The Welsh Family
An historical and photographic perspective

Corehead, Dumfriesshire & Upper Minzion, Carterhope, and Fruid, Tweeedsmuir

Index of Official Parish Registries and Statutory Registries for Births, Marriages and Deaths

Map showing Earlshaugh, Carterhope, Fruid and Upper Minzion, Tweedsmuir Parish, Peebleshire, and Corhead in Moffat
Map showing Earlshaugh, Carterhope, Fruid and Upper Minzion, Tweedsmuir Parish, Peebleshire, and Corhead in Moffat
Mostyn Armstrong, 1775
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

National Record of the Historic Environment - Fruid Castle
National Record of the Historic Environment - Corehead

 The Welsh Family in The Tweedie Family - A Genealogy
Upper Tweed - The Welshes of Tweedsmuir

The Waugh Family Library

A Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Scotsmen, Vol 5., by Robert Chambers, 1856 (6.3 Mb pdf)
A History of Peebleshire by William Chambers, 1864 (15 Mb pdf)
The Welsh Family, an excerpt from The Tweedie Family - A Genealogy, by McNichols, Tweedie & Wyckoff, 2005 (4.7 Mb pdf)
The History of the Tweedie, or Tweedy, Family by Michael Forbes Tweedie, 1902 (17.7 Mb pdf)

 

The Corehead Farm

Map showing Corheade, R.B. Armstrong's facsimile of Aglionby Platt
Map showing Corheade (upper left), R.B. Armstrong's facsimile of Aglionby Platt, 1590

Tradition starts by going back to the days of King Duncan
and to his grant to the Hallidays of the Corehead estate...

Tradition...
Halliday of Corehead
From Dumfriesshire - The Corehead Period 1039-1453

Dumfriesshire - The Corehead Period 1039-1453
The Escape from the Devil's Beef Tub | Corehead - Borders Forest Trust | Corehead Archeology
National Record of the Historic Environment - Corehead

Corehead has a rich historical past and features many archaeological sites. William Wallace's sister married the Laird of Corehead, Thom Halliday and in 1297 Wallace is reputed to have gathered men from the Ettrick Forest and Border Clans at Corehead Tower. It is from here he led his first attack against the English. The tower no longer exists and its exact location is still uncertain. Wallace used the area as a base and in 1298 was made Guardian of Scotland at Kirk of the Lowes overlooking St Mary's Loch. - from Corehead - Borders Forest Trust

"Syne to Gilbank he passed or it was nycht,
Apon the morn, with hys four men, him dycht;
To the Cor-hed without restng he raid,
Quhar his neve Thom Halliday him baid."
from a poem by "Blind Hary" c. 1490

In other words, Wallace rode all night with his four men past Gilbank to Corhead where his brother in law lived.

Corehead Farm is at the heart of Reiver territory where Border clans such as the Armstrong, Johnstone, Douglas, Maxwell, Kerr, Oliver, Moffat and Graham families fought fiercely to defend their land, kin and livestock. The deep hollow of the Devil's Beef Tub is where many of the stolen cattle were hidden. The landmark’s unusual name is derived from its use as the hiding place for cattle stolen by the notorious Border Reivers, otherwise known as the Johnstone clan, who were commonly referred to by their enemies as "devils".

"Within the bounds of Annandale
The gentle Johnstones ride,
They have been there a thousand years,
A thousand years they'll bide."
from a poem by Sir Walter Scott

In 1684 the estate was held by James Johnston of Corehead. In 1707, Walter Johnstone, "surgeon's first mate in the service of the Company of Scotland trading to Africa and the Indies, in their expedition to Darien, brother german of William J., of Corehead" filed a "Testament Dative and Inventory" with the Edinburgh Commisary Court (ref # CC8/8/83).

 

1685

Map showing Corehead, Earlshaugh, Kartrop (Carterhope), Fruidd and Minno (Minzion)
Map showing Corehead, Earlshaugh, Kartrop (Carterhope), Fruidd and Minno (Minzion)
Timothy Pont and Joan Blaeu, 1654
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

"Corehead had a history of hiding fugitives"

The said Colonel James Douglas and his party, shot to death John Hunter for no alleged cause but running out from the house at Corehead, the fame year, 1685.

"The said Col. James Douglas and his party, shot to Death John Hunter for no alledged cause but running out from the House at Corehead, the same year, 1685"

His death was first recorded by Alexander Shields in 1690: ‘Item, the said Col: James Douglas and his party, shot to Death John Hunter for no alledged Cause, but running out from the house at Corehead, the same year, 1685.’ (Shields, A Short Memorial, 35.) The officer held responsible for Hunter’s death by the Society people was Colonel James Douglas, the commander of His Majesty’s Regiment of Foot Guards... The estate was held by James Johnston of Corehead. In 1678, he was appointed a commissioner for raising the Cess Tax. In 1689, he was commissioned as a captain of the militia to defend the Revolution. (RPS, 1678/6/22; 1689/3/82.) Corehead had a history of hiding fugitives. A ‘George Hunter, in Corehead’ was listed under Peeblesshire on the published Fugitive Roll of May 1684 for resetting fugitives. It is possible that John Hunter and George Hunter were kin. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 223.) The meeting point of the boundaries of Dumfriesshire, Lanarkshire and Peeblesshire lies a little way to the north-west of Corehead.

"Welsh got out... making his way to his aunt's home at Carterhope"

In the nineteenth century, local traditions were recorded by Simpson and Thomson which interwove Hunter’s story with that of a companion, ‘——’ Welsh, the ‘Babe of Tweedhopefoot’. The traditions were primarily about the story of Welsh, rather than that of Hunter. How reliable a guide they are to the history of John Hunter’s death is not known. Simpson’s tradition claimed that Hunter was a ‘native of the same place’ as Welsh, i.e., that he was a resident of Tweedsmuir parish. An ‘Adam Hunter, in Fingland’, Tweedsmuir parish, was listed under Peeblesshire on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 223; Simpson, Traditions, 113.) ‘Welsh got out through the Skail Step, otherwise named Coolin Pass, and on to the moor above, where for a time he was master of the situation, for the ground being rough with moss and hay, a hardy peasant could easily outstrip the best mounted trooper. On he flew past Earlshaugh, making for his aunt’s home at Carterhope, which he at length reached in safety.’ (Thomson, Martyr Graves, 448-9.)

