Mary Irvine Waugh and Family
The children's occupations were listed as "Scholar & Pauper".

Name: Mary Waugh
Age: 37
Estimated birth year: abt 1824
Relationship: Head
Gender: Female
Where born: Kilpaterick, Dumfriesshire
Registration Number: 825
Registration district: Ewes
Civil parish: Ewes
County: Dumfriesshire
Address: Fiddelton Old Toll Bar
Occupation: Washer Wooman
ED: 1
Household schedule number: 13
Line: 4
Roll: CSSCT1861_143
Household Members:
Name Age
Mary Waugh 37
William Waugh 14
Janet Waugh 11
Mary Waugh 9

Source Citation: Parish: Ewes; ED: 1; Page:  4; Line: 4; Roll  CSSCT1861_143; Year: 1861. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1861 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Scotland. 1861 Scotland Census. Reels 1-150. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1861 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 7/8 April 1861. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1862 ..........

On March 5, 1862, Mary Waugh reported a housebreaking at Fiddleton Toll.
Two "tramps" were apprehended by Constable Brydon.

On March 5, 1862, Mary Waugh reported a housebreaking at Fiddleton Toll
Courtesy of the Langholm Archive Centre

THE "ENGINEER'S" LAST RUN

Mr Govenlock was one of the original proprietors of the coach called the "Engineer," which was started in 1825 and continued to run till 1862, when it was with­drawn from the road on account of the opening of the railway between Hawick and Carlisle. The last run from Hawick to the South was made on Monday, 30th June, 1862. For some time previously the run had only been to Scotsdyke, and later to Rowanburn, the branch railway line between these places and Carlisle having been opened for traffic. The final run which, unfortunately, Mr Govenlock did not live to participate in, was made an event of outstanding importance. The departure of the coach from the Tower Knowe was witnessed by a large concourse of spectators. The team of four horses bore silver-mounted harness, and Mr William Crozier, landlord of the Tower Hotel, one of the old mail coach drivers, handled the reins. The company, numbering about a dozen, were accompanied by Bandmaster Teal and Sergeant Bunyan of the 5th Roxburgh Volunteer Band, who discoursed cornet selections on the way.

All along the route people turned out to have a farewell look at the coach as it passed. At Northhouse the party were joined by Mr John Fenwick, Mr Crozier's predecessor as landland of the Tower, and long one of the proprietors of the coach, and Mr Robert Govenlock, farmer, Teinside, a son of the old landlord of Mosspaul. At Langholm the company dined sumptuously at the Crown Hotel in the evening, and returned to Hawick by train next day.

COMING OF THE RAILWAY

The opening of the railway line through Liddesdale to Carlisle, sounded the death-knell of old Mosspaul, the road, except for gangrel bodies and a few country carriers, becoming practically deserted, and the licence was allowed to lapse in 1864. For some years the old inn was occupied as a private dwelling-house, but eventually it became tenantless and was ultimately unroofed and allowed to fall into decay and ruin.

From http://www.electricscotland.com/history/articles/mosspaul.htm

1871 ..........

1871 Census - Wilton, Roxburghshire
Mary Waugh and her daughter Mary were visiting Brieryhill Farm, Roxburghshire
Brieryhall Farm is located just to the west of Hawick.

Name: Mary Waugh
Age: 49
Estimated birth year: abt 1822
Relationship: Visitor
Gender: Female
Where born: Kilpatrick, Dumfriesshire
Registration Number: 810
Registration district: Wilton
Civil parish: Wilton
County: Roxburghshire
Address: Brieryhill Farm
Occupation: Annuitant
ED: 7
Household schedule number: 63
Line: 19
Roll: CSSCT1871_181
Household Members:
Name Age
Samuel Mcclune 47
Mary Mcclune 37
James Mcclune 8
Isabella Mcclune 5
Margaret Mcclune 2
Robert Mcclune 6 Mo
John Cairns 74
Robert Storie 21
Thomas Dougherty 19
Catherine Hardie 23
Christina Ingles 22
Mary Waugh 19
Mary Waugh 49

Source Citation: Parish: Wilton; ED: 7; Page:  14; Line: 19; Roll  CSSCT1871_181; Year: 1871. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1871 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1871 Scotland Census. Reels 1-191. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1871 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 2/3 April 1871. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1881 ..........

1881 Census - Dumfriesshire - Ewes
Mary Irvine Waugh with son William and granddaughter Elizabeth Waugh Fenwick.
William Waugh's occupation is listed as "Shepherd (Out of Employ)".
William Tait's occupation is listed as "Labourer".

Name: Mary Waugh
Age: 64
Estimated birth year: abt 1817
Relationship: Head
Gender: Female
Where born: Kirkpatrick Fleming, Dumfriesshire
Registration Number: 825
Registration district: Ewes
Civil parish: Ewes
County: Dumfriesshire
Address: Old Toll. Bar
Occupation: Shepherd'S Widow
ED: 1
Household schedule number: 14
Line: 1
Roll: cssct1881_323
Household Members:
Name Age
Mary Waugh 64
William Waugh 34
Elizabeth Waugh Fenwick 7
William Tait 50

Source Citation: Parish: Ewes; ED: 1; Page:  4; Line: 1; Roll  cssct1881_323; Year: 1881. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1881 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1881 Scotland Census. Reels 1-338. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1881 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 3/4 April 1881. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

1891 ..........

1891 Census - Dumfriesshire - Ewes
Mary Irvine Waugh and granddaughter Elizabeth "Bessie" Waugh

Name: Mary Waugh
Age: 74
Estimated birth year: abt 1817
Relationship: Head
Gender: Female
Where born: Kirkpatrick, Dumfries Shire
Registration Number: 825
Registration district: Ewes
Civil parish: Ewes
County: Dumfriesshire
Address: Fiddleton Cottage
Occupation: Formerly Cook
ED: 1
Household schedule number: 23
Line: 7
Roll: CSSCT1891_394
Household Members:
Name Age
Mary Waugh 74
Bessie Waugh 16

Source Citation: Parish: Ewes; ED: 1; Page:  6; Line: 7; Roll  CSSCT1891_394; Year: 1891. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1891 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1-409. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description: The 1891 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 5/6 April 1891. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

Bessie Waugh's occupation is listed as Dressmaker and she was born in Ewes.

1897 ..........

Mary died at Fiddleton Cottage on July 11, 1897, at the age of 80. 


Monumental Inscriptions - Ewes Churchyard
From The Ewes Valley, by Brenda I. Morrison and R. Bruce McCartney, 2000

In memory of
ROBERT WAUGH
who died at Fiddleton Bar 29th September 1853
in the 67th year of his age
Also MARY IRVING wife of the above
who died at Fiddleton Cottage 11th July 1897
aged 80 years
 

Ewes Kirk Cemetery, September, 2010

- NOTICE -
It no longer seems that "our" Robert Waugh was the Robert Waugh from Ewes.
New evidence suggests that his parents may have been Robert Waugh & Jean Rule of Lochmaben.

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