The Waugh Family
An historical and photographic perspective

The Waugh Family during World War II

Royal Candian Air Force Emblem

Jock Waugh
Jock Waugh

Men with a Purpose

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Jock Waugh applied to enlist in the RCAF aircrew in Oct, 1941, but was found "not qualified medically" due to a hernia.  On June 6, 1943, he re-applied and was recommended for Non-Pilot Navigation Instructor or Education Officer. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force on November 29, 1943, as an Officer Cadet with rank of Sergeant and was immediately transferred to Lachine, Quebec, and then on to Dunnville, Ontario for training. His father (John "the Joker" Waugh) died on December 3, 1943.

John Waugh Dies At Noon, December 3, 1943 (pdf)

Following a protracted illness John Waugh, 76, resident of Nanaimo for 45 years, died at Nanaimo General Hospital at Noon today. Native of Linlithgowshire, Scotland, Mr. Waugh first came to Ontario from the Old Land, but, moved to Nanaimo after 4 years' residence in the eastern province (ed. note - the "Joker" was not known to have lived in Ontario). Since coming here he had been identified with the local coal mines, and had also been a city police officer. He was formerly active in sports, and was president of the Nanaimo Football Club in the heyday of that organization. He was a member of the Vancouver Caledonian Society and was registered as champion B. C. quoiter in 1928. He was an ardent amateur gardener.

His wife pre-deceased him, her death occurringlidiatt on October 13, 1940. He is survived by two brothers William Waugh, of Five Acres, and Andrew Waugh, of Vancouver, also several brothers and sisters living in Scotland. Immediate family survivors include six daughters and two sons. The daughters, Mrs. Wm. Newbury, Nanaimo, Elexies M. Waugh of Nanaimo, Mrs. Charles Mottishaw of Los Angeles, Mrs. George E. Cassidy of Milton Street, Miss Violet Waugh of Victoria and Mrs. Leo Lidiatt of Nanaimo. The sons are John, now enroute to an eastern point where he is to take special RCAF training, and William of Powell River... (Mrs. Leo Lidiatt is Christina Waugh)

"RCAF Station Lachine was a Royal Canadian Air Force station located near Lachine and Dorval, Quebec, Canada, to the west of Montreal. The location of the station was Dorval Airport, which became the Montreal-Dorval International Airport (now Montreal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport). RCAF Station Lachine began operation in 1941 as a transit point for the ferrying of aircraft and the transportation of supplies to Europe during the Second World War. Until 1943, Lachine was the location of one of five British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) manning depots, No. 5 Manning Depot." - from Wikipedia

RCAF Postings for John Waugh
RCAF Postings for John Waugh
See original document

Pilot Officer John Waugh, Dunnville, Ontario
Pilot Officer John Waugh, Dunnville, Ontario
See original documents

Jock Waugh was also stationed at Dunnville, Ontario, as an educational officer. Dunnville Airport opened on November 25, 1940 as one of twenty-eight Service Flying Training Schools (SFTS) constructed under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The Dunnville Airport, then designated as Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) No. 6 SFTS, Dunnville, was a single-engine school for advanced flying training for allied fighter pilots during World War II.

Flying training at the school was divided between two squadrons, each squadron comprised of four ‘flights’. Each ‘flight’ employed 10 instructors each of whom were each responsible for four to five students at any given time. The school graduated a class each month, taking in a fresh course every 28 days. The curriculum seemed like a lot for a 19 year old to absorb in just 16 weeks, the length of conversion time to Harvards in 1943. It included taxiing, straight and level flight, climbing, gliding, stalling, spinning, medium turns, steep turns, climbing turns, precautionary landings, formation flying, navigation, circuits, cross country, map reading, instrument flying, dive bombing, aerobatics, forced landings and night flying. Bombing practice was done over the school’s target in the Grand, five miles northwest of the main aerodrome. Night flying and practice take-off and landings were carried out at relief fields in Kohler and Welland. At its peak in 1943, personnel on the station totaled nearly 1500 including 150 members of the RCAF Women’s Division and almost as many civilians. Aircraft on strength during the same period included 64 Harvard II’s, 36 Harvard IIB’s and 8 Mk II Ansons, with 6 Harvards in storage. The school’s large quantity of NA 64 Yales by this time had been relegated to the role of wireless trainers, painted yellow and flown off the base to RCAF wireless schools throughout Canada. - from RCAF Dunnville No. 6 SFTS by Rob Schweyer

Ron Russell was stationed at Camp Borden with the Canadian Army Tank Corp. Camp Borden was the most important training facility for the Canadian military during World War II. See The Russell Family during World War II.


Winnie & Jock Waugh

Jock Waugh & Winnie Russell
Jock & Winnie
Arcade Photography Studio
20 Yonge Arcade, Toronto, Ontario
Joy, Jock & Winnie
Joy, Jock & Winnie
Arcade Photography Studio
20 Yonge Arcade, Toronto, Ontario
Winnie, Jock & Agnus (Ethel)
Winnie, Jock & Agnes (Ethel)
Arcade Photography Studio
20 Yonge Arcade, Toronto, Ontario

In May, 1944, Jock Waugh was promoted to the rank of Flying Officer. On January 4, 1945, he was transferred to Moncton, New Brunswick for a further transfer overseas where he was stationed in Bournemouth and Odiham, England and Brussells, Belgium. His military records indicate that he embarked for the UK from Halifax, Nova Scotia on Jan 30 and disembarked in Greenock, UK on Feb 8, 1945.