- from The Escape from the Devil's Beef Tub

 

In the year 1720...


From The History of the Tweedie, or Tweedy, Family by Michael Forbes Tweedie, 1902
 

"John Welsh in Corehead"

John Welsh, in Corehead, and his wife may have had at least five children: Elizabeth, Isobel, James, Janet and Mary.

Elizabeth Welsh & John Murray | Isobel Welch & John Hope | James Welsh & Isobel Leethon | Janet Welsh & George Welsh
Mary Welsh & John Welsh

Elizabeth Welsh & John Murray

John Murray... in Castlegill & Eliz Welsh Daughter to John Welsh in Corhead were proclaimed for the last time
John Murray... in Castlegill & Eliz Welsh Daughter to John Welsh in Corhead were proclaimed for the last time
See original document

Elizabeth Welsh and John Murray were married in Moffat on April 17, 1720. They had at least nine children (all born in Moffat): Rachel (born April 27, 1724); John (born Dec 13, 1725); William (born Feb 8, 1727); Isobel (born Sept 7, 1728); Robert (born Oct 28, 1729); David (born July 16, 1732); Archibald (born Dec 27, 1732); Isobell (born Aug 22, 1734); Mary (born July 4, 1737); and James (born Feb 2, 1743). - Scotland's People

1723

Isobel Welsh & John Hope

I have recently discovered that my 6xggrandparents, Isabella WELSH & John HOPE, may have been buried in Tweedsmuir. Little is known of them by me other that I'm guessing that they would have been born approx 1700. Isabella's father was John Welsh of Corehead. - from Bill, houseofbrown, on Rootschat.com, May 7, 2017

Isobel Welsh and John Hope were married on Aug 11, 1723, in Moffat, and may have had at least two children: John (born about 1727, died Dec 17, 1781, in Troloss, Crawford and buried in Tweedsmuir); and James (born about 1732, died Aug 1, 1793). - from Descendants of John Hope of Tweedsmuir

James Hope & Jane Proudfoot

 

James Welsh & Isobel Leethon

James Welsh and Isobel Leethon were married on Oct 20, 1723, in Moffat, and had at least four children: Thomas (born Dec 21, 1724 in Corehead); David (born March 6, 1729 in Meikleholmeside); Jean (born Jan 13, 1731, in Meikleholmeside);  James (born Sept 24, 1732, in Meikleholmeside); Andrew (born May 6, 1734, in Meikleholmeside); Isobel (born Sept 5, 1737, in Meikleholmeside); another Andrew (born July 28, 1740, in Granton); and Mary (born May 19, 1742, in Granton. Meiklehomeside is located just south of Corehead and Granton is just between the two.

 

1733

Janet Welsh & George Welsh

March 25, 1733... George Welsh in Frood and Janet Welsh in Corhead were proclaimed for the third and last time.
March 25, 1733... George Welsh in Frood and Janet Welsh in Corhead were proclaimed for the third and last time.
See original document

Janet Welsh & George Welsh

 

The Welsh Family of Tweedsmuir

Map showing Kartrop (Carterhope), Fruidd (Frood) and Minion (Minzion or Menzion)
Map showing Kartrop (Carterhope), Fruidd (Frood), Minion (Minzion or Menzion) and Kingledoors
Timothy Pont and Joan Blaeu, 1654
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

1555

"David Welsh, who appears as tenant of Craig Kingledoors from 1555 to 1573, acted as bailie on 15/5/1567 when John Hay of Talla took investment as heir to his father William Hay in Craig Kingledoors and Talla. [In 1470 the Hays had acquired half of Over Kingledoors which may have been the Steding of Kingildurris which Lord Hay allowed James Tweedie of Drumelzier and his son Patrick to occupy. In 1580 John Hay of Talla resigned his lands of Talla to William, Lord Hay of Yester, but retained his lands of Kingledoors.]

In 1585 William Welsh in Craig Kingledoors and John Welsh in Over Menzion (probably sons of the above David), and Walter Tweedie in Chapel Kingledoors, witnessed the investment of William Hay in his father’s lands of Kingledoors which passed to him. The investment excepted a quarter of the lands possessed by Andrew Hay (brother of William), rector of Renfrew, who about 1590 made it over to his brother who, styled William Hay of Wyndene, became proprietor of the whole. In 1596 William Welsh, tenant of Craig Kingledoors witnessed the investment in Craig Kingledoors of William Hay, by then styled ‘of Linplum’ [near Gifford in East Lothian], as heir to his father, John Hay of Talla,on a precept by James, Lord Hay of Yester.

The above John Welsh may have had two sons Humphrey, who possibly had three sons W1/1 Humphrey, W1/2 John and W1/3 Walter and John of Over Minzion whose son James may have been apprenticed 24/12/1651 to Thomas Welsche litster. Thomas may have been an apprentice litster in 1642, son of Walter Welsh of Fruid. Walter’s likely other son George was a merchant, who married, in Edinburgh 2/10/1651, Janet Johnston; probably the same George Welsh, indweller, who was interred on 23/5/1692 in the Foulis tomb in Greyfriars churchyard; his widow was interred 17/1/1698 and his son Humphrey, born Edinburgh 1666, died 5/7/1684, was interred there 5/7/1684 in ‘wast laig ’."

- From The Welsh Family in The Tweedie Family - A Genealogy

 

Over Menzion

Ruins of Upper Menzion Farmhouse
Ruins of Upper Menzion Farmhouse
Photo courtesy ajbhope.net

The Great Plague of 1645

Thomas Muchet the Minister of Tweedmuir Kirk writing in the 1791/99 Statistical Account(1) mentioned the following."Near Nether Menzion, on the banks of the Fruid, is the grave of Marion Chisholm, who it is said have hither from Edinburgh, while the plague was raging there, and to have communicated the pestilential infection to the inhabitants of three different farms in the Parish, viz, Nether Menzion, Glencothe and Fruid by means of a bundle of clothes, which she brought with her, in consequence which, a number of persons died, and were buried in the ruins of their houses, which the neighbours pulled down upon their dead bodies."

The actual site of the grave of Marion Chisholm on the banks of the Fruid Water is not recorded. This episode has been confirmed from the Tweedsmuir Kirk Records that on "16th July 1645, Marione Chisholm, daughter of John Chisholm in Nether Menione died by pestilence and two weeks later John's wife Elizabeth also "depairted this lyff by pestilence."

A month later there were further misfortunes at Nether Menzion - the following from the Tweedsmuir Kirk records(2) also (3)

"1645, The 14 of August Sarah Tweedie servant to Margaret Tweedie relic of William Whyte Robert Portieous in Nether Menione depairted this lyff by Petilence."

"1645, the 16 of August Margaret Tweedie relic of William Quhyte Robert Portious in Nether-Minion departed this lyf about 12 hours at night and that same night hir Youngest daughter depairted this lyf about 8 hour at night and upon the 18 of August a chyld of her daughers about 4 or 5 years of age depairted this lyf and were all buried togedder said 18 day of August and all died of the pestilence."

The date of 1645 is the date of the worst outbreak of the plague that visited Upper Tweed. This event is described by John Buchan in his classic novel Witch Wood(4). In the novel the village of Woodilee, at the centre of the story, is a thinly disguised Broughton. In the book the heroine - Katrine Yester - dies of the plague.

The farm of Glencothe (Glencutho) mentioned above is now under the waters of the Talla reservoir and was situated at the confluence of the Glencutho burn and the Talla Water.

- from ajbhope.net

1667

John "Black" Welsh

John "Black" Welsh and his wife had at least two children both born in Over Menzion, Tweedsmuir: John (born June 27, 1667, died April 16, 1711); and Rev. James Welsh (born Aug 27, 1671, died 1755). - from The Welsh Family of Tweedsmuir & DAKWelsh Family Tree on Ancestry.com

John Welsh | James Welsh

John Welsh

 John Welsh (son of John "Black" Welsh was born June 27, 1667, died April 16, 1711) and his wife had at least three children all born in Over Menzion: John (born about 1703, died May 12, 1779); George (born about 1707 and who married Janet Welsh, daughter of George Welsh  of Corehead, died at Corehead Feb 25, 1771); and Robert (born about 1709, died Aug 29, 1787).

John Welsh & Mary Welsh | George Welsh & Janet Welsh | Robert Welsh & Grizel Burnet

 


Monumental Inscriptions - Tweedsmuir Churchyard

John Welsh died Over Menzion April 16, 1711 aged 44.
John Welsh late tenant Over Menzion died 1779 aged 76.
Sarah wife of John Welsh died Heddleshope.

Robert Welsh, Mossfennan, died Aug 29, 1787, aged 78.
Wife Grizel Burnet died Oct 16, 1744 aged 30.
John Welsh Esq. of Mossfennan died July 16, 1797 aged 57.
Ann Burnet died March 24, 1784 aged 68.
William Welsh Esq. of Mossfennan died Feb 8, 1823 aged 82,
Wife Christian Welsh died July 23, 1811.
Grizel Welsh died Oct 11, 1778 aged 13 days.
Ann Welsh died Nov 9, 1806 aged 25.
Christian Welsh died Jan 4, 1812, aged 15.
Caroline Welsh died June 30, 1814, aged 14 years 8 months.
Grace Welsh died March 13, 1855, aged 67.
Robert Welsh Esq. of Mossfennan died June 28, 1855, aged 72.

Robert Welsh tenant Coich son of George died March 26, 1813 (?),
Wife Margaret Scott died Dec 20, 1822 aged 66.
Alex Welsh of Harestone died Gibraltar 1810 (or 20),
Wife Janet Ballantyne died Moffat Sept 1850,
Son George M. Welsh died Dumfries July 1833,
Daughter Katherine died Edinburgh Feb 18, 1833 (?),
Son Alex died Warnanbool, Victoria, Feb 20, 1858,
Daughter Margaret wife of James Gordon died Aberdeen Nov 1884.

- from Peebleshire Monumental Inscriptions pre-1855, compiled by Sheila A. Scott

The above John Welsh, late tenant in Over Menzion, died in Heddleshope on May 12, 1779.

The above Robert Welsh, Mossfennan, was buried in Tweedsmuir on Sept 1, 1787.

The above Grace Welsh (daughter of William Welsh and Christian Welsh), gentlewoman, died at Garden, Glenholm, Peebles, on March 13, 1855.

The above Robert Welsh, Esq. (son of William Welsh and Christian Welsh) died in Mossfennan, Glenholm, Peebles on June 28, 1855 at the age of 72. The informant was William Welsh, nephew.

The above Margaret Welsh (daughter of Alexander Welsh and Janet Ballantyne and wife of James Gordon) died in Aberdeen on Dec 1, 1884 at the age of 77. The informant was George Carson, son and inmate.

 

The Killing Time

1684

"The Killing Time was a period of conflict in Scottish history between the Presbyterian Covenanter movement, based largely in the south west of the country, and the government forces of Kings Charles II and James VII. The period, roughly from 1680 to the Glorious Revolution of 1688, was subsequently called The Killing Time by Robert Wodrow in his The History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland from the Restoration to the Revolution, published in 1721–22. It is an important episode in the martyrology of the Church of Scotland." - Wikipedia

"In May, 1684, a royal proclamation was issued denouncing those charged with rebellion, who had fled from justice, but declaring that if they should present themselves 'betwixt and the first of August next ensuing' and shew to any justices of the peace that 'they they had taken the bond or test in due time', they would be 'relaxed gratis'. The proclamation terminates with a long roll of fugitives, among whom the following is the list belonging to Peebleshire, all seemingly in humble life". - From A history of Peebleshire by William Chambers, 1864

George Hunter in Corehead, Adam Hunter in Fingland,
James Welsh in Fingland, John Welsh in Minzien


From A history of Peebleshire by William Chambers, 1864

"Running out from the house at Corehead"

The said Colonel James Douglas and his party, shot to death John Hunter for no alleged cause but running out from the house at Corehead, the fame year, 1685.