RCAF Posting to Moncton and Overseas for John Waugh, Jan 4, 1945
RCAF Posting to Moncton and Overseas for John Waugh, Jan 4, 1945
See original document

Bournemouth Airport began as RAF Hurn on 1 August 1941, during World War II. It was used for paratroop training and as a glider base before the North African Landings in 1943. Prior to D-Day, it was the base of 570 Squadron, who landed agents and dropped supplies to the French Resistance. The hardened runways of the airfield saw extensive use by United States Army Air Forces in the preparations for D-Day and the subsequent Battle of Normandy. It was also the home base of 84 Group, RAF Second Tactical Air Force, comprising nine squadrons of Typhoons, who flew daily to France supporting ground forces. - Wikipedia

Odiham: When World War II commenced, the resident Army Co-operation Wing (No 614 Squadron) moved to France, and No 225 Squadron, flying Lysanders, took possession of the Station. They were followed by Free French, Belgian and Canadian training units. In June 1943, Fighter Command took control of Odiham, flying Mustangs and later, Typhoons. On 'D' Day, the unit assumed a transit role for 'follow-up' elements, and later became a Prisoner of War (PoW) Reception Centre. During the summer of 1945, a Canadian Transport Wing was formed in the United Kingdom, and for just over a year RAF Odiham became part of the Royal Canadian Air Force. - from Royal Air Force

Jock Waugh's dog tags
Jock Waugh's dog tags


CAN C40131 OFFICER J WAUGH UC RCAF

RCAF Identity Card for John Waugh, Jan 29, 1945
RCAF Identity Card for John Waugh, Jan 29, 1945
See original document

England, United Kingdom

Lancaster Bomber
Lancaster


Lancaster Bombing Run

The bomber offensive mounted by the Royal Air Force, the Royal Canadian Air Force, and the air forces of other Commonwealth countries during the Second World War has been described as the most continuous and gruelling operation of war ever carried out. It lasted for some 2000 days - and for four long years, while the world waited for the tide slowly to turn, Bomber Command offered the only weapon capable of waging war against Hitler's European fortress: "Strike Hard - Strike Sure".

London, England
 

Jock Waugh c 1945 at Trafalgar Square, London

Jock Waugh c 1945

Jock Waugh & unknown friend bicycling somewhere in Europe c 1945
Jock Waugh & Roy Drury (?) bicycling somewhere in Europe c 1945

The Westminster Regiment Emblem

- Roy Drury -

Roy Drury

Drury, R. (Roy) – Private Canadian Army Overseas

- May/44, p.3 – (K-65599) B. Coy., Westminster Regt. CA CMF
- Jul/46, p10 - “From the beaches of Pachino to the Po valley, with interim stops at the Hitler and Gothic lines, at Cassino, at the Morro and a score of other natural obstacles, Powell River was always there…with the Westminsters (was)…Roy Drury.”

- from Powell River Museum - A Record of Service


K 65599 Pte. Drury, R.C. "B" Company, Westminster Regt.
Canadian Mediterranean Forces Overseas
From Jock Waugh's "little black book".

The Westminster Regiment: The unit was converted to a motor battalion and designated The Westminster Regiment (Motor) in early 1941. On May 27, 1941, the unit entrained at the CPR station in Vancouver for deployment to Camp Borden. At Borden the unit became part of the 1st Armoured Brigade, 1st Armoured Division. The regiment sailed from Halifax on HMT Andes for Great Britain on November 13, 1941, exactly 26 years from the day that the 47th Battalion CEF had sailed for Europe from the same port. The unit disembarked in Liverpool on November 24, 1941. On May 11, 1944, the attack on the Gustav Line and the Hitler Line commenced with the Westminsters and the 5th Armoured Division forming the exploitation force, hoping to break into the Liri Valley and the assault on Rome. The advance through the Liri valley included the Westminster's most famous action, the assault water crossing at the Melfa River. The Officer Commanding, "A" Company at the Battle of the Melfa River, Major Jack Mahony, was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry and leadership under fire during that action fought in conjunction with the tanks of Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians). This action cemented a friendship between the two regiments that has endured since the Second World War. The entire division was relieved from the line on May 30, 1944, and carried out "rest and refit" duties near the villages of Baia and Latina. By August 1944 the Anzio Bridgehead force had broken out, Rome had fallen and the advance to the Po River commenced. The Westies joined the fight on August 6, 1944, at Montefalco in the advance to the next German defensive position, the Gothic Line which the regiment engaged starting on August 26. The unit was involved in the crossing of the Fogia River and the Conca River. The unit completed the action on September 5, 1944. - from Wikipedia

 

This is to certify that Flying Officer John Waugh Served on Active Service with the RCAF
This is to certify that Flying Officer John Waugh Served on Active Service with the RCAF
See original document

Jock Waugh was awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp. The Canadian Volunteer Service Medal is granted to persons of any rank in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Canada who voluntarily served on Active Service and had honourably completed eighteen months ( 540 days) total voluntary service between September 3, 1939 to March 1, 1947. Jock served from November 29, 1943 until he was honourably discharged on May 8, 1946.

Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp

DEDICATION

SERVICE

HONOUR

SACRIFICE

In days like these there is only one dedication possible - it must be to those whose names, being emblazoned upon the School's Honour Roll, are imperishably wrought into the fabric of Dominion and Empire. Last year, two hundered: this year two hundred and forty... and so our honour grows!

To those who have answered Sullen Moloch's highest challenge and now dwell in a light beyond our setting suns, "Where, beyond these voices, there is peace," we promise to take up the unfinished task; to match our honour with their own; and, in the mighty words of our most inspired literature, to "Withstand in the evil day; and having done all, "TO STAND".

See the names on Dedication Service, Brooks High c 1946

 

The Waugh Family after World War II

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