On he flew past Earlshaugh, making for his aunt’s home at Carterhope, which he at length reached in safety

His death was first recorded by Alexander Shields in 1690: ‘Item, the said Col: James Douglas and his party, shot to Death John Hunter for no alledged Cause, but running out from the house at Corehead, the same year, 1685.’ (Shields, A Short Memorial, 35.) The officer held responsible for Hunter’s death by the Society people was Colonel James Douglas, the commander of His Majesty’s Regiment of Foot Guards... The estate was held by James Johnston of Corehead. In 1678, he was appointed a commissioner for raising the Cess Tax. In 1689, he was commissioned as a captain of the militia to defend the Revolution. (RPS, 1678/6/22; 1689/3/82.) Corehead had a history of hiding fugitives. A ‘George Hunter, in Corehead’ was listed under Peeblesshire on the published Fugitive Roll of May 1684 for resetting fugitives. It is possible that John Hunter and George Hunter were kin. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 223.) The meeting point of the boundaries of Dumfriesshire, Lanarkshire and Peeblesshire lies a little way to the north-west of Corehead. In the nineteenth century, local traditions were recorded by Simpson and Thomson which interwove Hunter’s story with that of a companion, ‘——’ Welsh, the ‘Babe of Tweedhopefoot’. The traditions were primarily about the story of Welsh, rather than that of Hunter. How reliable a guide they are to the history of John Hunter’s death is not known. Simpson’s tradition claimed that Hunter was a ‘native of the same place’ as Welsh, i.e., that he was a resident of Tweedsmuir parish. An ‘Adam Hunter, in Fingland’, Tweedsmuir parish, was listed under Peeblesshire on the published Fugitive Roll of 1684. (Jardine, ‘United Societies’, II, 223; Simpson, Traditions, 113.) ‘Welsh got out through the Skail Step, otherwise named Coolin Pass, and on to the moor above, where for a time he was master of the situation, for the ground being rough with moss and hay, a hardy peasant could easily outstrip the best mounted trooper. On he flew past Earlshaugh, making for his aunt’s home at Carterhope, which he at length reached in safety.’ (Thomson, Martyr Graves, 448-9.)

According to Simpson, at Carterhope, Welsh made one of those cunning escapes which are found in many later traditions about the Covenanters:

‘He arrived at the house without having been seen by the troopers, and placed himself by the fire, to wait the result. The soldiers, though they did not see him enter, had nevertheless followed in the track in which he had fled, and at length came to the place. They entered in their usual uproarious manner, while Welsh was sitting apparently unconcerned before the fire. The soldiers not expecting, perhaps, to find the object of their pursuit in the hut, and having no personal knowledge of him, did not seem to notice him. The mistress of the house, however, fearing lest a discovery should by some means be made, resorted to a kind of stratagem to prevent suspicion. She approached Welsh, who appeared to be carelessly dozing over the fire, and giving him a heavy slap between the shoulders, commanded him to rise and to proceed to his work, chiding him for his slothfulness in sitting all day cowering by the hearth, while his proper business was neglected. He took the hint, and withdrew from the apartment. The soldiers naturally conceived that he was a person belonging to the house, and consequently made no inquiries. He often remarked, that the kindest cuff he ever received was from the gudewife of Carterhope, whose presence of mind, at that critical moment, was in all likelihood the means of saving his life.’ (Simpson, Traditions, 114.)

According to the 1892 letter’s version of his escape:

‘Here his aunt made him strip and put on old working clothes, and then said, Sit ye doun by the fire. By and bye the soldiers came to the door and demanded the fugitive. She told them to search the house, and at the same time called out to Welsh, Get up and haud the sodgers horses. He did as he was bid. They searched the house in vain, then came out, mounted, and rode off, leaving Welsh exactly as they found him.’ (Thomson, Martyr Graves, 449.)

- from The Escape from the Devil's Beef Tub

Tweedsmuir

Map showing Corehead, Cartrope (Carterhope), Frood and Minion (Minzion)
Map showing Corehead, Cartrope (Carterhope), Frood and Minion (Minzion or Menzion)
William Edgar, 1741
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

 

1721

The Rev. James Welsh

From 1721 to 1754 the minister of Tweedsmuir was James Welsh, the first and only native of the parish to become its minister. He was born at Over Menzion and after graduating at the University of Edinburgh became a probationer assistant to William Higgins – the minister from 1698 to 1718. The congregation wished James Welsh to succeed Mr Higgins when the latter died, but initially this was opposed by the heritors, who had their own favoured candidate. However, in 1721 the synod ordered the presbytery to proceed with the appointment. During his time as minister Mr Welsh had a long fight to keep the kirk in repair and to make his manse habitable. In 1732 he chose as his assistant Christopher Cairns, a young man with a similar background to his own. Mr Cairns succeeded in 1755, but only lived on for six years as minister.

- from Upper Tweed, Tweedsmuir Parish: The 2nd Hundred Years

 

1727

John Welsh & Mary Welsh

1727, April 28 was married John Welch and Mary Welsch Daughter of John Welch in ?
1727, April 28 was married John Welch and Mary Welsch Daughter of John Welch in Corhead?
See original document

John Welsh (born about 1703, son of John Welsh) married Mary Welsh (daughter of John Welsh in Corhead?) in Tweedsmuir on April 28, 1727. John Welsh (of Upper Minion / Over Menzion) and Mary Welsh may have had at least five children born / baptised in Tweedsmuir: John (b. April 9, 1728); Jean (b. July 14, 1729); Margaret (b. Feb 2, 1731); Elisabeth (b. Nov 13, 1734); and James (b. Feb 12, 1736). John and Mary may also have had a daughter Mary who married James Tweedie Feb 2, 1759.


John Welsh and his spouse Mary Welsh had a son baptized called James. The witnesses were Alexander Tweedie and Robert Hope
See original document

 

1740

Robert Welsh & Grizel Burnet

Robert Welsh (son of John Welsh) married Grizel Burnet in about 1740. They had at least two children: John (b. about 1740, died in Mossfennan July 16, 1797); and William (b. about 1741, died in Mossfennan on Feb 8, 1823).

William Welsh & Christian Welsh


Monumental Inscriptions - Tweedsmuir Churchyard

Robert Welsh, Mossfennan, died Aug 29, 1787, aged 78.
Wife Grizel Burnet died Oct 16, 1744 aged 30.
John Welsh Esq. of Mossfennan died July 16, 1797 aged 57.
Ann Burnet died March 24, 1784 aged 68.
William Welsh Esq. of Mossfennan died Feb 8, 1823 aged 82,
Wife Christian Welsh died July 23, 1811.
Grizel Welsh died Oct 11, 1778 aged 13 days.
Ann Welsh died Nov 9, 1806 aged 25.
Christian Welsh died Jan 4, 1812, aged 15.
Caroline Welsh died June 30, 1814, aged 14 years 8 months.
Grace Welsh died March 13, 1855, aged 67.
Robert Welsh Esq. of Mossfennan died June 28, 1855, aged 72.

- from Peebleshire Monumental Inscriptions pre-1855, compiled by Sheila A. Scott

 

1750

Humphrey Welsh & Margaret Tweedie

Alexander Welsh & Marion Tweedie

Alexander Welsh of Hearthstone & Marion Tweedie of Nether Minzon


From The History of the Tweedie, or Tweedy, Family by Michael Forbes Tweedie, 1902

 

1753

Mossfennan

"In 1753, Mossfennan and part of Logan were purchased for L2600, by Robert Welsh, who, in minute of sale, is designated 'tenant in Mossfennan', and whose forefathers had occupied land in Tweedsmuir for several centuries. A brother of this Robert Welsh was grandfather of the late Rev. Dr. Welsh, Professor of Church History in the University of Edinburgh. The Rev. William Welsh, great grandson of the purchaser, and minister of the Free Church, Broughton, is now in possession of Mossfennan, the lands of which extend about two miles along the Tweed..." - From A history of Peebleshire by William Chambers, 1864

Map showing Mossfennan, Glenholm and Tweedsmuir
Map showing Mossfennan, Glenholm and Tweedsmuir
Mostyn Armstrong, 1775
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

 

1759

James Tweedie of Nether Minzon and Mary, daughter of John Welsh of Over Minzon


From The History of the Tweedie, or Tweedy, Family by Michael Forbes Tweedie, 1902


February 2, 1759, was married James Tweedie and Marray Welsh
See original document

 

1772

1772, April 3. Died at Hearthstane and was buried in the churchyard here, Margaret Tweedie spouse to Humphrey Welsh...
1772, April 3. Died at Hearthstane and was buried in the churchyard here, Margaret Tweedie spouse to Humphrey Welsh...

 

1775

Map of Tweedsmuir showing Tweedie, Esq at Oliver, Hunter, Esq at Polmood and Welsh, Esq at Mossfennan
Map of Tweedsmuir showing Tweedie, Esq at Oliver, Hunter, Esq at Polmood and Welsh, Esq at Mossfennan
From The Roads from Edinburgh to Moffat, Taylor & Skinner, 1775
Courtesy National Library of Scotland


 

George Welsh & Janet Welsh
Born: about 1707 Born: about 1710
Place: Fruid, Tweedsmuir? Place: Corhead, Moffat, Dumfriesshire?
Married: March 25, 1733
Place: Corhead, Moffat, Dumfriesshire
Died: Feb 25, 1771 Died: Feb, 1753
Place: Corhead, Moffat, Dumfriesshire  Place: Carterhope, Peebleshire
Buried: Tweedsmuir Parish Churchyard Buried: Tweedsmuir Parish Churchyard

James Welsh & Hannah Fletcher | Robert Welsh & Margaret Scott | Margaret Welsh & Adam Atchinson
William Welsh & Marion Waugh | William Welsh & Sarah Ballantyne | William Welsh & Marion Tweedie
David Welsh & Margaret Welsh | Ann Welsh & Adam Tait | Christian Welsh & James Tod |Mary Welsh & William Tod

DNA: We have an Ancestry.com dna match with DAKWelsh who has George Welsh and Janet Welsh in his tree. We also have an Ancestry DNA match with rabni who has an Isabela Tait (b.1819 in Traquhair, Peebleshire whose father was John Tait) although we have not been able to make the connection from her to "our" Adam Tait and Ann Welsh. We also have an Ancestry.com DNA match with "scotsgirl44" who has Humphrey Welsh & Margaret Tweedie in her tree. We also have an Ancestry.com DNA match with Steven Campbell who has Adam Tait and Anne Welsh inn his tree. We also have an Ancestry.com DNA match with "D.B." who has Mary Tait & Thomas Borthwick in their tree. We also have an Ancestry.com DNA match with Michael Antoszek who has Ann Welsh & Adam Tait in his tree.

George Welsh in Frood and Janet Welsh in Corhead

March 25, 1733... George Welsh in Frood and Janet Welsh in Corhead were proclaimed for the third and last time.
March 25, 1733... George Welsh in Frood and Janet Welsh in Corhead were proclaimed for the third and last time.
See original document

George Welsh (of Fruid, Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire, born about 1707) and Janet Welsh (of Corehead, Moffat, Dumfriesshire, born about 1710) were married on March 25, 1733, in Moffat and they may have had at least eleven children born in Tweedsmuir: John (born Jan 2, 1735, witnesses James Welsh and Alexander Tweedie); Jean (born Feb 11, 1736, witnesses James Welsh and Robert Welsh); James (born May 28, 1737, witnesses John Welsh and James Welsh, died March 15, 1799 in Liverpool, Lancashire, England); Robert (born July 25, 1739, witnesses John Welsh and Robert Welsh); Margaret (born about 1740); George (born Sept 15, 1741, witnesses John Welsh and James Welsh); Wallam (born June 2, 1743, witnesses John Welsh and James Welsh); David (born April 21, 1745); Ann (born May 25, 1747, witnesses John Welsh and Robert Welsh); twins Christian and Mary (born Feb 17, 1752, witnesses James Welsh in Fruid and John Welsh in Over Minzion).

 

Children Born Place Died Place
John Jan 2, 1735 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire    
Jean Feb 11, 1736 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire    
James May 28, 1737 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire    
Robert July 25, 1739 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire March 26, 1813 or 1818** Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire
Margaret* about 1740 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire    
George Sept 15, 1741 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire April, 1758**  
Wallam June 2, 1743 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire    
David April 21, 1745 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire May 20, 1825**  
Ann May 25, 1747 Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire July 20, 1790*** Greenhill, Moffat, Dumfriesshire
Christian Feb 17, 1752 Carterhope, Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire March 12, 1836***  
Mary Feb 17, 1752 Carterhope, Tweedsmuir, Peebleshire March 14, 1797***  

* from marriage record
** from Peebleshire Monumental Inscription spre-1855, compiled by Sheila A. Scott
*** from Moffat Parish Memorial Inscriptions

Janet Welsh died in Carterhope, Peebleshire, (in Feb 1753) when James Welsh's brother "was too young to remember it". See Letter from James Welsh to his brother, May 6, 1780 The family probably moved to Corehead shortly after her death. George died on Feb 25, 1771 at Corehead. Both are buried in the Tweedsmuir parish churchyard (from The Welsh Family in The Tweedie Family - A Genealogy).

 
1742 ..........

William Johnstone of Corehead

Caledonian Mercury, Monday 08 January 1742

Caledonian Mercury, Monday 08 January 1742

 
1752 ..........

Mary & Christian Welsh

February 17, 1752 was Baptized Mary & Christian Welch lawful daughters to Gorg Welch in Carterhope
February 17, 1752 was Baptized Mary & Christian Welch lawful daughters to Gorg Welch in Carterhope
the witnesses James Welch in Fruid & John Welch in Over Minzion
See original document

 
1753 ..........

Janet Welsh

Janet Welsh (of Corehead), wife of George Welsh (of Fruid) died at Carterhope in February, 1753, and is buried in the Tweedsmuir parish churchyard. - from Letter from James Welsh to his brother, May 6, 1780

 


Monumental Inscriptions - Tweedsmuir Churchyard

George Welch died Feb 1771 aged 64,
wife Jannet Welch died Feb 1753 aged 43 when husband was in Carterhope,
son George died April 1758 aged 17
Margaret Welch wife of David Welch, Braefoot, died June 1807 (?) age 51,
also ? of their children Robert Welsh son of David tenant Braefoot died April 10, 1811 aged 27
above David Welsh May 20, 1825, aged 80
son George Aug 18, 1827 aged 44, James son of David Welsh Nov 18, 1856 aged 65
children of James Welsh , Margaret died 1833 age 9, Robert May 19, 1844 age 28
Margaret Welsh wife of James Welsh died April 1, 1874

- from Peebleshire Monumental Inscriptions pre-1855, compiled by Sheila A. Scott

Ed. Note: There were epidemics of Typhus and measles in England from 1810 to 1815.

 
1759 ..........

"Adam Atchison, servant to George Welsh tenant in Corehead"

Margaret Welsh & Adam Atchison

Adam Atchison, servant of George Welsh of Corehead, and Margaret Welsh, daughter of George Welsh, tenant of Corehead, were "clandestinely" married on Oct 23, 1759, in Moffat: "Moffat April 11th, 1760.... The moderator represented to the permanent members that Adam Atchison, servant to George Welsh tenant in Corehead had this day told him that  he is clandestinely married to Margaret Welsh daughter to the said George Welsh..."

They had at least three children: John (born May 23, 1760); George (born Oct 18, 1761); and Janet (born April 29, 1764), all in Moffat, Dumfriesshire. The age of Janet Atchison on her memorial inscription (died 1846, age 74, or born in 1772) may be incorrect. Following the Scottish naming pattern John would be Adam's father, George would be Margaret's father and Janet would be Margaret's mother (John Atchison, George Welsh and Janet Welsh works).

Janet Aitchison & James Hunter

 
1767 ..........

Ann Welsh & Adam Tait

This day Adam Tate late servant at Corehead and Ann Welsh his Masters daughter was proclamed the third and last time
This day Adam Tate late servant at Corehead and Ann Welsh his Masters daughter was proclamed the third and last time
See original document

DNA: We have an Ancestry DNA match with rabni who has an Isabela Tait (b.1819 in Traquhair, Peebleshire whose father was John Tait) although we have not been able to make the connection from her to "our" Adam Tait and Ann Welsh. We also have an Ancestry.com DNA match with Steven Campbell who has Adam Tait and Anne Welsh inn his tree. We also have an Ancestry.com DNA match with "D.B." who has Mary Tait & Thomas Borthwick in their tree. We also have an Ancestry.com DNA match with Michael Antoszek who has Ann Welsh & Adam Tait in his tree.

Ann Welsh and Adam Tait were married in Moffat on April 5, 1767. They had at least seven children: John (born June 14, 1767, in Moffat); David (born March 5, 1769, in Ettrick); Janet (born June 3, 1771, in Tweedsmuir); Mary (born March 24, 1774, in Tweedsmuir); Christian (born April 29, 1776, in Tweedsmuir); George (born March 30, 1779, in Tweedsmuir); and Adam (born April 20, 1781, in Tweedhopefoot, Tweedsmuir). - Scotland's People

John Tait & Jean Renwick | Janet Tait & Thomas Martin | Mary Tait & Thomas Borthwick | George Tait & Fanny Little
above marriages from Stevend ~ Nicholson Family Tree on Ancestry

The Carterhope farm laid on the south side of the valley and some walls and sheep pens can still be seen today in the higher unflooded slopes. It was on this farm that Ann Welsh was born in 1747. Her parents were George Welsh and Janet Welsh. Ann married Adam Tait in the spring of 1767. Adam was born over the hills as Roundtstonefoot in 1742. Thier oldest son John was born at Shortwoodend but we know that by the time their third child Mary was born the family were living back at Carterhope where Adam was now the Shepherd. Adam died in 1821 and his wife Ann died in 1790 aged only 43. It is their daughter Mary (1775-1853) who was my great x 5 grandmother. - from Andrew's Family Website

 


Monumental Inscriptions - Tweedsmuir Churchyard

Thomas Borthwick late herd Carterhope died Dec 22, 1847, aged 73
Wife Mary Tait died Carterhope Sept 16, 1853, aged 78.

- from Peebleshire Monumental Inscriptions pre-1855, compiled by Sheila A. Scott

 

 
1771 ..........

George Welsh

1771 Feb 25th Died at Corehead and was buried in the church yard here George Welsh Widower Tenant in Corehead aged 64 years
1771 Feb 25th Died at Corehead and was buried in the church yard here George Welsh Widower Tenant in Corehead aged 64 years
See original document

 
1772 ..........

Christian Welsh & James Tod

This day James Tod in Recox and Christian Welsh daughter to the deceased George Welsh of Corehead
This day James Tod in Rivox and Christian Welsh daughter to the deceased George Welsh of Corehead
was proclaimed the third and last time
See original document

Christian Welsh (daughter of George Welsh and Janet Welsh) and James Tod may have had at least two children: James and Janet (b. Nov 1, 1783 in Rivox, Moffat).

James Tod & Catherine Welsh

Dec 30, 1810 James Tod in this parish and Catherine Welsh in the parish of Wigtown...
Dec 30, 1810 James Tod in this parish and Catherine Welsh in the parish of Wigtown...
See original document

 


Memorial Inscriptions - Moffat Parish Church Churchyard

Here lies James Tod, tenant in Rivox who died 22nd October 1785 aged 42 years.
Also Catherine Welsh spouse to James Tod tenant in Raecleugh son of above James Tod
who died 10th July 1812 aged 24 years.
Also Christian Welsh spouse to above James Tod of Rivox who died 12th March 1836 aged 82 years

- from Moffat Parish Memorial Inscriptions

 

 
1773 ..........

James Welsh & Hannah Fletcher

James & Hannah Welsh, married Tuesday 31 of August 1773
James & Hannah Welsh, married Tuesday 31 of August 1773 (in Lancashire, England)
From Welsh Family Bible, Welsh Family Tree, DAKWelsh, Ancestry.com

 

David Welsh & Margaret Welsh

Sept 5th, 1773, David Welsh in this parish and Margaret Welsh in the parish of Drumelzier was proclaimed the third and last time
Sept 5th, 1773, David Welsh in this parish and Margaret Welsh in the parish of Drumelzier was proclaimed the third and last time
See original document

David Welsh and Margaret Welsh may have had at least six children: Mary (born Aug 19, 1774, in Braefoot); Alexander (born about 1776); George (born about 1783, died Aug 18, 1827); Robert (born about 1784, died April 10, 1811, on the Braefoot Farm, Ericstane); James (born March 3, 1791, Braefoot, died Nov 18, 1856, Ericstane); and David (born Dec 11, 1793, on the Braefoot Farm, died April 24, 1845, Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire). - from ross_home family tree on Ancestry.com

Alexander Welsh & Janet Ballantine | James Welsh & Margaret Martin | David Welsh & Mary Hamilton

David Welsh & Eliza Smith

My name is Stephen Welsh, I am a descendant ( great grandson) of a David Welsh who emigrated to Australia in the mid 1800s he was son of James Welsh 1791-1856 who was the brother of David Welsh DD who lead the disruption of 1843, there are now several thousand descendants of our David now living in Australia I have traveled to the Uk and visited the Moffat, Tweedsmuir area on two occasions, at which time I met other family descendants still living there. It seems that we are probably distant cousins and I was wondering if there is any family history that you could add to my research, several books have been written out here regarding this subject , however anything you might be able to contribute would be appreciated . - Stephen Welsh, March 15, 2018

David Welsh 1825-1901
David Welsh 1825-1901

 
1773 ..........

 

William Welsh & Marion Waugh


June 10th 1775 Mr. William Welsh, Minister and Miss Marion Waugh their names were up and after were married
Manor Parish, Peebleshire
See original document

Marion Waugh died on Feb 28, 1780.

From The Welsh Family in The Tweedie Family - A Genealogy

 
1775 ..........

Mary Welsh & William Tod

William Tod in the parish of Kirkpatrick Juxta and Mary Welsh in this parish
William Tod in the parish of Kirkpatrick Juxta and Mary Welsh in this parish
See original document

Map showing location of Salecoth
Map showing location of Salecoth
William Crawford, 1804
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

Mary Welsh (daughter of George Welsh and Janet Welsh) and William Tod (in Salecoth) may have had at least  eleven children born / christened in Moffat: George, Jannet and David (born April 1, 1789) all died in infancy); James (born about 1776, died in Liverpool in April, 1811); George (born about 1778, died in Liverpool in Dec, 1810); William (born about 1780, died in Liverpool Dec 25, 1815); Robert (born May 13, 1782); Mary (born Nov 12, 1784, died June 2, 1826); Patrick (born March 2, 1787); David (born Feb 7, 1791); and Hannah (born July 3, 1794).

 


Memorial Inscriptions - Moffat Parish Church Churchyard

In Memory of James Tod, fewar in Moffat, who died 16th March 1772 aged 62 years.
Also Mary Atchison his spouse who died 1st March 1785 aged 79 years.
Also Mary Welsh spouse to William Tod their son who died 14th March 1797 aged 44 years.
Also George, Jannet and David in infancy.
Also George who died in Liverpool December 1810 aged 32 years.
James who died April 1811 aged 35 years,
William who died at Liverpool 25th December 1815 aged 35 years,
Mary who died 2nd June 1826 aged 42 years,
all children of the above William Tod and Mary Welsh.
Also said William Tod, late tenant in Chapel who died 14th March 1830 aged 91 years.

- from Moffat Parish Memorial Inscriptions

 

 
1780 ..........

"the long but not forgotten death of our own Mother"

...the long but not forgotten death of our own Mother not unsimilar to your loss. I believe impressions made in early life are more durable than when advanced in years, at least that circumstance affected me more & has continued fresher in my memory than any event in my whole life. The last visit that I made her was by the desire of Dr. Hunter who told her end was near. When I got to Carterhope she expressed her satisfaction that I had walked there being a great fall of snow on the ground, & to pay me a Compt rose that evening to Tea & seemed in better spirits than for many days before...

Letter from James Welsh to his brother, May 6, 1780

 
1784 ..........

Robert & David Welsh in Corehead

From Caledonian Mercury, Saturday 17 January 1784
Caledonian Mercury, Saturday 17 January 1784

 

William Welsh & Sarah Ballantyne

The Rev. William Welsh & Sarah Ballantyne were married Feb 16, 1784.

Sarah Ballantyne died on April 8, 1795, and buried in Drumelzier, Peebles on April 14, 1795.

From The Welsh Family in The Tweedie Family - A Genealogy

 
1790 ..........

Ann Welsh

Also Ann Welsh his Wife who died at Greenhill July 20th 1790 aged 43 years
In Memory of Adam Tait who died Nov 5, 1821 aged 78 years
Also Ann Welsh his Wife who died at Greenhill July 20th 1790 aged 43 years
Moffat Old Churchyard
Photo courtesy Peter Cox, Findagrave

 


Monumental Inscriptions - Moffat Parish Church

In Memory of Adam Tait who died at Pacegillfoot November 5th 1821 aged 78 years.
Also Ann Welsh his wife who died at Greenhill July 20th 1790 aged 43 years.
Also John their son who died 7th August 1835 aged 68 years.
And Robert son of  John Tait who died 10th October  1835 aged 21 years.
Likewise Jean Renwick the above John Tait's spouse who died January 1865 aged 83 years.

From Moffat Parish Monumental Inscriptions

 

 
1794 ..........

"I was sorry to hear by a letter from our Brother David of the great loss of sheep"

I was sorry to hear by a letter from our Brother David of the great loss of sheep by the farmers in general in the late storm and that you had been one of the greatest sufferers. From the prosperity in that line for years past I thought it a safe business but I find its like every other precarious. However our losses are increased or diminished by comparison. When the war broke out I had a concern in three Ships then on voyages. Two got safe to market and did very well. The third was taken, by which I lost the profit of the voyage but luckily she was retaken, and if she had been carried into a french port I should have lost £500 – as I was insured and underwriters to that amount became Bankrupts – by this & the late failures so universal all over Britain I lost about £600 – but then when one saw many of their neighbours, not only people in business, but those who had their money lodged in Banks totally ruined , we think of ourselves well of in such general havock – and how much deplorable are they in France – thousands not only stripped of their whole property but themselves thrown into dungeons to abode the distant trials of partial judges and Juries – their King, Queen, Priests, Nobles and plebeians guillotined – towns that resist the present rulers burnt and the men women and the children massacred in cold blood...

Letter from James Welsh, Liverpool, to Robert Welsh, Corehead Feb 26, 1794

 
1798 ..........

William Welsh & Marion Tweedie

William Welsh married Marion Tweedie on Oct 15, 1789.

From The Welsh Family in The Tweedie Family - A Genealogy

 

David Welsh, Braefoot & Robert Welsh, Corehead
Braefoot is also known as Erikstane and is located just to the south of Corehead

1797-1798 Farm Horse Tax, Moffat, Dumfrisshire
1797-1798 Farm Horse Tax, Moffat, Dumfrisshire
There was also a Wallam Welsh at Chapelhill with three horses

Map showing Braefoot. The farm just to the north is Corehead and just to the south is Meikleholmeside.
Map showing Braefoot. The farm just to the north is Corehead and just to the south is Meikleholmeside.
William Crawford, 1804
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

David Welsh was born on the 11th December 1793 at Braefoot

David Welsh was born on the 11th December 1793 at Braefoot

The Reverend Dr. David Welsh | Significant Scots - David Welsh

A monument (in St. Cuthbert's Churchyard) commemorates the Rev. David Welsh, D.D. This eminent divine was son of a farmer at Moffat; he was born in that parish on the llth December, 1793. Educated at the University of Edinburgh, he was licensed to preach in 1816. In March, 1821, he was ordained to the pastoral charge of Crossmichael; he was subsequently translated to St. David's Church, Glasgow; and was, in 1831, appointed to. the Professorship of Church History in the University of Edinburgh. In 1842 he was chosen Moderator of the General Assembly. At the opening of the Assembly the following year, he announced the determination of a large number of his brethren to leave the Establishment and constitute the Free Church. Dr. Welsh died suddenly on the 24th April, 1845. He several years held the secretaryship of the Scottish Bible Board. For a time he edited the North British Eeview. - from Monuments and monumental inscriptions in Scotland

St. Cuthbert's Parish Churchyard, Edinburgh

Sacred To The Memory of David Welsh, D.D.
Photo by Stephen C. Dickson

David Welsh died April 24, 1845
From Scottish Record Society, Monumental Inscriptions in St. Cuthbert's Churchyard, Edinburgh, James Balfour, 1915

The Waugh Family Library

A Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Scotsmen, Vol 5., by Robert Chambers, 1856 (6.3 Mb pdf)

David Welsh was born on the 11th December 1793 at Braefoot
Where Dr. Welsh's father, leaving the neighbouring parish of Tweedsmuir...
From Sermons by the Late Reverend David Welsh (DD) with memoire by A. Dunlop Esq., 1846
David Welsh married Mary Hamilton around 1820

Where the only surviving son of the family, James Welsh, Esq... still resides...

1851 Scotland Census - Moffat, Dumfriesshire
James Welsh & Margaret Martin

Name: James Welsh
Age: 60
Estimated birth year: abt 1791
Relationship: Head
Spouse: Margaret Welsh
Gender: Male
Where born: Moffat, Peeblesshire
Parish Number: 842
Civil Parish: Moffat
County: Dumfriesshire
Address: Bankfoot
Occupation: Farmer Of 175 Acres Arable And 3650 Pasture Employing 14 Men & 2 Women Labourners, Alse Farmers Earla Laugh Of 1800 Acres Pasture (of Which Proprietorn And Carteship Of 1700 Acres Pasture Both In The Parish Of Tweedamder And County Of Peebles, Also Hulope Of 1400 Acres Pasture In The Parish Of ?? And County Of Roxburgh And Employing 6 Sheepherdo On The Farmes
ED: 3
Page: 11
Household schedule number: 44
LINE: 14
Roll: CSSCT1851_209
Household Members:
Name Age
James Welsh 60
Margaret Welsh 53
George Welsh 22
Marion Welsh 20
John Welsh 15
William Martin Welsh 12
Margaret Welsh 10
Cathrine Welsh 8
John Brown 46
William Brown 24
Adam Haster 18
Adam Fait 18
Sarah Waugh 21
Mary Markness 18
Grace Danielson 20

Source Citation Parish: Moffat; ED: 3; Page: 11; Line: 14; Roll: CSSCT1851_209; Year: 1851 Source Information Ancestry.com. 1851 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data: Scotland. 1851 Scotland Census. Reels 1-217. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Description The 1851 Census for Scotland was taken on the night of 30/31 March 1851. The following information was requested: place, name, relationship to head of family, marital status, age, gender, profession, birthplace, and whether blind, deaf, and dumb.

Thomas Welsh (son of James Welsh & Margaret Martin) married Jane Halliday on Oct 20, 1874 and they were living at Ericstane in the 1881 Scotland Census. Catherine was living with her mother at Braefoot in the 1861 census.

Ordnance Survey Map showing Corehead, Ericstane and Braefoot
Ordnance Survey Map showing Corehead, Ericstane and Braefoot
Courtesy National Library of Scotland

Earlshaugh... Occupied by James Tait, proprietor James Welsh, Ericstane

Occupied by James Tait, proprietor James Welsh, Ericstane
Earlshaugh... A house one story high in good repair, slated with a vegetable garden attached.
Occupied by James Tait, proprietor James Welsh, Ericstane
From Scotland's Places, Ordnance Survey Name Books Dumfriesshire OS Name Books, 1848-1858 Dumfriesshire volume 38 OS1/10/38/39
See original document

There were members of the Welsh and Tait family living at Corehead until at least 1901.

Where Dr. Welsh's father, leaving the neighbouring parish of Tweedsmuir...

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